Andrology and Reproductive Health

A special issue of Uro (ISSN 2673-4397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 11352

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Urology, Santa Chiara Regional and Teaching Hospital, 38123 Trento, Italy
Interests: andrology; biofilm; bladder cancer; bph; functional urology; nutraceuticals and phytotherapy; prostate cancer; penile cancer; urinary tract infections; mini-invasive surgery
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several decades ago, it was almost impossible to even imagine the progress that we have seen today in andrology and reproductive health. As you well know, the modern history of andrology is strictly associated to the discovery of sildenafil. Since March 1998, when sildenafil became available in the United States, we have had new PDE5-is drugs, and the amount of research has increased in the andrological field. Technical innovations, new drugs, and new insights in the pathophysiology of andrological disease have also improved our knowledge in the field of reproductive health. With  respect to andrology and reproductive health, we have recently taken a giant step forward, but there are some grey zones: developing new diagnostic tools, new management strategies in infertile men, and the influence of factors on semen quality such as air pollution, the use of pesticides, and harmful chemicals. Evidently, andrology and reproductive health are rapidly evolving sciences. In this Special Issue, we wish to discuss the newest findings concerning the grey zones in andrology and reproductive health, giving readers useful tools for everyday clinical practice. Key areas of this Special Issue include but are not limited to andrology, erectile dysfunction, precox ejaculation, hormone stimulation, hypogonadism, male infertility, testicular sperm extraction, and varicocele. Moreover, special attention will be given to the psychological impact of andrological diseases and the role of partners. We hope to give readers an interesting and multidisciplinary tool for use in everyday clinical practice and to invite many colleagues to focus part of their clinical research in the field of andrology and reproductive health.

Prof. Dr. Tommaso Cai
Guest Editor

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 535 KiB  
Article
Efficacy and Safety of a Natural Supplement Containing Serenoa Repens, Solanum Lycopersicum, Lycopene, and Bromelain in Reducing Symptoms of Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: A Prospective Cohort Study in 250 Patients
by Luca Lambertini, Alessandro Sandulli, Vincenzo Salamone, Mara Bacchiani, Sofia Giudici, Eleana Massaro, Anna Cadenar, Riccardo Mariottini, Simone Coco, Laia Bardina, Elena Ciaralli, Marco Saladino, Andrea Romano, Francesca Valastro, Antonio Andrea Grosso, Fabrizio Di Maida, Giampaolo Siena, Sabino Scelzi and Andrea Mari
Uro 2023, 3(3), 199-207; https://doi.org/10.3390/uro3030021 - 20 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1638
Abstract
Background: Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain syndrome NIH-class III is a widespread condition affecting men universally, with existing treatments showing limited success. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a natural supplement, composed of Serenoa repens, Solanum lycopersicum, lycopene, and bromelain, in managing [...] Read more.
Background: Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain syndrome NIH-class III is a widespread condition affecting men universally, with existing treatments showing limited success. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a natural supplement, composed of Serenoa repens, Solanum lycopersicum, lycopene, and bromelain, in managing symptoms of this condition among a substantial patient group. Methods: In this prospective study, 245 patients diagnosed with Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain syndrome NIH-class III were treated with the aforementioned supplement, alongside lifestyle alterations, such as refraining from spicy foods, alcohol, caffeine, and cycling, for a duration of three months. Patients’ progress was assessed at one and three months using the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI), the International Prostate Symptom Index (IPSS), quality of life (QoL) scores, and changes in total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Results: The supplement was well received with no serious adverse events reported. Significant improvements were observed in NIH-CPSI scores, IPSS, QoL scores, and a substantial decrease in total PSA levels at three months compared to baseline, with a positive trend noted from one-month to three-month evaluations. This was consistent in either patients with predominantly voiding or storage urinary symptoms. Conclusions: Our results suggest that this natural supplement in conjunction with lifestyle changes could offer a safe and effective alternative treatment for patients suffering from Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain syndrome NIH-class III. However, these findings require validation through further large-scale randomized controlled trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Andrology and Reproductive Health)
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Review

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11 pages, 2391 KiB  
Review
Prophylactic Lymphadenectomy in Patients with Penile Cancer: Is Sooner Better?
by Tommaso Cai, Marco Capece, Maria Grazia Zorzi, Alessandro Palmieri, Gabriella Nesi, Mattia Barbareschi and Truls E. Bjerklund Johansen
Uro 2023, 3(4), 251-261; https://doi.org/10.3390/uro3040025 - 9 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1037
Abstract
Background: Management of penile cancer patients has its grey zones. In particular, no strong evidence or recommendations exist regarding the timing of prophylactic lymphadenectomy. Here, we aim to review the impact that the timing of inguinal and pelvic prophylactic lymph node dissection [...] Read more.
Background: Management of penile cancer patients has its grey zones. In particular, no strong evidence or recommendations exist regarding the timing of prophylactic lymphadenectomy. Here, we aim to review the impact that the timing of inguinal and pelvic prophylactic lymph node dissection has on patient outcome. Methods: All relevant databases were searched following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis guidelines. A narrative review of indications for lymph node dissection and pathological considerations precede a systematic review of the impact of prophylactic lymph node dissection timing on prognosis. The primary endpoint is disease-free and overall survival in patients undergoing early or late lymph node dissection after penile cancer diagnosis. Results: Four clinical trials, all focusing on the role of inguinal lymph node dissection, are included. Despite the lack of randomized and controlled trials, this review suggests that lymph node dissection should be performed as soon as possible after diagnosis, with 3 months as a realistic cut-off. Conclusions: Survival of penile cancer patients is strictly related to the timing of prophylactic pelvic lymph node dissection. All patients at high risk of nodal metastasis should be offered lymph node dissection within three months of diagnosis, until new predicting tools are validated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Andrology and Reproductive Health)
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12 pages, 285 KiB  
Review
Fertility Preservation Options for Transgender Patients: An Overview
by Natalie Mainland, Dana A. Ohl, Ahmed R. Assaly, Nabila Azeem, Amber Cooper, Angie Beltsos, Puneet Sindhwani and Tariq A. Shah
Uro 2023, 3(4), 239-250; https://doi.org/10.3390/uro3040024 - 8 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1137
Abstract
Fertility preservation technologies have existed for decades, and the field is rapidly advancing; limited data exist regarding the use of these technologies by transgender patients. Many options are available for transgender patients who wish to preserve fertility before transitioning. These options include the [...] Read more.
Fertility preservation technologies have existed for decades, and the field is rapidly advancing; limited data exist regarding the use of these technologies by transgender patients. Many options are available for transgender patients who wish to preserve fertility before transitioning. These options include the cryopreservation of gametes, embryos, or ovarian tissue. Currently, ejaculated, or testicular sperm, immature oocytes, and ovarian tissue can be preserved for later use, but no such use option exists for immature testicular tissue. Many financial, sociological, and legal barriers and a lack of awareness among physicians and patients also hinders the utilization of these fertility preservation services. While options are abundant, usage rates are relatively low. The initial data regarding the successful use of preserved tissues appears promising, with birth rates not dissimilar to non-transgender patients. Further investigations into this area are needed. In addition, counseling regarding fertility preservation options should become a significant part of the provider-patient conversation before transitioning therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Andrology and Reproductive Health)
21 pages, 650 KiB  
Review
Effectiveness of Silymarin, Sulforaphane, Lycopene, Green Tea, Tryptophan, Glutathione, and Escin on Human Health: A Narrative Review
by Francesco Sebastiani, Carlo D’Alterio, Cristina Vocca, Luca Gallelli, Fabrizio Palumbo, Tommaso Cai and Alessandro Palmieri
Uro 2023, 3(3), 208-228; https://doi.org/10.3390/uro3030022 - 9 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2426
Abstract
Background: Recently, the role of nutraceutical compounds in the prevention of human diseases has been rapidly increasing. Here, we aim to evaluate the beneficial effect of dietary supplementation with seven active principles, i.e., lycopene, sulforaphane, silymarin, glutathione, escin, tryptophan, and green tea catechins, [...] Read more.
Background: Recently, the role of nutraceutical compounds in the prevention of human diseases has been rapidly increasing. Here, we aim to evaluate the beneficial effect of dietary supplementation with seven active principles, i.e., lycopene, sulforaphane, silymarin, glutathione, escin, tryptophan, and green tea catechins, on human health. Methods: An extensive search of PubMed and Medline database was performed with the following keywords: “silymarin”, “sulforaphane”, “lycopene”, “green tea catechins”, “tryptophan”, “glutathione” and “escin” accompanied by the keywords “supplement”, “supplementation”, and “nutraceutics”. All preclinical and clinical trials were considered for this review. Results: One hundred and eighteen full-text articles were eligible for inclusion in this review. The papers examined presented considerable variability due to the wide heterogeneity of dosages administered, population involved, and outcomes pursued. Conclusion: Nutritional supplementation with lycopene, sulforaphane, silymarin, glutathione, escin, tryptophan, and green tea catechins appears to exert a wide range of benefits on human health, ranging from mood and cognition to cardiovascular health, fertility, metabolism, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory capabilities, as well as potential anticancer effects. Further studies are required to better define the potential synergic effect, optimal dosage, mechanism of action, and tolerability profiles of these substances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Andrology and Reproductive Health)
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8 pages, 244 KiB  
Review
Current Evidence on the Use of Hyaluronic Acid as Nonsurgical Option for the Treatment of Peyronie’s Disease: A Contemporary Review
by Marco Capece, Giuseppe Celentano and Roberto La Rocca
Uro 2023, 3(2), 160-167; https://doi.org/10.3390/uro3020017 - 1 Jun 2023
Viewed by 4558
Abstract
Peyronie’s disease is a condition characterized by the formation of fibrous plaques in the tunica albuginea, which can cause pain, curvature, and erectile dysfunction. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the potential benefits of hyaluronic acid in treating Peyronie’s disease, including antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and proangiogenic [...] Read more.
Peyronie’s disease is a condition characterized by the formation of fibrous plaques in the tunica albuginea, which can cause pain, curvature, and erectile dysfunction. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the potential benefits of hyaluronic acid in treating Peyronie’s disease, including antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and proangiogenic effects, although more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms of action. Clinical studies have shown promising results, with hyaluronic acid injections leading to improvements in plaque size, penile curvature, and erectile function, and being well tolerated by patients. The findings suggest that HA injections could be a viable and safe treatment option for Peyronie’s disease, particularly in the early stages of the disease. However, more research is needed to determine the optimal dosage and treatment duration for HA injections, and to confirm its efficacy in the stable phase of Peyronie’s disease. Overall, hyaluronic acid is a potentially effective therapy for Peyronie’s disease, with the ability to inhibit fibrosis and promote angiogenesis, and low risk of adverse effects, making it an attractive option for patients who are unable or unwilling to undergo surgery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Andrology and Reproductive Health)
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