Special Issue "Imaging Interaction in Surgery"

A special issue of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 February 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Helena M. Mentis
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Information Systems, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, United States
Interests: CSCW; gestural interaction; telemedicine
Dr. Ignacio Avellino
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Information Systems, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, United States
Interests: telemedicine; remote collaboration; robotic surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue explores multimodal interaction with imaging systems in the operating room (OR). The OR constitutes a specialized environment with unique challenges for interaction, for instance, the sterile barrier between the surgeon and the imaging system or the fact that such systems divide both the attention (cognitive) and the task space (physical) between the surgical procedure and the interaction. Multimodal techniques have the potential to enable interaction with imaging systems while performing surgery, as the surgeon can choose the suitable modality given the constraints of the current task at hand. Although different systems have implemented multimodal techniques, such as voice control, mid-air gestures, touch or foot pedals, in both research and industry, we are still a long way from understanding how these interplay with surgical tasks. The unique specificities of surgical tasks, the complex collaboration among the different parties, and the high stakes make it difficult to apply knowledge from other areas into the domain of surgery, and thus, there is a latent need to understand how multimodal interaction techniques impact this context-critical environment. Examples of imaging systems include pre-operative images, such as MRI, PET, or CT scans, and peri-operative images, such as live endoscopic video feeds or ultrasounds.

We welcome submissions of different types, including research articles, case studies, systematic reviews, literature reviews, theoretical and critical perspectives, and opinions on multimodal technologies for imaging systems in the OR. Example topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Novel interaction techniques;
  • Empirical studies on the impacts of multimodal technologies;
  • Contributions to the methodology for exploring interaction techniques;
  • Implications for the design of future interactive systems; and
  • Theoretical contributions that enlarge our understanding of interactions with existing or future multimodal technologies.

Dr. Helena M. Mentis
Dr. Ignacio Avellino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Role of Simulators in Interdisciplinary Medical Work
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2020, 4(4), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti4040090 - 08 Dec 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This article reports from a project introducing a virtual reality simulator with patient-specific input for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) into a surgical environment at a university hospital in Norway during 2016–2019. The project includes acquisition of the simulator, training of personnel, and a [...] Read more.
This article reports from a project introducing a virtual reality simulator with patient-specific input for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) into a surgical environment at a university hospital in Norway during 2016–2019. The project includes acquisition of the simulator, training of personnel, and a mapping of the effects. We followed the process, adopting ethnographic methods including participation in the operating room, simulated patient-specific rehearsals, preparations of the rehearsals, meetings with the simulator company, scientific meetings and scientific work related to the clinical trials (the second author led the clinical trial), in addition to open-ended interviews with vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists. We used the concepts of boundary work and sensework as conceptual lenses through which we studied the introduction of the simulator and how it influenced the nature of work and the professional relationship between the vascular surgeons and the interventional radiologists. We found that the simulator facilitated professional integration, at the same time as it served as a material resource for professional identity development. This study is the first to our knowledge that investigates the role of simulators for professional identity and relationship among surgeons and radiologists. Further studies of simulators in similar and different social contexts may contribute to deeper and more generic understanding of the way simulators influence our working life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging Interaction in Surgery)
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