Special Issue "The Historical Interaction between Nationalism and Christian Theology"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444). This special issue belongs to the section "Religions and Theologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. John D. Wilsey
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, KY 40280, USA
Interests: the historical interaction between nationalism and Christian theology; the history of ideas in the Christian west
Dr. Mark T. Edwards
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of History, Political Economy, Geography, and Social Studies, Spring Arbor University, Spring Arbor, MI 49283, USA
Interests: twentieth-century U.S. history; American intellectual, religious, and diplomatic history
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In their book Taking America Back for God, Andrew Whitehead and Samuel Perry define Christian nationalism as a "cultural framework that blurs distinctions between Christian identity and American identity, viewing the two as closely related and seeking to enhance and preserve their union." They argue that all Americans see the world through Christian nationalism, and their responses to the world often are dependent on whether they accept or reject the idea.

In 1977, a book entitled The Light and the Glory: 1492-1793, authored by Peter Marshall and David Manuel, was published. The book resonated deeply with evangelicals, and continues to do so almost forty years later. Since 1977, Christian nationalism has been most closely associated with evangelicals, but as Whitehead and Perry write, "being an evangelical . . . tells us almost nothing about a person's social attitudes or behavior once Christian nationalism has been considered." In other words, while there is often overlap between evangelicalism and Christian nationalism, the two sets of ideas are not dependent upon each other.

Furthermore, Americans have no monopoly on Christian nationalism. This Special Issue of Religions will feature articles that offer perspectives on the exchanges between nationalism and theology across a range of historical and ethnic contexts broader than the standard white evangelical paradigm, which has been commonly assumed for the past five decades.

Dr. John D. Wilsey
Dr. Mark Edwards
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nationalism
  • religion
  • identity
  • culture
  • Christianity
  • theology
  • church
  • state

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Revenge Is a Genre Best Served Old: Apocalypse in Christian Right Literature and Politics
Religions 2022, 13(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13010021 - 27 Dec 2021
Viewed by 274
Abstract
Apocalypse is a phenomenology of disorder that entails a range of religious affects and experiences largely outside normative expectations of benevolent religion. Vindication, judgment, revenge, resentment, righteous hatred of one’s enemies, the wish for their imminent destruction, theological certainty, the triumphant display of [...] Read more.
Apocalypse is a phenomenology of disorder that entails a range of religious affects and experiences largely outside normative expectations of benevolent religion. Vindication, judgment, revenge, resentment, righteous hatred of one’s enemies, the wish for their imminent destruction, theological certainty, the triumphant display of right authority, right judgement, and just punishment—these are the primary affects. As a literary genre and a worldview, apocalypse characterizes both the most famous example of evangelical fiction—the Left Behind series by Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins—and the U.S. Christian Right’s politics. This article’s methodological contribution is to return us to the beginnings of apocalypse in Biblical and parabiblical literature to better understand the questions of theodicy that Left Behind renews in unexpected ways. Conservative white Christians use apocalypse to articulate their experience as God’s chosen but persecuted people in a diversely populated cosmos, wherein their political foes are the enemies of God. However strange the supersessionist appropriation, apocalypse shapes their understanding of why God lets them suffer so—and may also signal an underlying fear about the power and attention of their deity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Historical Interaction between Nationalism and Christian Theology)
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