Special Issue "Rethinking Racial Identity Politics: Group Conflict, Compromise, and Competition"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Tyson King-Meadows
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Political Science Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD, 21250, USA
Interests: voting rights in America; redistricting; race and election law; racial jurisprudence; federalism; civic participation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The phrase "racial identity politics" has long engendered consternation, applause, and skepticism from scholars, activists, and media personalities alike. From warnings that there is no biological basis for race and that identity group expectations are as liberating as they are restricting; to praise for the ways in which strong racial identification mitigates the negative cognitive and emotive effects of microaggressions; to debates about whether public policies appropriately balance freedom of disassociation against equal protection and freedom of speech, research on racial identity politics has generated much insight about group conflict, compromise, and competition. However, the increasing complexity of governing in the twenty-first century demands new examinations into the perils and promises of racial identity politics.

For this purpose, this Special Issue of Societies invites manuscripts of original research that examine the effects of racial identity politics on governance in contemporary heterogeneous societies. We welcome submissions that employ any variety of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method approaches. Studies may be comparative and may be specific to a region, nation, state, or sub-state area. We especially welcome manuscripts that address the following: public policy debates where the racial identity of advocates or opponents is a factor in how debate is framed or understood (e.g., housing, immigration, policing, health care, land use, education reforms); connections between racial identity politics and the quality of democracy; linkages between racial identity and political attitudes or behavior; how racial identity politics can both facilitate and undermine social subordination; and how racial identity politics relates to the formation, maintenance, or collapse of organizations and networks. The article processing charges (APC) are waived for this Special Issue.

Prof. Tyson King-Meadows
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • black immigrants
  • North America
  • perception of criminal in/justice
  • police-black civilian deadly encounter
  • racial minorities

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Perceptual Knots and Black Identity Politics: Linked Fate, American Heritage, and Support for Trump Era Immigration Policy
Societies 2019, 9(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc9010011 - 29 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Since the 2016 U.S. presidential election, much ado has been made about how racial anxiety fueled White vote choice for Donald Trump. Far less empirical attention has been paid to whether the 2016 election cycle triggered black anxieties and if those anxieties led [...] Read more.
Since the 2016 U.S. presidential election, much ado has been made about how racial anxiety fueled White vote choice for Donald Trump. Far less empirical attention has been paid to whether the 2016 election cycle triggered black anxieties and if those anxieties led blacks to reevaluate their communities’ standing relative to Latinos and immigrants. Employing data from the 2016 Collaborative Multiracial Post-Election Survey, we examine the extent to which race consciousness both coexists with black perceptions of Latinos and shapes black support for anti-immigrant legislation. Our results address how the conflation of Latino with undocumented immigrant may have activated a perceptional and policy backlash amongst black voters. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Status Change Model of Interethnic Riots
Societies 2018, 8(4), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc8040110 - 08 Nov 2018
Abstract
The status change riot model opens up a new avenue of riot explanation. One that takes into consideration ethnic group relations and factors of group status and honor—i.e., dignity. The riot model asserts that the potential for a riot arises when new and [...] Read more.
The status change riot model opens up a new avenue of riot explanation. One that takes into consideration ethnic group relations and factors of group status and honor—i.e., dignity. The riot model asserts that the potential for a riot arises when new and old concepts about group statuses, and as such, ideas about appropriate intergroup behaviors, give rise to disputative intergroup interactions. The model affirms that a trigger event either by itself or in accumulation with other events drives actors to a dignity threshold that prompts them to riot. The model further relates that, once started, a riot will follow a general riot pattern that ends in either a status resolution or an increased strain in ethnic group relations. Full article
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