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Perceptual Knots and Black Identity Politics: Linked Fate, American Heritage, and Support for Trump Era Immigration Policy

1
Department of Political Science, Howard University, Washington, DC 20059, USA
2
Department of Political Science, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Societies 2019, 9(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc9010011
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 3 January 2019 / Accepted: 23 January 2019 / Published: 29 January 2019
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Abstract

Since the 2016 U.S. presidential election, much ado has been made about how racial anxiety fueled White vote choice for Donald Trump. Far less empirical attention has been paid to whether the 2016 election cycle triggered black anxieties and if those anxieties led blacks to reevaluate their communities’ standing relative to Latinos and immigrants. Employing data from the 2016 Collaborative Multiracial Post-Election Survey, we examine the extent to which race consciousness both coexists with black perceptions of Latinos and shapes black support for anti-immigrant legislation. Our results address how the conflation of Latino with undocumented immigrant may have activated a perceptional and policy backlash amongst black voters. View Full-Text
Keywords: immigration policy; black public opinion; anti-Latino attitudes; 2016 presidential election immigration policy; black public opinion; anti-Latino attitudes; 2016 presidential election
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Carter, N.M.; King-Meadows, T.D. Perceptual Knots and Black Identity Politics: Linked Fate, American Heritage, and Support for Trump Era Immigration Policy. Societies 2019, 9, 11.

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