Recent Perspectives Regarding Muscle and Exercise Training

A special issue of Muscles (ISSN 2813-0413).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 6117

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculdade de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Diamantina 39100-000, Brazil
Interests: physical exercise; chronic conditions; biomarkers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of this Special Issue is to specify the principles of physiology, functional anatomy and biomechanics to explore and understand muscle problems. This could be augmented human research focusing on the understanding of muscle and exercise training in the context of health, sport and at work. Our objective is to summarize the most important parameters of muscle physiology influencing functional balance or muscle performance related to the health sciences for all age groups, throughout their lives. We encourage papers aiming to promote the latest research in the fields of health, quality of life improvement, and sport rehabilitation, and to summarize the better recommendations. We are also interested in manuscripts working towards the prevention of functional decline and frailty following a life-course perspective through the utilization of the latest research applied to health in general as well as applicative works targeted to all stages of life aimed at disease prevention, improved performance and disease management. Of further interest is the modelling, simulation, quantification and computation of the musculoskeletal system, permitting quantification and improving the discriminate parameters characterizing movement in different cases (e.g., sport, work and daily life). The overall aim of this Special Issue is to effectively combine and coordinate research and results in order to understand recent perspectives regarding muscle and exercise training.

Dr. Ana Cristina Rodrigues Lacerda
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Muscles is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human behavior
  • musculoskeletal disorders
  • rehabilitation
  • healthcare
  • musculoskeletal system
  • exercise training
  • muscle physiology
  • augmented human
  • muscle problems
  • sport
  • quality of life
  • sport science
  • sport medicine

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1021 KiB  
Article
The Chronic Effect of Stair Climbing–Descending Exercises after Meals on Glycemic Control in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial
by Hiroto Honda, Hiromi Fukutomi, Makoto Igaki, Shinichiro Tanaka, Tetsuo Takaishi and Tatsuya Hayashi
Muscles 2023, 2(2), 238-249; https://doi.org/10.3390/muscles2020018 - 15 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1400
Abstract
This study aimed to examine the chronic effect of a stair climbing–descending exercise (ST-EX) program on glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Sixteen T2D participants were randomly divided into two groups and followed up over 12 weeks: they either performed [...] Read more.
This study aimed to examine the chronic effect of a stair climbing–descending exercise (ST-EX) program on glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Sixteen T2D participants were randomly divided into two groups and followed up over 12 weeks: they either performed regular ST-EX after meals at home (n = 8) or maintained their daily routine (CON; no training) (n = 8). The participants in the ST-EX group were instructed to perform a minimum of 12 sessions/week of ST-EX for more than three days/week. One session of ST-EX consisted of two repetitions of 3 min bouts of climbing to the second floor, followed by walking down to the first floor. Fourteen participants completed the study (seven for each group). The decrease in glycoalbumin levels was significantly greater in the ST-EX group (mean value: −1.0%) than in the CON group (+0.4%). Moreover, the knee extension force increased greatly in the ST-EX group (+0.2 Nm/kg) compared with that in the CON group (−0.1 Nm/kg), with no significant change in the skeletal muscle mass. Performing regular ST-EX after meals may be an effective strategy to improve glycemic control and lower-extremity muscle strength in individuals with T2D. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Perspectives Regarding Muscle and Exercise Training)
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10 pages, 1482 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Muscle Strength and Electromyographic Activity during Different Deadlift Positions
by Vinícius Marques Moreira, Leonardo Coelho Rabello de Lima, Arnaldo Luis Mortatti, Thiago Mattos Frota de Souza, Fernando Vitor Lima, Saulo Fernandes Melo Oliveira, Christian Emmanuel Torres Cabido, Felipe J. Aidar, Manoel da Cunha Costa, Thiago Pires, Tatiana Acioli, Rogério César Fermino, Cláudio Oliveira Assumpção and Túlio Banja
Muscles 2023, 2(2), 218-227; https://doi.org/10.3390/muscles2020016 - 8 May 2023
Viewed by 2411
Abstract
The aim of the study was to analyze muscle activation in the three positions of the deadlift (DL). Twenty male participants (33.4 ± 3.9 years; 42.2 ± 9.1 months of experience with DL; 91.0 ± 14.8 kg; and 1.78 ± 0.06 m) pulled [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to analyze muscle activation in the three positions of the deadlift (DL). Twenty male participants (33.4 ± 3.9 years; 42.2 ± 9.1 months of experience with DL; 91.0 ± 14.8 kg; and 1.78 ± 0.06 m) pulled a bar through isometric actions in three DL positions: lift-off, mid-pull, and lockout. Isometric strength, knee angle, and activation of the rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), lateral gastrocnemius (GAL), and erector spinae (ERE) muscles were collected. The analysis of variance showed that the maximum isometric force presented differences between the positions (p = 0.001; η2 = 0.973) considered large with higher values at the mid-pull position. Interactions were found between muscles and position (p = 0.001; η2 = 0.527) considered large. The RF and ERE showed greater activation in the lift-off position, while in the mid-pull position, there was greater activation of the BF and GAL muscles. The DL positions produce different activations in the bi-articular and uni-articular muscles. The lift-off requires more activation from the RF and ERE positions. The mid-pull position, despite generating greater force, presented greater activations in the BF and GAL. The ERE showed higher activations as the external torque was greater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Perspectives Regarding Muscle and Exercise Training)
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12 pages, 339 KiB  
Article
Physical Function Tests Are Potential Tools to Identify Low Physical Resilience in Women after Breast Cancer Treatment
by Fernanda Maria Martins, Anselmo Alves de Oliveira, Gersiel Oliveira-Júnior, Marcelo A. S. Carneiro, Luís Ronan Marquez Ferreira de Souza, Vitor Carvalho Lara, Rosekeila Simões Nomelini, Cláudio Oliveira Assumpção, Markus Vinícius Campos Souza and Fábio Lera Orsatti
Muscles 2023, 2(1), 97-108; https://doi.org/10.3390/muscles2010009 - 9 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1740
Abstract
Background: This study sought to investigate whether different physical function tests (objective measures of physical performance) may identify a low physical resilience in breast cancer survivors (BCS). Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study evaluated 146 BCS and 69 age-matched women without breast cancer history. [...] Read more.
Background: This study sought to investigate whether different physical function tests (objective measures of physical performance) may identify a low physical resilience in breast cancer survivors (BCS). Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study evaluated 146 BCS and 69 age-matched women without breast cancer history. The different times after the end of treatment were used as criteria for group division. Participants were divided into four groups: control (CT: n = 69–women without breast cancer history); <1.0 years after the end of treatment (<1 YAT: n = 60); 1–3.9 years after the end of treatment (1–3.9 YAT: n = 45); and ≥4 years after the end of treatment (>4 YAT: n = 41). Physical function was evaluated by 4 m walk test (4-MWT), five-times-sit-to-stand test (FTSST), timed up and go test (TUG), and short physical performance battery (SPPB). Age, menopausal status, smoking, number of medications, level of physical activity, body mass index, and muscle strength were used as confounding variables in ANCOVA. Results: All groups that underwent cancer treatment (<1 YAT, 1–3.9 YAT and ≥4 YAT) had lower physical performance (p < 0.001) identified by 4 MWT, TUG, and FTSST when compared to the CT group. For the SPPB, the <1 YAT and ≥4 YAT groups had lower performance (p = 0.005) when compared to the CT. Conclusions: The different physical function tests can be used to identify a low physical resilience in BCS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Perspectives Regarding Muscle and Exercise Training)
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