Special Issue "Religion in Latin America, and among Latinos abroad."

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gustavo Morello SJ

Sociology Department, Boston College, McGuinn 422, 140 Commonwealth Ave, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Latin America; Lived Religion; Modernity; Catholicism; Political sociology; Religious Pluralization; Secularization

Special Issue Information

Studies about religion in Latin America have been growing in recent years (Morello, Romero, Rabbia, De Costa 2017; De la Torre and Martin 2017). However, they tend to be either historical research or about theoretical issues. In other cases, even when the research is based on empirical current data, the articles are missing the connection with the broader Latin American religious situation. In this special issue, we are inviting colleagues to submit empirical based papers on current topics, that explicitly contribute to paint the broader picture of Latin Americans religiosity at home and abroad.

Dear Colleagues,

As you surely know for your work on the field of ‘religion and Latin America’, there is an ongoing debate about a theoretical model that permits understand the religious live of the continent. While some scholars will frame the discussion either with the Secularization theory or the Rational choice, others prefer ‘Popular Religiosity’ as a construct more suitable to name the particularities of the religious situation among Latinos in Latin America and abroad.

That discussions have placed the emphasis on religious institutions, assuming that people practice what the institutions requires. Other times, articles focused on a case study have had difficulties to apply the ‘sociological imagination’ (Mills), that is to explain why studying a particular situation (from any theoretical framework) is important to understand Latin American religiosity. Studies that deal with a ‘story’ have had some problems link it to Latin American religious ‘history’. Usually articles lack of references of any literature written in a language other than the one of the paper.

This is invitation is for you to consider writing a paper on Latin America of about [email protected] contemporary religious situation. To fulfill the aforementioned gaps, papers should focus on current issues, even when they might have a historical introduction of the case for a wider readership. (I expect that contextual element does not go beyond 1,000 words). The paper should be based on empirical research. I am not naïve about ‘empirical data’, I understand we built our data based on theoretical preferences. However, I do think we need more empirically based analysis to understand what is going on in the Latin American religious field. It can be about any religious traditions, employ any methodological approach (qualitative, quantitative, mix methods), any analytical level (individuals, communities, institutions) and about any intersection, like in ‘religion and…’ (gender, race, politics, mass media, work, education, et cetera). Finally, I hope you can explicitly make the case connecting your specific study with the broader picture: how is your research relevant to the knowledge of Latin Americans’ religiosity? What knowledge does it bring to the discussion?

If you agree to participate in this special issue, I ask you please to send us a tentative title by January 30, 2017 and an abstract by March 1, 2018. The article can be coauthored with your colleagues. When you send the abstract, please make explicit the questions that you will try to answer or the hypothesis you plan to explore. Also explain the methodologies you’re going to use to answer your questions/hypothesis. The deadline for the paper is December 1st 2019. However, if possible I’d like to have a draft version by July 1st, 2019 so I can work on an introduction that discusses the articles of the special issue.

Prof. Dr. Gustavo Morello SJ
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Religiosity
  • Secularization
  • Gender
  • Pluralism
  • Lived Religion
  • Violence
  • Social Movements
  • Social Forces
  • Embodiment
  • Materiality
  • Participation
  • Membership
  • State
  • Politics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Gender and Space during Guatemala’s Holy Week: An Ethnographic Account
Religions 2019, 10(2), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10020076
Received: 13 November 2018 / Revised: 16 January 2019 / Accepted: 17 January 2019 / Published: 23 January 2019
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Abstract
At midnight of Sunday, 9 April 2017, the Sunday known as Palm Sunday during Holy Week (Semana Santa), the streets of Guatemala City were packed with parishioners, passers-by, and strollers watching the procession of Jesús Nazareno de los Milagros, “King [...] Read more.
At midnight of Sunday, 9 April 2017, the Sunday known as Palm Sunday during Holy Week (Semana Santa), the streets of Guatemala City were packed with parishioners, passers-by, and strollers watching the procession of Jesús Nazareno de los Milagros, “King of the Universe”. The procession’s itinerary takes almost eighteen hours to complete and it is one of the most popular processions among Catholics in Guatemala. What was I, a female anthropologist taking notes and pictures, doing as part of the entourage of the image of Jesus? The question is not gratuitous because this specific space, namely, the entourage itself, is reserved exclusively for male bearers, the so-called cucuruchos. This ethnographic incursion took place within the framework of an ongoing research project on the construction of gender subjectivities in urban religious spaces in Guatemala City, a project that attempts to answer larger questions on the various processes of subject formation within religious spaces. In this article, however, I will focus exclusively on the construction of gender subjectivities during the celebration of the Holy Week in Guatemala City. This paper discusses how a religious space can be analyzed as a “place of encounter” that will intensify social relations coming from beyond, and going beyond, the processional space itself. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion in Latin America, and among Latinos abroad.)
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Open AccessArticle Pentecostals, Gender Ideology and the Peace Plebiscite: Colombia 2016
Religions 2018, 9(12), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9120418
Received: 13 November 2018 / Revised: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 14 December 2018 / Published: 16 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (376 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Correction
Abstract
This article examines the role of the Pentecostal Evangelical movement in the success of the ‘No’ campaign in the Colombian peace plebiscite of 2 October 2016, where Colombians voted to reject the peace agreement which had been reached between the Colombian government and [...] Read more.
This article examines the role of the Pentecostal Evangelical movement in the success of the ‘No’ campaign in the Colombian peace plebiscite of 2 October 2016, where Colombians voted to reject the peace agreement which had been reached between the Colombian government and the Armed Revolutionary Forces of Colombia (FARC). It discusses the reasons that motivated large sectors of the Evangelical electorate to oppose the agreement, paying particular attention to the success of the argument that the agreement was contaminated with what Pentecostals termed ‘gender ideology.’ In terms of methodology, the article draws on a variety of sources, including interviews, field observation and written sources both scholarly and popular, including press and Internet articles. We track how ‘gender’ comes to be shorthand for the host of social ills with which it was associated during the debates around the Colombian peace plebiscite through use of the term ‘gender ideology’. We posit that it is the links between ‘gender’ modernity, colonialism and the development industry, its academic, value-neutral quality and its status as an isolated technical term that allow ‘gender’ to become a proxy for a wide range of social dissatisfactions. We conclude that the success of the ‘No’ campaign was possible due to the convergence of several sectors of society, particularly between the political right and a social movement which, inspired by religious values, opposed the recognition of LGBTI (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex) rights and the use of the term ‘gender’ in the agreements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion in Latin America, and among Latinos abroad.)
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