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Evaluation of Glycosyl-Hydrolases, Phosphatases, Esterases and Proteases as Potential Biomarker for NaCl-Stress Tolerance in Solanum lycopersicum L. Varieties

1
Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad Técnica Estatal de Quevedo, Quevedo, Los Ríos 120501, Ecuador
2
Departamento Académico de Agronomía, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California Sur, La Paz, Baja California Sur 23080, Mexico
3
Programa de Agricultura en Zonas Áridas, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste, S.C. La Paz, Baja California Sur 23096, Mexico
4
Dipartimento di Scienze agro-ambientali e territoriali, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari 70121, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Molecules 2019, 24(13), 2488; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24132488
Received: 27 May 2019 / Revised: 30 June 2019 / Accepted: 5 July 2019 / Published: 7 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Chemical Biology)
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Abstract

Salinity stress limited the production in over 30% of irrigated crops and 7% of dryland agriculture worldwide. The objective was to evaluate the effects of NaCl-stress on the enzymatic activity in tomato. Two experiments were carried out in germination and early vegetative growth stages. The activity of proline and peroxidase of eight varieties (Missouri, Yaqui, Vita, Feroz, Rio Grande, Tropic, Ace, and Floradade) submitted to NaCl concentrations (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 mM de NaCl) and the semi-quantitative activity of 19 enzymes APY ZYM® were measured under a completely randomized design with four replications. Data were analyzed using univariate-multivariate analysis of variance, Tukey’s HSD (p = 0.05), canonical discriminant and cluster analysis. The results showed significant differences between varieties and NaCl in proline content. Proline increased as the NaCl concentration increased. Peroxidase did no show significant differences. Eight enzymes were included within the model to properly classify the varieties and NaCl. In shoots, varieties and NaCl showed that enzymatic activity was higher in the order of alkaline-phosphatase > leucine arylamidase > acid phosphatase > naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase > n-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase > β-galactosidase, while in roots was higher in the order of alkaline-phosphatase > naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase > acid phosphatase > n-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase. Acid and alkali phosphatase, lipase, esterase, β-galactosidase, and trypsin can be a potential biomarker for NaCl-stress tolerance in tomato. View Full-Text
Keywords: salinity-stress tolerance; biochemical indicators; proline; peroxidase; semi-quantitative enzymes; tomato salinity-stress tolerance; biochemical indicators; proline; peroxidase; semi-quantitative enzymes; tomato
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Reyes-Pérez, J.J.; Ruiz-Espinoza, F.H.; Hernández-Montiel, L.G.; de Lucía, B.; Cristiano, G.; Murillo-Amador, B. Evaluation of Glycosyl-Hydrolases, Phosphatases, Esterases and Proteases as Potential Biomarker for NaCl-Stress Tolerance in Solanum lycopersicum L. Varieties. Molecules 2019, 24, 2488.

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