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Recent Advances and the Potential for Clinical Use of Autofluorescence Detection of Extra-Ophthalmic Tissues

1
Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Campus Charité Mitte and Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany
2
Department of Surgery, Campus Charité Mitte and Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany
3
Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Evangelisches Krankenhaus Paul Gerhardt Stift, Paul-Gerhardt-Str. 42–45, 06886 Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Germany
4
Department of Surgery, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Brüder Graz, Marschallgasse 12, 8020 Graz, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Anna Cleta Croce
Molecules 2020, 25(9), 2095; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25092095
Received: 30 March 2020 / Revised: 26 April 2020 / Accepted: 28 April 2020 / Published: 30 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Autofluorescence Spectroscopy and Imaging)
The autofluorescence (AF) characteristics of endogenous fluorophores allow the label-free assessment and visualization of cells and tissues of the human body. While AF imaging (AFI) is well-established in ophthalmology, its clinical applications are steadily expanding to other disciplines. This review summarizes clinical advances of AF techniques published during the past decade. A systematic search of the MEDLINE database and Cochrane Library databases was performed to identify clinical AF studies in extra-ophthalmic tissues. In total, 1097 articles were identified, of which 113 from internal medicine, surgery, oral medicine, and dermatology were reviewed. While comparable technological standards exist in diabetology and cardiology, in all other disciplines, comparability between studies is limited due to the number of differing AF techniques and non-standardized imaging and data analysis. Clear evidence was found for skin AF as a surrogate for blood glucose homeostasis or cardiovascular risk grading. In thyroid surgery, foremost, less experienced surgeons may benefit from the AF-guided intraoperative separation of parathyroid from thyroid tissue. There is a growing interest in AF techniques in clinical disciplines, and promising advances have been made during the past decade. However, further research and development are mandatory to overcome the existing limitations and to maximize the clinical benefits. View Full-Text
Keywords: autofluorescence imaging; clinical studies; endogenous fluorophores; imaging; inflammation; systematic review autofluorescence imaging; clinical studies; endogenous fluorophores; imaging; inflammation; systematic review
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Wizenty, J.; Schumann, T.; Theil, D.; Stockmann, M.; Pratschke, J.; Tacke, F.; Aigner, F.; Wuensch, T. Recent Advances and the Potential for Clinical Use of Autofluorescence Detection of Extra-Ophthalmic Tissues. Molecules 2020, 25, 2095.

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