Special Issue "Selected Papers from the Conference “The Future of Education and Youth Work: Approaches and Practices around the World”"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Joanna Simos

Arcadia University Athens, Empedokleous 26, Athens 11636, Attica
Website | E-Mail
Interests: psychology; experiential education; intercultural studies; learning-by-doing skills

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Youth Work initiatives appeared during the Industrial Revolution and the 19th urban concentration. They were organized activities, aiming to instil values and principles to young people living in big towns. In these early times, Youth Work was faith-based, or based around military values. Since that time, there has been enormous growth and tremendous changes in the field. In one way or another, Youth Work activities are organized and implemented all around the world. In addition, philosophies, aims and objectives of Youth Work practices are context-dependent and more diverse than ever. On the one hand, the term Youth Work, although significantly controversial and open to interpretation, offers a minimum of universal understanding. On the other, Youth Work is still far from a common definition among different contexts.

Diverse social, political and historical realities of each community, country and region, shape differences in Youth Work conceptualization and practice around the world. In the theoretical domain, historical and cultural realities define the way in which policy-makers, stakeholders and citizens perceive Youth Work. In the field, the planning and implementation of Youth Work activities, depend on the local, national or regional needs of young people. Moreover, capacities of providers and receivers of Youth Work, determine the methods and tools used for the activities.

The aims of the conference are: (1) To analyze different definitions of Youth Work; (2) to offer space to anthropological approaches to Youth Work; (3) to host the presentation of distinct Youth Work practices; (4) to facilitate a debate on various field work experiences from different contexts; (5) to juxtapose practitioners’ and researchers’ perspectives; (6) to consider comparative macro, meso and micro analyses on Youth Work theories, policies, practices and challenges; and (7) to bring together approaches by project managers and trainers from the field of youth.

*The Mission Responsible Project is co-funded by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union.

Dr. Joanna Simos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • African Youth Work approaches: theory and practice
  • Asian Youth Work approaches: theory and practice
  • Anthropological approaches to Youth Work practices
  • Comparative Youth Work analyses
  • Faith-based Youth Work
  • Histories of Youth Work
  • Interdisciplinary approaches to Youth Work
  • Political approaches to Youth Work
  • Project Management models for Youth Work
  • Psychology and Youth Work
  • Public Policies and Youth
  • Social Approaches
  • Social Policies for Youth
  • Syntheses of Youth Work Strategies
  • Theorising on Youth Work
  • Youth Work Best Practices exchange in a globalised world
  • Youth Work methods and learning tools case studies
  • Other innovative approaches to Youth Work

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Youth Work and Serendipity: Some Anthropological Implications
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7030045
Received: 31 December 2017 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
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Abstract
This article explores the anthropological notion and methodology of serendipity as applied to youth work and non-formal education training methods. I introduce the term and its uses by drawing connections to the concept of ethnographic fieldwork and strategy to approach anthropological contexts. I [...] Read more.
This article explores the anthropological notion and methodology of serendipity as applied to youth work and non-formal education training methods. I introduce the term and its uses by drawing connections to the concept of ethnographic fieldwork and strategy to approach anthropological contexts. I then draw a parallel between the role of the anthropologist and the youth worker. I investigate the different options when dealing with groups and facing the contradictions of conducting fieldwork or trainings. Thus, I propose a distinction between the anthropological concept of ‘serendipity’ and the youth work-related concept of ‘improvisation’. I present ambiguous cases of the serendipity process and their implications based on my own direct experience of involvement with youth work through the methodology of autoethnography. Finally, I address different perspectives of serendipity seen as a storytelling construction. Ultimately, I draw useful conclusions on the understanding of serendipity and improvisation in the two contexts. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Youth Work in Turkey: A Sector Newly Emerging and Marked by Political Competition
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7020031
Received: 23 January 2018 / Revised: 13 February 2018 / Accepted: 21 February 2018 / Published: 24 February 2018
PDF Full-text (226 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Youth work is a very recent field in Turkey and the evolution of the field has been very much influenced by the European institutions, especially with the European Union candidacy process of Turkey. Youth work in Turkey can be analyzed in three different [...] Read more.
Youth work is a very recent field in Turkey and the evolution of the field has been very much influenced by the European institutions, especially with the European Union candidacy process of Turkey. Youth work in Turkey can be analyzed in three different layers since the central government, local government (municipalities) and civil society organization all have youth work activities. During our Horizon 2020 PARTISPACE research project, we conducted ethnographic research to shed light on the local characteristics of youth work in a central Anatolian city in Turkey. The cases we discuss in the scope of this paper based on our ethnographic research includes two youth centers, one run by a central government agency, the Ministry of Youth and Sports, the other by a local municipality run by the party of opposition. The study reveals the influence of local dynamics and political competition in the development of youth policy and youth work. Our research demonstrates that, even if youth work is not a priority in the public policy agenda, it has become an object of political competition in Turkey. Full article
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