Recent Advance in Targeted Therapy in Medicine

A special issue of Medicines (ISSN 2305-6320).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2015) | Viewed by 16110

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
Interests: Immunology, cancer immunotherapeutics, herbal medicines, chemometrics, flow cytometry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Targeted therapy has become one of the main cancer management modalities and is further developing at a rapid pace. The realm of target molecules is expanding; these targets concern carcinogenesis, cell cycle and tumour growth, angiogenesis, and tumour microenvironments. Currently, targets at the systemic level, such as signal transduction molecules, inflammatory cytokines, and their receptors, have also been identified. The original proposed advantage to these targets is that targeted therapy can be more effective than cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. At the same time, targeted therapy is expected to have a huge reduction in the undesirable side effects (compared with chemo-drug treatments’).

Targeted therapeutic agents have been designed and have been mainly used in clinic settings for a number of cancers (e.g., multiple myeloma, breast cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer, melanoma, lung cancer, liver cancer, brain tumors, ovarian cancer, and pancreatic cancers). There are different approaches for targeted therapy in cancer treatment, including utilizing inhibitors against certain specific molecules in signal transduction, tumor cell growth or angiogenesis; hormone therapies for hormone-sensitive tumors, and immunotherapies for specific cancer cells. The purpose of this Special Issue is to highlight our current knowledge on the clinical efficacy and side-effects of the various forms of targeted therapy in this endeavor of creating a "preferred" cancer management approach for the multiple cancer types mentioned above. The Special Issue will cover the following subtopics:

Subtopics covered:

  • Clinical Efficacy and Side Effects of Targeted therapy
  • Patient's Quality of Life in Using Targeted Therapy
  • Immunological Effects of Targeted Therapy
  • Nanocarriers as Novel Delivery Platforms for Targeted Therapy
  • Targeted Therapy Against Cancer Stem Cells
  • New Promising Molecular Targets for Therapeutics
  • New Molecular Target for Disease Diagnosis
  • Management of Target Drug Resistance

Dr. Daniel M.-Y. Sze
Dr. William Chi-shing Cho
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • targeted therapy
  • clinical efficacy
  • side effects
  • quality of life
  • immunological effects
  • nanocarrier
  • cancer stem cells
  • resistance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review
The Changing Landscape of Breast Cancer: How Biology Drives Therapy
by Sarah Friend and Melanie Royce
Medicines 2016, 3(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines3010002 - 21 Jan 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 6422
Abstract
Breast cancer is the most prevalent life-threatening cancer in women. Optimizing therapy to increase cure rates in early stage disease, and improving life expectancy and palliation for advanced stages, are goals driving major areas of research. The armamentarium of targeted treatments for breast [...] Read more.
Breast cancer is the most prevalent life-threatening cancer in women. Optimizing therapy to increase cure rates in early stage disease, and improving life expectancy and palliation for advanced stages, are goals driving major areas of research. The armamentarium of targeted treatments for breast cancer is ever expanding as understanding of breast cancer biology deepens. A revolution in our treatment was heralded a decade ago by the introduction of trastuzumab for human epidermal receptor-2 positive (HER2+) disease resulting in remarkable reductions in recurrence and improvements in overall survival (OS). Advances continue to be made in other breast cancer subtypes targeting key activating pathways for therapeutic development. However, for these other targeted agents, improvement in OS has been elusive. This article focuses on the development of targeted therapy in breast cancer focusing primarily on the last 5 years, to illustrate that as we understand the complex pathways allowing the dysregulated cell to become malignant, it also propels us closer towards the promise of precision and personalized medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Targeted Therapy in Medicine)
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Review
Exosomes: Potential in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy
by Phillip Munson and Arti Shukla
Medicines 2015, 2(4), 310-327; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines2040310 - 2 Nov 2015
Cited by 62 | Viewed by 9300
Abstract
Exosomes are membrane-bound, intercellular communication shuttles that are defined by their endocytic origin and size range of 30–140 nm. Secreted by nearly all mammalian cell types and present in myriad bodily fluids, exosomes confer messages between cells, proximal and distal, by transporting biofunctional [...] Read more.
Exosomes are membrane-bound, intercellular communication shuttles that are defined by their endocytic origin and size range of 30–140 nm. Secreted by nearly all mammalian cell types and present in myriad bodily fluids, exosomes confer messages between cells, proximal and distal, by transporting biofunctional cargo in the form of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. They play a vital role in cellular signaling in both normal physiology and disease states, particularly cancer. Exosomes are powerful progenitors in altering target cell phenotypes, particularly in tumorigenesis and cancer progression, with the ability to alter tumor microenvironments and to assist in establishing the pre-metastatic niche. Many aspects of exosomes present them as novel means to identify cancer biomarkers for early detection and therapeutic targets, and using intrinsic and engineered characteristics of exosomes as therapeutic devices to ameliorate the progression of the disease. This review outlines some of the recent and major findings with regard to exosomes in cancer, and their utilization as therapeutic tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Targeted Therapy in Medicine)
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