Special Issue "Health Promotion, Public Health, and Built Environment"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Andrew Barnfield
Website
Guest Editor
School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol, BS8 1QU, UK
Interests: Health Inequalities; Public Health;Built Environment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Health is affected by the built environment in a range of different ways. This includes access to green space, fresh food, secure housing, safe transport, and decent jobs. The UN has emphasised the interconnection between health and the built environment in their Sustainable Development Goals by outlining that health promotion efforts can contribute by making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable (SDG 11).

The growing knowledge of the role of the built environments on health and wellbeing is underscored by the origins of urban planning and public health as a joint discipline. Health promotion further underscores the need to promote health and prevent disease through interventions, programmes and designs that must tackle the causes of ill health across multiple levels and contexts. Therefore, the built environment does offer opportunities to establish healthy, equitable and resilient communities. 

Despite such knowledge, the built environment stills negatively affects the health of inhabitants and the health of disadvantaged people even more so. For this Special Issue on “Health Promotion, Public Health, and Built Environment”, we invite you to submit practical, theoretical or speculative papers that seek to explore the many and varied affects the built environment has on health and wellbeing for all. We seek diverse examples drawn from across towns, cities, regions and countries throughout the world. We would like to know what works, where and for whom.

Dr. Andrew Barnfield
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • design
  • health
  • housing
  • planning
  • prevention
  • promotion
  • urban
  • transport

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Grounded Theory as an Approach for Exploring the Effect of Cultural Memory on Psychosocial Well-Being in Historic Urban Landscapes
Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(12), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9120219 - 27 Nov 2020
Abstract
Although grounded theory (GT) has emerged as a popular research approach across multiple areas of social science, it has been less widely taken up by researchers working in the fields of urban planning and design. The application of GT enables uniquely innovative insights [...] Read more.
Although grounded theory (GT) has emerged as a popular research approach across multiple areas of social science, it has been less widely taken up by researchers working in the fields of urban planning and design. The application of GT enables uniquely innovative insights to be gained from qualitative data, but it has attracted criticism and brings its own challenges. This paper proposes a methodology that could be applied by other researchers in the field of urban research. Utilising constructivist GT as a qualitative approach, this research investigates how cultural memory impacts the psychosocial well-being and quality of life (QoL) of users of, and visitors to, historic urban landscapes (HULs). Based on the findings, it can be posited that the application of GT yields a rich and nuanced understanding of how users of HULs experience the settings in which they live, and the impact and significance on human psychosocial well-being of the cultural memories incarnated within such settings. The current paper also contends that GT enables researchers studying the built environment to construct inductively based theories. Lastly, the practical implications of developing GT for application to HUL management are discussed, both in regard to how users experience the contexts in which they live and the impact of such contexts on well-being and quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion, Public Health, and Built Environment)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Socio-Spatial Approach to Enable Inclusive Well-Being in Cities: A Case Study of Birmingham, UK
Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(6), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9060109 - 23 Jun 2020
Abstract
This article examines density and deprivation, the two important parameters that define health and well-being in cities. Discussions are drawn from a case study conducted in Birmingham in four neighborhoods characterized by their different population density and deprivation levels. Data were collected through [...] Read more.
This article examines density and deprivation, the two important parameters that define health and well-being in cities. Discussions are drawn from a case study conducted in Birmingham in four neighborhoods characterized by their different population density and deprivation levels. Data were collected through questionnaires developed from a set of subjective well-being measures and built environment audits, based on the Irvine Minnesota Inventory that evaluates the quality of streets and walkability in neighborhoods. The inferences from the study support the need for linking health, planning, policy and design research and decision-making to the socio-spatial practices of people, impacting well-being at the everyday level. The findings provide a holistic approach health and well-being research and suggests a conceptual framework for inclusive well-being in cities, which signifies the role of social and spatial parameters in determining peoples’ health and well-being. The study also highlights the lack of interdisciplinary research in understanding the association between well-being and social and behavioral practices in diverse communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion, Public Health, and Built Environment)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
‘The Feel of the Stones, Sounds of Cars, the Different Smells’: How Incorporating the Senses Can Help Support Equitable Health Promotion
Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(6), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9060108 - 23 Jun 2020
Abstract
There has been limited consideration to the role of the senses in health promotion regardless of the prominence placed on corporeality in intervention and prevention strategies. Touch as a form of sense-making challenges the representational approaches that characterize health promotion methods to increase [...] Read more.
There has been limited consideration to the role of the senses in health promotion regardless of the prominence placed on corporeality in intervention and prevention strategies. Touch as a form of sense-making challenges the representational approaches that characterize health promotion methods to increase participation in physical activity. This paper explores recreational running practices through the sense of touch and is drawn from an in-depth qualitative research project with recreational runners in the Bulgarian capital Sofia. The project examined how recreational running was established and maintained within the city. This paper concludes that there is potential for health promotion to adopt a more open stance towards the study of sensual experiences of the built environment. Insights from approaches attentive to the senses hold promise for agendas and interventions in health promotion practice and intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion, Public Health, and Built Environment)
Back to TopTop