Special Issue "Families, Work and Well-being"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Deborah Stienstra Website E-Mail
Director of the Live Work Well Research Centre/ Jarislowsky Chair in Families and Work, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
Interests: disability studies, public policy analysis, intersectionality, gender/feminist analysis, indigenousness; childhood and disability; end of life care; health policy; resource development policy; political economy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite manuscript submissions for a special issue exploring the interconnections between and among diverse forms of families, challenges as a result of changing forms of work and livelihoods, and how these affect individual’s, families’ and communities’ well-being. This special issue invites authors to begin from the perspectives of those who have often been at the margins in discussions of families and work.  In particular, we invite submissions that explore:

-experiences of changes in caregiving by those often identified as care recipients (people with disabilities, young carers) and implications of changes in caregiving over the life course;

-implications of precarious work among young people, their families and those from racialized communities;

-how sexual and gender diversity can challenge employee benefits, working conditions and policies, and work itself;

-examples of how other forms of livelihoods (or obtaining the means to sustain life through barter, artistry, berry-picking etc.) challenge, contradict and/or support paid work;

-how diverse cultural understandings of families, work and well-being, including Indigenous approaches, challenge and expand current work-family research;

-how changing communities as a result of climate change, resource extraction and other factors alter the ways we understand work, families and well-being

Prof. Deborah Stienstra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Assessment of How House Ownership Shapes Health Outcomes in Urban Ghana
Societies 2019, 9(2), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc9020043 - 30 May 2019
Abstract
Background: This study investigates home ownership and its apparent health outcomes in Urban Ghana, utilizing both quantitative and qualitative datasets. Methods: The sample for the study consisted of 442 respondents using a multi-stage sampling technique. Results: The context in which houses are situated [...] Read more.
Background: This study investigates home ownership and its apparent health outcomes in Urban Ghana, utilizing both quantitative and qualitative datasets. Methods: The sample for the study consisted of 442 respondents using a multi-stage sampling technique. Results: The context in which houses are situated affects social support networks, physical and mental health outcomes. House ownership is then a precondition that enables social contact within neighborhoods. A Cramer’s V test value of 0.750 suggests a strong association between house ownership and health outcomes. Conclusion: House acquisition and ownership can potentially improve overall physical, and mental health and wellbeing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Families, Work and Well-being)
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