Topic Editors

Oral Medicine in the Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Murcia, 30008 Murcia, Spain
Prof. Dr. Ivan Alajbeg
Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA
Dr. Eduardo Pons-Fuster
Departamento de Anatomía Humana y Psicobiología, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, Biomedical Research Institute (IMIB-Arrixaca), University of Murcia Spain, 30100 Murcia, Spain

Bridging Oral Medicine and Systemic Disease

Abstract submission deadline
31 March 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
7 July 2024
Viewed by
9051

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral medicine is concerned with clinical diagnosis and non-surgical management of non-dental pathologies affecting the orofacial region (the mouth and the lower face). Many systemic diseases have signs or symptoms that manifest in the orofacial region. Pathologically, the mouth may be afflicted by many cutaneous and gastrointestinal conditions. There is also the unique situation of hard tissues penetrating the epithelial continuity (hair and nails are intra-epithelial tissues). The biofilm that covers teeth therefore causes unique pathologic entities known as plaque-induced diseases. Example conditions that oral medicine is concerned with are lichen planus, Behçet's disease and pemphigus vulgaris. Moreover, it involves the diagnosis and follow-up of pre-malignant lesions of the oral cavity, such as leukoplakias or erythroplakias and of chronic and acute pain conditions such as paroxysmal neuralgias, continuous neuralgias, myofascial pain, atypical facial pain, autonomic cephalalgias, headaches and migraines. Another aspect of the field is managing the dental and oral condition of medically compromised patients such as cancer patients suffering from related oral mucositis, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws or oral pathology related to radiation therapy. Additionally, it is involved in the diagnosis and management of dry mouth conditions (such as Sjögren's syndrome) and non-dental chronic orofacial pain, such as burning mouth syndrome, trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint disorder.

Prof. Dr. Pia Lopez-Jornet
Prof. Dr. Ivan Alajbeg
Prof. Dr. Rui Amaral Mendes
Dr. Eduardo Pons-Fuster
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • oral lichen planus
  • leukoplakia, oral mucositis
  • burning mouth syndrome

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Cancers
cancers
5.2 7.4 2009 17.9 Days CHF 2900 Submit
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ijerph
- 5.4 2004 29.6 Days CHF 2500 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit

Preprints.org is a multidiscipline platform providing preprint service that is dedicated to sharing your research from the start and empowering your research journey.

MDPI Topics is cooperating with Preprints.org and has built a direct connection between MDPI journals and Preprints.org. Authors are encouraged to enjoy the benefits by posting a preprint at Preprints.org prior to publication:

  1. Immediately share your ideas ahead of publication and establish your research priority;
  2. Protect your idea from being stolen with this time-stamped preprint article;
  3. Enhance the exposure and impact of your research;
  4. Receive feedback from your peers in advance;
  5. Have it indexed in Web of Science (Preprint Citation Index), Google Scholar, Crossref, SHARE, PrePubMed, Scilit and Europe PMC.

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Journals
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
13 pages, 1310 KiB  
Article
Machine Learning Analysis of the Anatomical Parameters of the Upper Airway Morphology: A Retrospective Study from Cone-Beam CT Examinations in a French Population
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(1), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12010084 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1136
Abstract
The objective of this study is to assess, using cone-beam CT (CBCT) examinations, the correlation between hard and soft anatomical parameters and their impact on the characteristics of the upper airway using symbolic regression as a machine learning strategy. Methods: On each CBCT, [...] Read more.
The objective of this study is to assess, using cone-beam CT (CBCT) examinations, the correlation between hard and soft anatomical parameters and their impact on the characteristics of the upper airway using symbolic regression as a machine learning strategy. Methods: On each CBCT, the upper airway was segmented, and 24 anatomical landmarks were positioned to obtain six angles and 19 distances. Some anatomical landmarks were related to soft tissues and others were related to hard tissues. To explore which variables were the most influential to explain the morphology of the upper airway, principal component and symbolic regression analyses were conducted. Results: In total, 60 CBCT were analyzed from subjects with a mean age of 39.5 ± 13.5 years. The intra-observer reproducibility for each variable was between good and excellent. The horizontal soft palate measure mostly contributed to the reduction of the airway volume and minimal section area with a variable importance of around 50%. The tongue and the position of the hyoid bone were also linked to the upper airway morphology. For hard anatomical structures, the anteroposterior position of the mandible and the maxilla had some influence. Conclusions: Although the volume of the airway is not accessible on all CBCT scans performed by dental practitioners, this study demonstrates that a small number of anatomical elements may be markers of the reduction of the upper airway with, potentially, an increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea. This could help the dentist refer the patient to a suitable physician. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Bridging Oral Medicine and Systemic Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 619 KiB  
Systematic Review
Correlation between Oral Lichen Planus and Viral Infections Other Than HCV: A Systematic Review
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(18), 5487; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11185487 - 19 Sep 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2038
Abstract
Objectives: This review aimed to evaluate the correlation between viral infections (HPV, EBV, HSV-1, CMV) other than HCV and oral lichen planus to assess if there is sufficient evidence to establish if these viruses can play a role in the etiopathogenesis of the [...] Read more.
Objectives: This review aimed to evaluate the correlation between viral infections (HPV, EBV, HSV-1, CMV) other than HCV and oral lichen planus to assess if there is sufficient evidence to establish if these viruses can play a role in the etiopathogenesis of the disease. Materials and methods: We reviewed the literature using different search engines (PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library), employing MeSH terms such as “oral lichen planus” and “OLP” in conjunction with other terms. We utilized the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcomes, and Study design (PICOS) method to define our study eligibility criteria. Results: A total of 43 articles of the 1219 results initially screened were included in the study. We allocated the 43 selected items into four groups, according to each related virus: HPV, EBV, HSV-1, and CMV. Conclusions: Heterogeneous results neither confirm nor exclude a direct correlation between the investigated viral infections and oral lichen planus etiopathogenesis and its feasible malignant transformation. Many viral agents can cause oral lesions and act as cancerizing agents. Future studies could be desirable to produce comparable statistical analyses and enhance the quantity and quality of the outcomes to promote the translation of research into clinical practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Bridging Oral Medicine and Systemic Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 586 KiB  
Article
Response to Treatment with Melatonin and Clonazepam versus Placebo in Patients with Burning Mouth Syndrome
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(9), 2516; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11092516 - 29 Apr 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2297
Abstract
Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of melatonin and clonazepam versus placebo in patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Methods: a prospective double-blind study was carried out in patients with BMS and randomized to three groups: melatonin (1 mg once a day), clonazepam (0.5 [...] Read more.
Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of melatonin and clonazepam versus placebo in patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Methods: a prospective double-blind study was carried out in patients with BMS and randomized to three groups: melatonin (1 mg once a day), clonazepam (0.5 mg/twice a day), or a placebo once a day, for 8 weeks. The clinical changes were evaluated, including xerostomia, the Oral Health Impact Profile 14 (OHIP-14) score, Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Oxygen saturation and heart rate were recorded, with an analysis of salivary biomarkers in the forms of oxytocin, ferritin, adenosine deaminase (ADA), total proteins, and alpha-amylase. Results: a total of 64 patients were analyzed. A significant decrease in burning sensation was recorded with melatonin (7.8 ± 1.54 pre-treatment, 5.78 ± 2.54 post-treatment; p < 0.001) and clonazepam (8.75 ± 1.2 pre-treatment, 5.5 ± 3.6 post-treatment (p < 0.01). With regard to quality of life (OHIP-14), significant improvements were observed before and after the administration of melatonin (p < 0.001) and clonazepam (p = 0.001). On the other hand, with regard to the changes in salivary biomarkers following treatment, negative correlations were found between oxytocin and drainage (r = −0.410; p = 0.009) and between the HADS-D score and ferritin (r = −0.312; p = 0.05). While salivary amylase showed positive correlation with heart rate (r = 0.346; p = 0.029) and oxygen saturation (r = 0.419; p = 0.007). Conclusions: melatonin and clonazepam were shown to be effective at reducing the burning sensation and improving quality of life. Both drugs were found to be safe, with no major adverse effects in patients with BMS. Melatonin may be regarded as an alternative treatment for patients with BMS, though further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Bridging Oral Medicine and Systemic Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

7 pages, 971 KiB  
Review
Patients with Thyroid Disorder, a Contraindication for Dental Implants? A Systematic Review
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(9), 2399; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11092399 - 25 Apr 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2277
Abstract
The thyroid gland is composed of the thyroid follicles, considered to be the functional units of the thyroid gland. The synthesis of the thyroid hormones occurs in these follicles. Triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) are the thyroid hormones and affect metabolic processes all [...] Read more.
The thyroid gland is composed of the thyroid follicles, considered to be the functional units of the thyroid gland. The synthesis of the thyroid hormones occurs in these follicles. Triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) are the thyroid hormones and affect metabolic processes all through the body. This systematic evaluation was performed to answer the following PICO question: “Can patients with thyroid disorders undergo dental implant rehabilitation with the same survival rate as patients without thyroid disorders?”. A systematic review of the literature was conducted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statements to gather available and current evidence of thyroid disorders and its relationship with dental implants. The electronic search, in the PubMed and Cochrane databases, yielded 22 articles. Out of the 22 articles, only 11 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Manual research of the reference list yielded no additional papers. According to the SORT criteria and answering our PICO question, level B can be established to conclude that patients with thyroid disorders can be rehabilitated with dental implants, with similar survival rates as patients without thyroid disorders. Papers with higher scientific evidence and bigger sample size should be carried out. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Bridging Oral Medicine and Systemic Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop