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Blood Metabolite Signature of Metabolic Syndrome Implicates Alterations in Amino Acid Metabolism: Findings from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) and the Tsuruoka Metabolomics Cohort Study (TMCS)
Open AccessArticle

Blood Metabolite Signatures of Metabolic Syndrome in Two Cross-Cultural Older Adult Cohorts

1
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience Section, Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
2
Brain Aging and Behavior Section, Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
3
Translational Gerontology Branch, National Institute on Aging, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
4
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
5
Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Kings College London, London SE19NH, UK
6
Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, 2820 Gentofte, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(4), 1324; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21041324
Received: 27 January 2020 / Revised: 11 February 2020 / Accepted: 12 February 2020 / Published: 16 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics in Medicine)
Metabolic syndrome (MetS) affects an increasing number of older adults worldwide. Cross-cultural comparisons can provide insight into how factors, including genetic, environmental, and lifestyle, may influence MetS prevalence. Metabolomics, which measures the biochemical products of cell processes, can be used to enhance a mechanistic understanding of how biological factors influence metabolic outcomes. In this study we examined associations between serum metabolite concentrations, representing a range of biochemical pathways and metabolic syndrome in two older adult cohorts: The Tsuruoka Metabolomics Cohort Study (TMCS) from Japan (n = 104) and the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) from the United States (n = 146). We used logistic regression to model associations between MetS and metabolite concentrations. We found that metabolites from the phosphatidylcholines-acyl-alkyl, sphingomyelin, and hexose classes were significantly associated with MetS and risk factor outcomes in both cohorts. In BLSA, metabolites across all classes were uniquely associated with all outcomes. In TMCS, metabolites from the amino acid, biogenic amines, and free fatty acid classes were uniquely associated with MetS, and metabolites from the sphingomyelin class were uniquely associated with elevated triglycerides. The metabolites and metabolite classes we identified may be relevant for future studies exploring disease mechanisms and identifying novel precision therapy targets for individualized medicine. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolomics; metabolic syndrome; hypertension; diabetes; obesity; triglycerides; phosphatidylcholines; sphingomyelins; amino acids; ceramides; acylcarnitines metabolomics; metabolic syndrome; hypertension; diabetes; obesity; triglycerides; phosphatidylcholines; sphingomyelins; amino acids; ceramides; acylcarnitines
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Mahajan, U.V.; Varma, V.R.; Huang, C.-W.; An, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Ferrucci, L.; Takebayashi, T.; Harada, S.; Iida, M.; Legido-Quigley, C.; Thambisetty, M. Blood Metabolite Signatures of Metabolic Syndrome in Two Cross-Cultural Older Adult Cohorts. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 1324.

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