Topic Editors

European Institute of Membranes (IEM), University of Montpellier, 34090 Montpellier, France
1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Chandigarh University, Gharuan, Mohali 140413, India
2. University Centre for Research and Development, Chandigarh University, Gharuan, Mohali 140413, India

Nanomaterials and Their Composites for Environmental Remediation

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 April 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (30 June 2023)
Viewed by
4560

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

As modern civilization progresses, several types of pollutants are released into the environment as a result of human activities and industrial processes. There are, for example, many air pollutants, such as particulate matter (PM2.5, particles with a diameter of 2.5 μm or less; PM10, particles with a diameter of 10 μm or less), gases (carbon dioxide, CO2; carbon monoxide, CO; formaldehyde, HCHO), biological molecules (bacteria, viruses), and so forth. Severe water pollution containing organic dyes and pesticides, inorganic metal ions, and biological pollutants (bacteria, viruses, algae) is also widespread. Environmental pollution and the energy crises are continuing to thwart society's long-term growth and have a negative impact on people’s quality of life all over the world. Remediation of the environment has grown exceedingly challenging. Therefore, there is an urgent need to establish effective ways of reducing or eliminating pollution in the environment. Due of its relatively interdisciplinary nature, nanotechnology has a wide range of potential applications in this context. The use of nanomaterials to remediate the environment can play a crucial role because the properties of nanoparticles (NPs) (such as electronic, optical, magnetic, and catalytic properties) can be engineered by the engineering of size and shape of NPs. Nanotechnology renders an opportunity to manipulate shape, size, and physical and chemical properties such as surface to volume ratio, structure, dispersibility, reactivity, etc. Nanomaterials have the potential to increase reactivity and leverage surface chemistry compared to traditional approaches. Modification of nanomaterials is possible by functionalizing or grafting with different functional groups, which can be very useful to target specific pollutants. Thus, the remediation process can be very efficient. Tunable parameters/properties in the case of nanomaterials, such as size, morphology, and porosity, make them advantageous over conventional methods. Hence, techniques based on nanomaterials are beneficial for the treatment of natural/industrial/domestic wastewater, soils, sediments, mine tailings, and polluted atmosphere. Specifically, this topic will provide the most recent advances and perspectives on novel nanomaterials (metal-based, metal-oxide-based, and carbon-based), architectures, and strategies, considering but not limited to the fields of:

  • Nanomaterials synthesis via different novel approaches and their environmental remotion applications;
  • Sustainable synthesis of nanomaterials using plant materials, microorganisms, bacteria, algae, and various biowastes, including vegetable waste, fruit peel waste, eggshell, and agricultural waste, in the context of a clean environment; materials that are environmentally friendly, cost-effective, and avoid the use of toxic chemicals;
  • Modification of metal nanoparticles for the fabrication of analytical sensors for the monitoring of water pollutants;
  • Functionalization of metal/metal oxide NPs with carbon-based materials for photocatalysis, antimicrobial, and heavy metal ion sensing;
  • Environmental applications of green nanomaterials, including wastewater treatment and water remediation, air treatment, and water and air pollutant monitoring;
  • Core–shell-based nanomaterials for water purification and biological applications.

Dr. Mikhael Bechelany
Dr. Jagpreet Singh
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanocomposites
  • nanobiochar
  • metal/metal oxide
  • carbon-based nanomaterials
  • core–shell nanoparticles
  • green synthesis
  • atomic layer deposition
  • sustainable chemistry
  • pollutant detection
  • wastewater, adsorption
  • air, soil treatment
  • sensors
  • photocatalysis
  • antimicrobial, antibacterial

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Catalysts
catalysts
3.9 6.3 2011 14.3 Days CHF 2700
Materials
materials
3.4 5.2 2008 13.9 Days CHF 2600
Nanomaterials
nanomaterials
5.3 7.4 2011 13.6 Days CHF 2900
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400

Preprints.org is a multidiscipline platform providing preprint service that is dedicated to sharing your research from the start and empowering your research journey.

MDPI Topics is cooperating with Preprints.org and has built a direct connection between MDPI journals and Preprints.org. Authors are encouraged to enjoy the benefits by posting a preprint at Preprints.org prior to publication:

  1. Immediately share your ideas ahead of publication and establish your research priority;
  2. Protect your idea from being stolen with this time-stamped preprint article;
  3. Enhance the exposure and impact of your research;
  4. Receive feedback from your peers in advance;
  5. Have it indexed in Web of Science (Preprint Citation Index), Google Scholar, Crossref, SHARE, PrePubMed, Scilit and Europe PMC.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Journals
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
14 pages, 3619 KiB  
Article
Synthesis of MnSe-Based GO Composites as Effective Photocatalyst for Environmental Remediations
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(4), 667; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13040667 - 08 Feb 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1969
Abstract
In this work, a manganese selenide/graphene oxide (MnSe/GO)-based composite was prepared for wet-chemical assisted method against organic dye; herein, methylene blue (MB) dye removal from the water was employed as a metal selenide-based photocatalyst. The synthesized MnSe/GO composite was systematically characterized by X-ray [...] Read more.
In this work, a manganese selenide/graphene oxide (MnSe/GO)-based composite was prepared for wet-chemical assisted method against organic dye; herein, methylene blue (MB) dye removal from the water was employed as a metal selenide-based photocatalyst. The synthesized MnSe/GO composite was systematically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform electron microscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis. DRS). The structural characteristic revealed the adequate synthesis of the sample with good crystallinity and purity of the obtained products. The morphological analysis indicates the formation of MnSe nanoflakes composed of tiny particles on their surface. At the same time, the GO nanosheets with high aggregation were formed, which may be due to the van der Waals forces. The bond interaction and compositional analysis studies confirmed and supported the structural findings with high purity. The optical analysis showed the bandgap energies of MnSe and their composites MnSe (1.7 eV), 7% GO-MnSe (2.42 eV), 14% GO-MnSe (2.6 eV), 21% GO-MnSe (3.02 eV), and 28% GO-MnSe (3.24 eV) respectively, which increase the bandgap energy after GO and MnSe recombination. Among different contents, the optimized 21% GO-MnSe composite displayed enhanced photocatalytic properties. For instance, a short time of 90 min was taken compared with other concentrations due to the narrow bandgap of MnSe and the highly conductive charge carrier’s support, making the process to remove MB from water faster. These results show that the selenide-based photocatalyst can be an attractive candidate for future advanced photocatalysis applications. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 3163 KiB  
Article
Optimization of Paracetamol and Chloramphenicol Removal by Novel Activated Carbon Derived from Sawdust Using Response Surface Methodology
Sustainability 2023, 15(3), 2516; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15032516 - 31 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1606
Abstract
Paracetamol (PCT) and chloramphenicol (CPL) can have unfavorable impacts on human health, as well as on natural ecosystems. These substances contribute to the aquatic environment’s contamination and disturb the performance of municipal wastewater treatment systems, causing ecosystem disruption and microbial resistance. In this [...] Read more.
Paracetamol (PCT) and chloramphenicol (CPL) can have unfavorable impacts on human health, as well as on natural ecosystems. These substances contribute to the aquatic environment’s contamination and disturb the performance of municipal wastewater treatment systems, causing ecosystem disruption and microbial resistance. In this study, activated carbon produced from sawdust (ACs) was synthesized utilizing the chemical activation process for the removal of both PCT and CPL compounds from an aqueous solution. ACs has a primarily microporous structure with a significant specific surface area of 303–1298 m2/g, total pore volume of 0.462 cm3/g and bimodal distribution of pores of 0.73–1.7 nm. The removal efficiencies for PCT and CPL with the low-cost activated carbon, determined at the optimum dose (750 mg/L for PCT and 450 mg/L for CPL), were significantly high at 85% and 98%, respectively. The adsorption kinetics for both pharmaceuticals exhibited a quick initial decline. For PCT and CPL adsorption, the equilibrium was attained after just 20 and 90 min, respectively. The Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetics model offered the best fits for the adsorption of both compounds. Additionally, the central composite design (CCD) and Box–Behnken design (BBD) were used to optimize the experimental adsorption conditions using a response surface methodology (RSM). On the basis of the findings, it is evident that activated carbon made from sawdust may be used as a new, effective alternative adsorbent for removing PCT and CPL in aqueous environments. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop