Special Issue "Intersectionality: Disentangling the Complexity of Inequality"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Katrina Bell McDonald

Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-410-516-7626
Interests: sociology of the family; race, class, and gender; intersectionality; race relations; qualitative methodology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

 

This issue will investigate how intersectionality is being applied to address 21st century phenomena of inequality, given the changing dynamics of such things as racism and sexism. It seeks research that places race, gender, and class at its bedrock, even if that research integrates one or more other axes of social difference. The intellectual works of this volume conceive of intersectionality as the multiplicity of social positions held by a group of people or as the capacity of multiple forms of oppression to simultaneously subjugate. Ultimately, these contributions explicate just how these intersections bare upon the freedoms, opportunities and outcomes of people contemporarily.

This volume will be situated among the vast number of books and articles written on the subject of intersectionality, but will consist of a collection of works that focus on this time in history, and that attempt to project into the future.

Dr. Katrina Bell McDonald
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • social inequality
  • racism
  • classism
  • ethnicity
  • sexism
  • feminist theory
  • identity
  • oppression

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
It’s All about the Children: An Intersectional Perspective on Parenting Values among Black Married Couples in the United States
Societies 2015, 5(4), 855-871; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5040855
Received: 25 August 2015 / Revised: 10 November 2015 / Accepted: 24 November 2015 / Published: 15 December 2015
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Abstract
Black families in the United States are usually studied from a deficit perspective that primarily considers single parents in poverty. There is, however, considerable diversity among American Black families in terms of social class, immigration status, marital status, and parenting values and practices. [...] Read more.
Black families in the United States are usually studied from a deficit perspective that primarily considers single parents in poverty. There is, however, considerable diversity among American Black families in terms of social class, immigration status, marital status, and parenting values and practices. Using data from the Contemporary Black Marriage Study, a study of young married couples who are native-born Black, African immigrants, or Caribbean immigrants, this research examines childbearing and parenting values from an intersectional perspective. A sample of whites is included for comparison purposes. The research considers impacts of social class, immigration, gender, and race as well as structural influences. Diversity exists both within and among social and demographic groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intersectionality: Disentangling the Complexity of Inequality)
Open AccessArticle
Aging and Resilience: Older Women’s Responses to Change and Adversity
Societies 2015, 5(4), 760-777; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5040760
Received: 1 June 2015 / Revised: 17 October 2015 / Accepted: 11 November 2015 / Published: 17 November 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (688 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The primary objective of the qualitative study was to describe women’s resilience in older adulthood according to older women’s interpretations of their experiences and the contexts of their lives. Intersectionality and critical feminist gerontology served as theoretical frameworks for examining, interpreting and highlighted [...] Read more.
The primary objective of the qualitative study was to describe women’s resilience in older adulthood according to older women’s interpretations of their experiences and the contexts of their lives. Intersectionality and critical feminist gerontology served as theoretical frameworks for examining, interpreting and highlighted the dynamic nature of intersecting identities and the interrelationships between identity and contextual factors. Constructivist grounded theory methodology was used to identify themes that represent older women’s subjective interpretations of their experiences with adversity and to construct definitions of resilience based on their experiences. The aspects of identity that women in the study associated with their experiences of adversity and their resilience were age, physical and mental health, marital status and income. Women in the study emphasized how subjective interpretations influenced the meaning they associated with events, circumstances, or changes that accompanied aging and their understanding of the role of identities in those experiences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intersectionality: Disentangling the Complexity of Inequality)
Open AccessArticle
Sexual Violence, Race and Media (In)Visibility: Intersectional Complexities in a Transnational Frame
Societies 2015, 5(3), 598-617; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5030598
Received: 26 May 2015 / Revised: 27 July 2015 / Accepted: 28 July 2015 / Published: 10 August 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (241 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Intersectional scholarship argues that women of color have distinct experiences of rape compared to white women and highlights their relative invisibility as victims compared to white women victims in news media. While the bulk of intersectional work has examined such issues within one [...] Read more.
Intersectional scholarship argues that women of color have distinct experiences of rape compared to white women and highlights their relative invisibility as victims compared to white women victims in news media. While the bulk of intersectional work has examined such issues within one nation and particularly within the US, in an era of increasingly transnationalized media content, we explore such intersectionalities in a transnational frame. That is, we explore the treatment of the rape of a local Indian woman in New Delhi, India, and the rape of a white woman in Steubenville, USA, in the New York Times and the Times of India. We find that contra assumptions in the intersectional literature, the racialized Indian victim is hyper-visible across both papers while the white US victim is relatively invisible. Situating both newspapers within the global histories of the development of news as a particular genre of storytelling, we argue that their respective locations within larger processes shaped by colonial, imperial and neo-colonial histories have critical implications for the coverage each paper offers. Thus, we argue that issues of race and visibility in media operate very differently depending on the space and scale of analysis. In an increasingly globalized world, then, we must start paying attention to the transnational and its implications for rape, race and (in)visibility in news media. Ultimately, our approach brings together processes of racialization at multiple scales—both below the nation and above the nation—to offer a more complex, multi-scalar understanding of how racialization processes impact rape coverage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intersectionality: Disentangling the Complexity of Inequality)
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Open AccessEssay
Reel Royal Diversity? The Glass Ceiling in Disney’s Mulan and Princess and the Frog
Societies 2016, 6(4), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc6040035
Received: 8 October 2016 / Revised: 14 December 2016 / Accepted: 15 December 2016 / Published: 17 December 2016
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (217 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Both in Mulan and Princess and the Frog, Disney eschews a traditional fairytale ending involving palatial opulence by substituting an alternative narrative for women of color. Mulan disguises herself as a male soldier in order to serve in her father’s place. After [...] Read more.
Both in Mulan and Princess and the Frog, Disney eschews a traditional fairytale ending involving palatial opulence by substituting an alternative narrative for women of color. Mulan disguises herself as a male soldier in order to serve in her father’s place. After sharing victory with male companions, she willingly returns home to domesticity and the confines imposed by her gender. Tiana spends two thirds of the movie as a frog, substantially limiting her on-screen time as an African American female. Like Mulan, she is driven to please her father. She fulfills his dream of owning a high-end restaurant, ironically named Tiana’s Palace, the closest she comes to a royal lifestyle. Although protagonists with more realistic lives could potentially enhance viewers’ connection with them and model a work ethic or commitment to home life, the standard and more financially successful Disney narrative immerses viewers in a fantasy world of endless prospects including a life of royalty. These nonwhite heroines instead display a willingness to settle for more modest aspirations in stories replete with stereotypical gender and race-bound tropes. This divergent narrative suggests that protagonists of color are not entitled to a life of leisure and privilege that white Disney princesses enjoy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intersectionality: Disentangling the Complexity of Inequality)
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