The 10th Anniversary of Medicines: Future Directions

A special issue of Medicines (ISSN 2305-6320).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 2912

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Meikai University Research Institute of Odontology (M-RIO), 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283, Japan
Interests: informatics; information network; pharmacy; biological pharmacy; basic medicine; general pharmacology; boundary medicine; laboratory medicine; dentistry
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Medicines (ISSN 2305-6320) is an international, peer-reviewed, and open access journal aiming to create a platform covering all areas of medical disciplines and subspecialties. It publishes original research papers, case reports, and systematic reviews on all aspects of basic, clinical, and translational research in relation to human health. The journal will accept manuscripts on medical concepts that include evidence-based medicine (e.g., Western medicine) and/or alternative medicine (e.g., Oriental medicine such as Traditional Chinese medicine and Kampo medicine). The inaugural Special Issue of Medicines (63 pages) was released in December 2014, by the founding Editor-in-Chief Prof. Dr. Gerhard Litscher from Medical University of Graz (Austria). With the rapid advancement of science and technology, the editorial board has grown, with a second Editor-in-Chief (Prof. Dr. Hiroshi Sakagami from Meikai Research Institute of Odontology), two Section Editor-in-Chiefs, two Associate Editors, one Section Associate Editor, 45 Editorial Board Members and 4 Section Board Members joining since March 2020. Among the 613 articles published so far, 190 articles have been cited 10 times or more, giving it an H5-Index of 35 (Alternative and Traditional Medicine). In order to improve the quality of papers, Medicines has invited highly potential young researchers to be section board members. Due to the rigorous revision processes, the quality of submitted papers has considerably improved. This led to the significant increase in the number of views of full-text and abstract over the past five years (2017~2021): 3.6-fold (120,711 to 431.659) and 5.8-fold (85,321 to 492,742), respectively.

In December 2023, Medicines will celebrate its 10th anniversary, and so we are planning to publish the Special Issue "The 10th Anniversary of Medicines: Future Directions". We hope that the Editorial Board Member of each of the sections of Medicines will consider submitting their articles on systematic reviews, current and future research, including the development of new products and services that ultimately improve quality of life. This invitation is extended to all active researchers, clinical doctors and practitioners with research interest in the field of medicines.

Prof. Dr. Hiroshi Sakagami
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • allergic diseases
  • cancer biology and anticancer therapeutics
  • cardiology and vascular diseases
  • emergency medicine and critical care
  • endocrinology and metabolic disorders
  • epidemiologic diseases
  • gastroenterological and hepatopancretobiliar disorders
  • immunologic diseases
  • infectious diseases
  • nephrology and urology
  • neurology and neurologic diseases
  • new drugs exploration and development
  • oral medicine and dentistry
  • pneumological diseases
  • psychiatric diseases
  • rare diseases
  • stem cell investigation and regenerative medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 1221 KiB  
Article
ADME Gene-Related Pharmacogenomic Labeling of FDA-Approved Drugs: Comparison with Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Evidence Levels
by Subrata Deb, Robert Hopefl, Anthony Allen Reeves and Dena Cvetkovic
Medicines 2024, 11(3), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines11030006 - 20 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Pharmacogenomics (PGx) can facilitate the transition to patient-specific drug regimens and thus improve their efficacy and reduce toxicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overlap of PGx classification for drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME)-related genes in the U.S. [...] Read more.
Pharmacogenomics (PGx) can facilitate the transition to patient-specific drug regimens and thus improve their efficacy and reduce toxicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overlap of PGx classification for drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME)-related genes in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) PGx labeling and in the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) database. FDA-approved drugs and PGx labeling for ADME genes were identified in the CPIC database. Drugs were filtered by their association with ADME (pharmacokinetics)-related genes, PGx FDA labeling class, and CPIC evidence level. FDA PGx labeling was classified as either actionable, informative, testing recommended, or testing required, and varying CPIC evidence levels as either A, B, C, or D. From a total of 442 ADME and non-ADME gene–drug pairs in the CPIC database, 273, 55, and 48 pairs were excluded for lack of FDA labeling, mixed CPIC evidence level provisional classification, and non-ADME gene–drug pairs, respectively. The 66 ADME gene–drug pairs were classified into the following categories: 10 (15%) informative, 49 (74%) actionable, 6 (9%) testing recommended, and 1 (2%) testing required. CYP2D6 was the most prevalent gene among the FDA PGx labeling. From the ADME gene–drug pairs with both FDA and CPIC PGx classification, the majority of the drugs were for depression, cancer, and pain medications. The ADME gene–drug pairs with FDA PGx labeling considerably overlap with CPIC classification; however, a large number of ADME gene–drug pairs have only CPIC evidence levels but not FDA classification. PGx actionable labeling was the most common classification, with CYP2D6 as the most prevalent ADME gene in the FDA PGx labeling. Health professionals can impact therapeutic outcomes via pharmacogenetic interventions by analyzing and reconciling the FDA labels and CPIC database. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of Medicines: Future Directions)
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Review

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17 pages, 367 KiB  
Review
Human Leucocyte Antigen Genetics in Idiosyncratic Drug-Induced Liver Injury with Evidence Based on the Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method
by Rolf Teschke and Gaby Danan
Medicines 2024, 11(4), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines11040009 - 11 Apr 2024
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Abstract
The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) allele variability was studied in cohorts of patients with idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (iDILI). Some reports showed an association between HLA genetics and iDILI, proposing HLA alleles as a potential risk factor for the liver injury. However, the [...] Read more.
The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) allele variability was studied in cohorts of patients with idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (iDILI). Some reports showed an association between HLA genetics and iDILI, proposing HLA alleles as a potential risk factor for the liver injury. However, the strength of such assumptions heavily depends on the quality of the iDILI diagnosis, calling for a thorough analysis. Using the PubMed database and Google Science, a total of 25 reports of case series or single cases were retrieved using the terms HLA genes and iDILI. It turned out that in 10/25 reports (40%), HLA genetics were determined in iDILI cases, for which no causality assessment method (CAM) was used or a non-validated tool was applied, meaning the findings were based on subjective opinion, providing disputable results and hence not scoring individual key elements. By contrast, in most iDILI reports (60%), the Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method (RUCAM) was applied, which is the diagnostic algorithm preferred worldwide to assess causality in iDILI cases and represents a quantitative, objective tool that has been well validated by both internal and external DILI experts. The RUCAM provided evidence-based results concerning liver injury by 1 drug class (antituberculotics + antiretrovirals) and 19 different drugs, comprising 900 iDILI cases. Among the top-ranking drugs were amoxicillin–clavulanate (290 cases, HLA A*02:01 or HLA A*30:02), followed by flucloxacillin (255 cases, HLA B*57:01), trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (86 cases, HLA B*14:01 or HLA B*14:02), methimazole (40 cases, HLA C*03:02), carbamazepine (29 cases, HLA A*31:01), and nitrofurantoin (26 cases, HLA A*33:01). In conclusion, the HLA genetics in 900 idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury cases with evidence based on the RUCAM are available for studying the mechanistic steps leading to the injury, including metabolic factors through cytochrome P450 isoforms and processes that activate the innate immune system to the adaptive immune system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of Medicines: Future Directions)
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