Special Issue "Designing Tasks within Dynamic and Interactive Mathematics Learning Environments"

A special issue of Mathematics (ISSN 2227-7390).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anna Baccaglini-Frank
Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
Interests: Technology-enhanced learning; Design-based research for the development of mathematical activities for all grade levels; Educational interventions for students manifesting persistent difficulties in mathematical learning

Special Issue Information

Dynamic and interactive mathematics learning environments (DIMLEs) have become the protagonists of an increasing body of research and are currently being used by many mathematics educators in a variety of contexts. Indeed, as digital technology evolves, a variety of new educational spaces and forms for the mathematics classroom open up, and novel ideas and approaches emerge. This Special Issue specifically addresses new design issues, principles, and choices grounded within the Mathematics Education research tradition that have been adopted and studied recently, possibly also in response to the online distance learning emergency created by the COVID-19 pandemic. Papers submitted to this Special Issue should focus in particular on: how mathematical tasks can be designed so that specific features of the DIMLE used (including multi-touch inputs or haptic interfaces) can be capitalized upon to transform learners’ experiential knowledge into conceptual mathematical knowledge, and how the design of tasks in DIMLEs shapes relationships within mathematical classrooms (including virtual classrooms). The Special Issue also welcomes literature reviews providing insights into the issues above.

Dr. Anna Baccaglini-Frank
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Mathematics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Digital technology
  • Distance learning
  • Dynamic and interactive mathematics learning environments
  • Mathematics education
  • Task design

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Mathematical Representation Competency in Relation to Use of Digital Technology and Task Design—A Literature Review
Mathematics 2021, 9(4), 444; https://doi.org/10.3390/math9040444 - 23 Feb 2021
Viewed by 139
Abstract
Representations are crucial to mathematical activity, both for learners and skilled mathematicians. Digital technologies (DT) to support mathematical activity offer a plethora of new possibilities, not least in the context of mathematics education. This paper presents a literature review on representations and activation [...] Read more.
Representations are crucial to mathematical activity, both for learners and skilled mathematicians. Digital technologies (DT) to support mathematical activity offer a plethora of new possibilities, not least in the context of mathematics education. This paper presents a literature review on representations and activation of students’ representation competency when using DT in mathematics teaching and learning situations. It does so with a starting point in task designs involving digital tools aiming to activate representation competency, drawing on the notion of Mathematical Digital Boundary Object (MDBO). The 30 studies included in the literature review are analyzed using Duval’s registers of semiotic representations and the representation competency from the Danish KOM framework. The results reveal a clear connection between the mathematical topics addressed and the types of representation utilized, and further indicate that certain aspects of the representation competency are outsourced when DT are used. To activate the representation competency in relation to the use of DT, we offer five suggestions for consideration when designing mathematical tasks. Finally, we raise the question of whether DT create new representations or merely new activities. Full article
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Open AccessReview
A Systematic Review on Task Design in Dynamic and Interactive Mathematics Learning Environments (DIMLEs)
Mathematics 2021, 9(4), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/math9040399 - 18 Feb 2021
Viewed by 259
Abstract
Task design constitutes a growing core of research in mathematics education. In particular, task design in Dynamic and Interactive Mathematics Learning Environments (DIMLEs) has become very popular, although it remains under-researched. This study aims to systematically analyze the current state of research on [...] Read more.
Task design constitutes a growing core of research in mathematics education. In particular, task design in Dynamic and Interactive Mathematics Learning Environments (DIMLEs) has become very popular, although it remains under-researched. This study aims to systematically analyze the current state of research on task design in DIMLEs. The literature was searched through the Web of Science, and 10 articles were included in the review. Results show that the majority of research studies were undertaken in Asia, with a focus on secondary and higher education. Studies used design-based research, case study, and grounded theory. Most studies were carried out in the domain of geometry, followed by algebra and calculus. Most researchers used GeoGebra as a DIMLE. The studies used different frameworks and contributed to the literature by developing and testing design principles, problematizing task design, and extending existing frameworks. There are also some reported challenges concerning task design in DIMLEs, such as students’ negative attitudes and beliefs and being inexperienced or unfamiliar with DIMLEs. E-assessment issues also created problems, as well as students’ poor mathematical background and time-consuming activities for teachers and students. Overall, the results indicate that further studies are needed on task design in DIMLEs. Full article
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