Special Issue "Smart Home"

A special issue of Information (ISSN 2078-2489).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 March 2016).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Sugam Sharma Website E-Mail
Center for Survey Statistics and Methodology (CSSM), Iowa State University, USA
Interests: data-driven science; Big Data; spatial data; GIS; smart home technology; health informatics; wireless sensor networks
Guest Editor
Dr. Anna Fensel Website E-Mail
Department of Computer Science, Semantic Technology Institute (STI) Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
Interests: Semantic Technology; Knowledge Graphs; Explainable AI; Data Value Chain; Social Web

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue (SI) focuses on advancements in inclusive, as well as energy efficiency of smart home technology. This encompasses smart home, smart cities, ICT solutions for efficient energy consumption, and e-health, which will be equipped with technologies to empower the inhabitants with special needs and enable them for the societal inclusion. This SI is especially interested in receiving high quality, unpublished submissions that focus on advancing the technologies in cyber-physical infrastructure to ameliorate the quality of life, especially of dependent senior adults and residents with chronic diseases, and/or addressing an energy saving aspect: in particular, energy savings should take place without a decrease in residents’ quality of lives. Topics will include but are not limited to:

  • Intelligent Cyber-Physical, ICT Infrastructures: Smart Home, Smart Village, Smart City
  • Smart Homes and E-Health/Energy Efficiency
  • Smart Metering
  • Health Informatics
  • Healthcare services
  • RFID and Body Sensors
  • Wearable Sensors
  • Intelligent Sensors
  • Next Generation Healthcare Infrastructure
  • Cost Effective Home Health Monitoring
  • Smart Shirt
  • Embedded Computing Systems
  • Cloud Computing in Smart Home Technology
  • Health Data Collection and Processing
  • Health Data Repository and Management in Cloud
  • Smart Building and City Data Management
  • Semantic Rules, Policies and Context-Awareness in Smart Buildings
  • Participatory Telehealth in Smart City
  • Gaming for E-Health or Energy Saving
  • E-Health or Energy Efficiency Education
  • Ambient Intelligence, Human-Computer/ Human-Machine/ Human-Device Interface
  • Physical and Conceptual Modeling of Cyber-Physical Environments
  • Human Factors, Ethics and Usability for Seniors with Cognitive Impairments
  • Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing Concerns
  • Smart Management of Home Appliances
  • Management of Home Energy Concerns
  • Persuasive and Supportive E-Health
  • E-Health and Chronic Diseases Management
  • Smart Emergency Care for Seniors
  • Smart Wheelchairs and Personal Robotics
  • Context Awareness and Autonomous Computing
  • Residential Networks and Services
  • Mobile Services
  • Social, Policy, Privacy, Security Concerns
  • Middleware Design and Support for Smart Home
  • Health Technology Assessment and Analysis
  • Guidelines and Policy for Future Health Management Infrastructure
  • Innovative Smart Home Applications and Services
  • Smart Environment Monitoring and Control

Dr. Sugam Sharma
Ass.-Prof. Dr. Anna Fensel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • smart
  • home
  • health
  • energy
  • technology
  • semantics
  • computing

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Smart Homes and Sensors for Surveillance and Preventive Education at Home: Example of Obesity
Information 2016, 7(3), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/info7030050 - 08 Aug 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
(1) Background: The aim of this paper is to show that e-health tools like smart homes allow the personalization of the surveillance and preventive education of chronic patients, such as obese persons, in order to maintain a comfortable and preventive lifestyle at home. [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The aim of this paper is to show that e-health tools like smart homes allow the personalization of the surveillance and preventive education of chronic patients, such as obese persons, in order to maintain a comfortable and preventive lifestyle at home. (2) Technologies and methods: Several types of sensors allow coaching the patient at home, e.g., the sensors recording the activity and monitoring the physiology of the person. All of this information serves to personalize serious games dedicated to preventive education, for example in nutrition and vision. (3) Results: We built a system of personalized preventive education at home based on serious games, derived from the feedback information they provide through a monitoring system. Therefore, it is possible to define (after clustering and personalized calibration) from the at home surveillance of chronic patients different comfort zones where their behavior can be estimated as normal or abnormal and, then, to adapt both alarm levels for surveillance and education programs for prevention, the chosen example of application being obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Home)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation of Voltage Control at Consumers Connection Points Based on Smart Approach
Information 2016, 7(3), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/info7030042 - 12 Jul 2016
Cited by 4
Abstract
More and more functions are performed automatically with the use of various electrical appliances and sophisticated control systems in all spheres of human life. In this regard, the demand for reliable and quality power supply is increasing. To date, low power quality, in [...] Read more.
More and more functions are performed automatically with the use of various electrical appliances and sophisticated control systems in all spheres of human life. In this regard, the demand for reliable and quality power supply is increasing. To date, low power quality, in particular unacceptable voltage levels, is an important deterrent for introducing technologies of smart electricity consumers (smart homes, smart companies, smart cities). This paper presents a comprehensive solution of this problem with the use of a voltage control system in the distribution grids, which is oriented on grids with a large number of heterogeneous loads and low level of Information Technology (IT) penetration. It is proposed to be installed on distribution substation special devices that perform continuous measurements of voltage levels, produce short-term forecasts and transmit the permissible ranges of voltage control to the power supply centers. The computing unit at the primary substation analyzes the data received from all distribution substations, and determines the optimum control actions to meet the requirements of all consumers. The proposed system was compared with conventional voltage control methods. The results have proved the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Home)
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Open AccessArticle
User in the Loop: Adaptive Smart Homes Exploiting User Feedback—State of the Art and Future Directions
Information 2016, 7(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/info7020035 - 15 Jun 2016
Cited by 6
Abstract
Due to the decrease of sensor and actuator prices and their ease of installation, smart homes and smart environments are more and more exploited in automation and health applications. In these applications, activity recognition has an important place. This article presents a general [...] Read more.
Due to the decrease of sensor and actuator prices and their ease of installation, smart homes and smart environments are more and more exploited in automation and health applications. In these applications, activity recognition has an important place. This article presents a general architecture that is responsible for adapting automation for the different users of the smart home while recognizing their activities. For that, semi-supervised learning algorithms and Markov-based models are used to determine the preferences of the user considering a combination of: (1) observations of the data that have been acquired since the start of the experiment and (2) feedback of the users on decisions that have been taken by the automation. We present preliminarily simulated experimental results regarding the determination of preferences for a user. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Home)
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Open AccessArticle
The Potential of Three Computer-Based Communication Activities for Supporting Older Adult Independent Living
Information 2016, 7(2), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/info7020026 - 24 May 2016
Cited by 2
Abstract
Technology has become an increasingly integral part of life. For example, technology allows individuals to stay in touch with loved ones, obtain medical services through telehealthcare, and enjoy an overall higher quality of life. Particularly for older adults, using technology increases the likelihood [...] Read more.
Technology has become an increasingly integral part of life. For example, technology allows individuals to stay in touch with loved ones, obtain medical services through telehealthcare, and enjoy an overall higher quality of life. Particularly for older adults, using technology increases the likelihood that they will maintain their independence and autonomy. Long-distance caregiving has recently become a feasible option where caregivers for older adults can access reports and information about their loved one’s patterns that day (e.g., food and medication intake). Technology may be able to offset age-related challenges (e.g., caregiving, accessing healthcare, decreased social networks) by applying technology to the needs of older adults. Solutions for meeting such challenges, however, have been less targeted. In addition, the healthcare system is evolving to focus on providing options and services in the home. This has direct implications for older adults, as the majority of healthcare services are utilized by older adults. Research is still at the beginning stages of developing successful technology tools that are compatible with older adult users. Therefore, the design, implementation, and outcome of such computer-based communication activities will be discussed in this paper in order to guide future endeavors in technology marketed for older adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Home)
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