Viral Hepatitis: Prevention, Infection, and Treatment

A special issue of Livers (ISSN 2673-4389).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 3 June 2024 | Viewed by 2463

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, Surgery and Odontology Suola Meduca Salernitans, Università degli Studi di Salerno, 84084 Baronissi, Italy
Interests: viral hepatitis; NAFLD; cirrhosis; hepatocellular carcinoma; internal medicine

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Internal Medicine and Hepatology Unit, University Hospital “San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d’Aragona”, University of Salerno, 84131 Salerno, Italy
Interests: viral hepatitis; NAFLD; cirrhosis; hepatocellular carcinoma; liver immunology; internal medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The scenario of viral hepatitis, mainly referring to hepatitis B and C, has changed rapidly in recent years due to prevention interventions and increasingly effective antiviral therapies. Considering these advances, the WHO set the goal of eliminating viral hepatitis as a major public health threat by 2030. This goal, however, still represents an open challenge because of important issues. These include the high number of undiagnosed people, inadequate prophylaxis and poor access to therapy for disadvantaged populations, and the complexity of assessing progress towards established goals.

In addition, the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has hampered the management of people with viral hepatitis. In fact, it was documented that it led to a reduction in testing and initiation of treatments. Several efforts to counter this situation and stay in line with WHO goals have been conducted around the world, such as hepatitis C screening programs leveraging COVID-19 related services.

This Special Issue aims to collect articles on various aspects of viral hepatitis, including epidemiology, prevention, infection, screening strategies, and recent advances in antiviral therapies. In addition, articles analyzing the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on patients with viral hepatitis and proposing how to maintain an adequate rate of identification and treatment despite the reorganization of health services will be considered.

Prof. Dr. Marcello Persico
Dr. Pietro Torre
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Livers is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hepatitis A
  • hepatitis B
  • hepatitis C
  • hepatitis D
  • hepatitis E
  • hepatitis C screening
  • viral hepatitis elimination

Published Papers (2 papers)

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13 pages, 1211 KiB  
Article
Impact of IL-12B Genetic Variants on Antiviral Treatment Response among Hepatitis B Patients in Pakistan
by Yasmin Badshah, Maria Shabbir, Sameen Zafar, Uzma Mussarat, Aamer Ikram, Sumbal Javed and Hashaam Akhtar
Livers 2023, 3(3), 494-506; https://doi.org/10.3390/livers3030034 - 12 Sep 2023
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Abstract
HBV is a continuous major global health concern. Genetic factors of hosts are known to play a role in HBV infection outcomes. This study aimed to reveal the association of IL-12b 3′ UTR variant rs3212227 in HBV patients. Genotyping was performed using ARMS-PCR [...] Read more.
HBV is a continuous major global health concern. Genetic factors of hosts are known to play a role in HBV infection outcomes. This study aimed to reveal the association of IL-12b 3′ UTR variant rs3212227 in HBV patients. Genotyping was performed using ARMS-PCR to detect IL-12b rs3212227 polymorphism. The patients were categorized into groups based on their response to the antiviral therapy. Group I: non-sustained virological response (NSR); Group II: sustained virological responders (SVR); and Group III: HBV-positive fresh cases. ALT levels were measured to evaluate liver function, and viral load was determined to evaluate viral infectivity among the study groups. The variant genotype CC was found to be significantly associated with the non-sustained virological response to the antiviral therapy (with a p-value of 0.0117; OR = 2.914; RR = 1.556). It was also determined that the genotype CC was the most prevalent genotype among both genders in the NSR group. Viral load was found to be 6-fold higher in Group III compared to Group I and Group II. The results suggest that genotype CC is the most prevalent genotype in the NSR groups, and it is associated with a poor response to antiviral therapy in Pakistani patients with HBV infection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viral Hepatitis: Prevention, Infection, and Treatment)
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Review

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10 pages, 238 KiB  
Review
The Epidemiology of Chronic Hepatitis C: Where We Are Now
by Cristina Stasi, Caterina Milli, Fabio Voller and Caterina Silvestri
Livers 2024, 4(2), 172-181; https://doi.org/10.3390/livers4020013 - 30 Mar 2024
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Abstract
One of the main objectives of the World Health Organization is the eradication of viral hepatitis by 2030 by identifying subjects before disease progression. In 2019, only 21% of the 58 million people chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) had been diagnosed, [...] Read more.
One of the main objectives of the World Health Organization is the eradication of viral hepatitis by 2030 by identifying subjects before disease progression. In 2019, only 21% of the 58 million people chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) had been diagnosed, while overall 13% had been treated. The key recommendation of international screening programs is to reach the people at major risk of viral hepatitis and the general population. National plans, including that in Italy, have dedicated budget lines to support efforts to achieve the objective of elimination. The Italian program involves free screening for HCV in the general population born between 1969 and 1989 and also for all persons in the care of addiction services (Ser.D) and prisoners. The screening programs differed slightly among regions in Italy. In particular, referring to the screening for people born in the period of 1969–1989, in Tuscany, these people received an invitation by SMS to undergo a HCV antibody test. If the test results were positive, the subject was registered on a regional platform and required to undergo HCV RNA testing, prescribed by their GP. In the case of testing positive for HCV RNA, the linkage to care (i.e., patient entry into specialist care after diagnosis) is guaranteed. A strong effort is currently required to eliminate HCV effectively. This review highlights the most recent changes to the epidemiological scenario at the global, European, Italian, and regional (Tuscany) levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viral Hepatitis: Prevention, Infection, and Treatment)
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