Advances in Floodplain Morphodynamics of Lowland Rivers

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Erosion and Sediment Transport".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (4 September 2023) | Viewed by 2027

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Tomasz Falkowski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Department of Water Engineering and Applied Geology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: applied geology; fluvial geomorphology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to their great economic and natural importance, river valleys, including their floodplain areas in particular, have been attracting the interest of researchers for a long time. It has been demonstrated that the state of the natural environment of the valley itself and the river basin is correlated with the nature of river erosion and deposition processes. The landforms preserved in the surface of the valley bottom as well as the features of the sediments that build them allow not only identifying the current state of their environment but also predicting the directions of development and evolution of these forms with high accuracy.

The currently observed development of research methods in Earth sciences has enabled researchers to record facts often with exceptional accuracy which, in turn, has allowed the determination of new, previously unnoticed dependencies and correlations.

I strongly encourage you to participate in the Special Issue of Water focused on lowland river floodplain morphodynamics. We would like to welcome submissions describing research related to:

  • characteristics and conditions of contemporary channel and overbank flow processes and their effect on the distribution of river erosion and deposition forms, as well as of alluvial sediments properties (such as sedimentological structures, mineral composition, geochemical characteristics, and others);
  • evolution of the fluvial environment and its recording in the floodplain elements;
  • channel hydraulics and their relationship with the geological structure of the valley and hydrotechnical structures;
  • extreme floods and their causes, course, and record on the surface of the floodplain;
  • relationship of the specific floodplain morphodynamics with the shaping of groundwater flow conditions in the alluvial layer;
  • relationship between the floodplain morphodynamics and the conditions of the functioning of natural habitats;
  • application of remote sensing methods in identifying the features of valley bottom morphodynamics.

Prof. Dr. Tomasz Falkowski
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • channel processes
  • floodplain features
  • river-system evolution
  • climate changes
  • alluvial deposits
  • mineralogy/geochemistry of alluvia
  • valley geological structure
  • remote sensing
  • valley hydrogeology
  • flood protection
  • river valleys biotopes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3992 KiB  
Article
The Natural Consequences of Land Use Change on Transformation and Vegetation Development in the Upper Odra Floodplain
Water 2023, 15(19), 3493; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15193493 - 06 Oct 2023
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Abstract
River channels are regulated in various ways and the fertile soils of valleys are occupied for agricultural purposes, accompanied by human settlements. In many places on the floodplains, gravel or sand is mined and former pits fill with water. The consequences are changes [...] Read more.
River channels are regulated in various ways and the fertile soils of valleys are occupied for agricultural purposes, accompanied by human settlements. In many places on the floodplains, gravel or sand is mined and former pits fill with water. The consequences are changes in water relations, changes in land use and land cover. Natural riparian ecosystems gradually disappear. In addition, river valleys are susceptible places for the spread of invasive plant species. In the section of the Upper Odra Valley discussed in this article, all of the aforementioned factors have played roles in shaping modern habitats. The present study shows the impact of human-induced changes on the transformation of the plant cover of the Upper Odra Floodplain. In designated transects, we studied land use changes from 1910 to the present day and examined plant species diversity. The results show that the more heavily transformed floodplain adjacent to the channelized channel has a higher level of species diversity than agricultural areas located along a section of the river with a natural channel course. Most of the river valleys are colonized by geographically invasive alien species, such as Reynoutria japonica, Reynoutria sachalenesis and Impatiens glandulifera, which have contributed to the fact that all of the species typical of the ash, poplar and willow riparian forests characteristic of this habitat type have retreated, which is the main reason for the very low biodiversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Floodplain Morphodynamics of Lowland Rivers)
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24 pages, 15560 KiB  
Article
Automatic River Planform Recognition Tested on Chilean Rivers
Water 2023, 15(14), 2539; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15142539 - 11 Jul 2023
Viewed by 877
Abstract
This paper addresses the issue of the automatic identification of river reaches and their planform type given the (observed) set of geomorphic elements and units. It introduces further advances with respect to the original proposal by Nardini and Brierley, and it explores explicitly [...] Read more.
This paper addresses the issue of the automatic identification of river reaches and their planform type given the (observed) set of geomorphic elements and units. It introduces further advances with respect to the original proposal by Nardini and Brierley, and it explores explicitly the ability of the algorithm and associated tools to work properly on significantly different rivers while adopting a given same parametrization. This was indeed an envisaged ability speculated as a challenging conclusion of the previous work. The Duqueco, Laja, and Biobío rivers (Chile) were analyzed for this purpose. The conclusion is definitely positive, which opens future promising application horizons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Floodplain Morphodynamics of Lowland Rivers)
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