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Review

Polyamine Metabolism and Oxidative Protein Folding in the ER as ROS-Producing Systems Neglected in Virology

1
Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov str. 32, Moscow 119991, Russia
2
Cancer Research Center Lyon, INSERM U1052 and CNRS 5286, Lyon University, 69003 Lyon, France
3
DevWeCan Laboratories of Excellence Network (Labex), Lyon 69003, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(4), 1219; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19041219
Received: 21 March 2018 / Revised: 3 April 2018 / Accepted: 11 April 2018 / Published: 17 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Free Radicals and Oxidants in Pathogenesis)
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in various cell compartments by an array of enzymes and processes. An excess of ROS production can be hazardous for normal cell functioning, whereas at normal levels, ROS act as vital regulators of many signal transduction pathways and transcription factors. ROS production is affected by a wide range of viruses. However, to date, the impact of viral infections has been studied only in respect to selected ROS-generating enzymes. The role of several ROS-generating and -scavenging enzymes or cellular systems in viral infections has never been addressed. In this review, we focus on the roles of biogenic polyamines and oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and their interplay with viruses. Polyamines act as ROS scavengers, however, their catabolism is accompanied by H2O2 production. Hydrogen peroxide is also produced during oxidative protein folding, with ER oxidoreductin 1 (Ero1) being a major source of oxidative equivalents. In addition, Ero1 controls Ca2+ efflux from the ER in response to e.g., ER stress. Here, we briefly summarize the current knowledge on the physiological roles of biogenic polyamines and the role of Ero1 at the ER, and present available data on their interplay with viral infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: reactive oxygen species; peroxide; polyamines; spermine; spermidine; spermine oxidase; oxidoreductin; oxidative protein folding; calcium reactive oxygen species; peroxide; polyamines; spermine; spermidine; spermine oxidase; oxidoreductin; oxidative protein folding; calcium
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MDPI and ACS Style

Smirnova, O.A.; Bartosch, B.; Zakirova, N.F.; Kochetkov, S.N.; Ivanov, A.V. Polyamine Metabolism and Oxidative Protein Folding in the ER as ROS-Producing Systems Neglected in Virology. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 1219. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19041219

AMA Style

Smirnova OA, Bartosch B, Zakirova NF, Kochetkov SN, Ivanov AV. Polyamine Metabolism and Oxidative Protein Folding in the ER as ROS-Producing Systems Neglected in Virology. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2018; 19(4):1219. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19041219

Chicago/Turabian Style

Smirnova, Olga A., Birke Bartosch, Natalia F. Zakirova, Sergey N. Kochetkov, and Alexander V. Ivanov 2018. "Polyamine Metabolism and Oxidative Protein Folding in the ER as ROS-Producing Systems Neglected in Virology" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 19, no. 4: 1219. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19041219

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