Topic Editors

Dr. Denise Battaglini
Anesthesia and Critical Care, San Martino Policlinico Hospital, IRCCS for Oncology and Neurosci-ences, 16132 Genoa, Italy
Prof. Dr. Paolo Pelosi
1. Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
2. Anesthesia and Critical Care, San Martino Policlinico Hospital, IRCCS for Oncology and Neurosciences, 16132 Genoa, Italy

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Personalized Therapies and Beyond

Abstract submission deadline
31 October 2023
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2023
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Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

ARDS was first recognized in 1967, and since then, significant strides have been made in the effort to find effective therapies. Nevertheless, despite more than 50 years of research, identifying new effective treatments for the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is challenging. Personalized therapy to biological and clinical sub-phenotypes seems promising. Personalized interventions offer the chance to reduce heterogeneity, thus reproposing or newly testing treatments in another perspective. Moreover, ARDS is very heterogeneous syndrome, and understanding the interaction between lungs and other organs could improve our knowledge. The aim of this Special Issue is to publish papers on emerging opportunities for personalizing therapy for ARDS, from the identification of treatable traits to the recognition of target mechanisms, lungs–organs interaction, supportive therapies, new etiologies, and innovative clinical trial designs. Topics of interest include biological phenotypes, omics, physiological phenotypes, clinical phenotypes, ARDS definition, ARDS complications, lung–organs interactions in ARDS, etiology, and microbiota. We look forward to review articles, physiological papers, original research, preclinical experimental studies, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews.

Dr. Denise Battaglini
Prof. Dr. Paolo Pelosi
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • mechanical ventilation
  • supportive therapies
  • clinical trials
  • personalized medicine
  • ARDS
  • acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • microbiota
  • lung–organs crosstalk

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Advances in Respiratory Medicine
arm
- 1.4 2016 9 Days 1300 CHF Submit
Clinics and Practice
clinpract
- - 2011 21.5 Days 1600 CHF Submit
Diagnostics
diagnostics
3.992 2.4 2011 17.7 Days 2000 CHF Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
4.964 4.4 2012 18 Days 2600 CHF Submit
Journal of Personalized Medicine
jpm
3.508 1.8 2011 20.8 Days 2000 CHF Submit

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Article
Biological Markers to Predict Outcome in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Severe COVID-19 Living at High Altitude
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(2), 644; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12020644 - 13 Jan 2023
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Abstract
Background: There is not much evidence on the prognostic utility of different biological markers in patients with severe COVID-19 living at high altitude. The objective of this study was to determine the predictive value of inflammatory and hematological markers for the risk of [...] Read more.
Background: There is not much evidence on the prognostic utility of different biological markers in patients with severe COVID-19 living at high altitude. The objective of this study was to determine the predictive value of inflammatory and hematological markers for the risk of mortality at 28 days in patients with severe COVID-19 under invasive mechanical ventilation, living at high altitude and in a low-resource setting. Methods: We performed a retrospective observational study including patients with severe COVID-19, under mechanical ventilation and admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) located at 2850 m above sea level, between 1 April 2020 and 1 August 2021. Inflammatory (interleukin-6 (IL-6), ferritin, D-dimer, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)) and hematologic (mean platelet volume (MPV), neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), MPV/platelet ratio) markers were evaluated at 24 h and in subsequent controls, and when available at 48 h and 72 h after admission to the ICU. The primary outcome was the association of inflammatory and hematological markers with the risk of mortality at 28 days. Results: We analyzed 223 patients (median age (1st quartile [Q1]–3rd quartile [Q3]) 51 (26–75) years and 70.4% male). Patients with severe COVID-19 and with IL-6 values at 24 h ≥ 11, NLR values at 24 h ≥ 22, and NLR values at 72 h ≥ 14 were 8.3, 3.8, and 3.8 times more likely to die at 28 days, respectively. The SOFA and APACHE-II scores were not able to independently predict mortality. Conclusions: In mechanically ventilated patients with severe COVID-19 and living at high altitude, low-cost and immediately available blood markers such as IL-6 and NLR may predict the severity of the disease in low-resource settings. Full article
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