Special Issue "Atmospheric Rivers and Extreme Rainfall Events: Recent Advances and Future Directions"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 October 2022) | Viewed by 1256

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jorge Eiras-Barca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Defense University Center at the Spanish Naval Academy, Marín, Spain
2. Environmental Physics Laboratory (EPhysLab), CIM-UVigo, Ourense, Spain
Interests: tropospheric physics; moisture transport analysis; extreme events; computational modeling
Prof. Dr. René Garreaud
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Climate and Resilience Research (CR2), Departamento de Geofísica, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile
Interests: synoptic, coastal and mountain meteorology; South America

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Atmospheric rivers (ARs) have experienced great notoriety in the last decade, attracting a great deal of attention from the scientific and operational communities. ARs play a prominent role in the hydrological cycle, as well as in the redistribution of energy on a planetary scale. Recently, it has been shown that most ARs have a positive impact, and they account for a substantial part of the moderate precipitation in different regions of the planet, especially along the west coast of the continents and adjacent mountain ranges. A few ARs, however, may result in extreme precipitation events when the enormous amount of moisture that they transport from their sources is subject to intense orographic or forced uplift. These kinds of phenomena are characterized by their high social and economic impact.

This Special Issue welcomes all papers related to precipitation formation in AR events and their attending impacts. Case studies, climatologies, observations, and modeling studies are invited to participate. 

Prof. Dr. Jorge Eiras-Barca
Prof. Dr. René Garreaud
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • AR physics and dynamics
  • AR case studies, climatologies and future projections
  • Extreme precipitation associated with ARs
  • AR detection, classification scales and forecasting
  • Environmental, social and economic impact of ARs

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
On the Relationship of Arctic Oscillation with Atmospheric Rivers and Snowpack in the Western United States Using Long-Term Multi-Platform Dataset
Water 2022, 14(15), 2392; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152392 - 02 Aug 2022
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Abstract
Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced integrated water vapor transport, modulated by large-scale and synoptic-scale variability. Here, we investigate how ARs and snowpack are shaped by large-scale variability such as arctic oscillation (AO) by examining the synoptic conditions and characteristics of [...] Read more.
Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced integrated water vapor transport, modulated by large-scale and synoptic-scale variability. Here, we investigate how ARs and snowpack are shaped by large-scale variability such as arctic oscillation (AO) by examining the synoptic conditions and characteristics of ARs and snowpack in the different phases of AO. Using Integrated Multi-Satellite Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (IMERG) data, Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA2) reanalysis data, and in-situ observation data over the eastern Pacific and western United States. we found that more precipitation is observed in lower latitudes (35° N–45° N) during negative AO months and farther north (north of 45° N) in latitude during positive AO months. These are associated with wavelike synoptic patterns in negative AO months and more straight-line type synoptic patterns in positive AO months. The different phases of AO also modulate the AR characteristics: 2.6% less intense (5.3% more intense) integrated water vapor transport and total precipitation, and 16.0% shorter (21.1% longer) duration of ARs than the climatological mean (1980–2019) for positive AO (negative AO) phase. AR frequency is also higher (~50.4%) than the climatological mean for negative AO phase, but there is no statistically significant difference between either negative AO or positive AO phase, especially in southern California. In addition, the snow water equivalent (SWE) tends to be reduced in the positive AO phase and under high-temperature conditions, especially in recent years (2010s). The similar relationships are found in the early 1990s and 2000s, but their statistical significances are low. Considering that lower atmospheric temperature keeps increasing over the eastern Pacific and the western U.S., and SWE tends to be reduced in the positive AO phase in recent years, SWE may decrease over northern California if the warming condition persists. These findings highlight how the characteristics of local extreme weather can be shaped by large-scale climate variability. Full article
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