Special Issue "(New) Histories of Science, in and beyond Modern Europe"

A special issue of Histories (ISSN 2409-9252).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2022 | Viewed by 2085

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Volker Remmert
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Center for Science and Technology Studies, Wuppertal University, Wuppertal, Germany
Interests: history of early modern science; history of mathematics; history of science during the Nazi period and in postwar Germany
Jun.-Prof. Dr. Dania Achermann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Center for Science and Technology Studies, Wuppertal University, Wuppertal, Germany
Interests: history of science and technology 19th and 20th century; history of cold war science; history of geosciences
Jun.-Prof. Dr. Cécile Stephanie Stehrenberger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Center for Science and Technology Studies, Wuppertal University, Wuppertal, Germany
Interests: history of disaster science; history of the social sciences and humanities; cold war; colonialialism; gender studies; discard studies
PD Dr. Fabian Link
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Center for Science and Technology Studies, Wuppertal University, Wuppertal, Germany
Interests: history of the humanities and the social sciences in the 19th and 20th centuries; national socialism; cold war; methods and theories in historiography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past few decades, a wide array of research has been categorized as “history of science”, rendering it an extremely dynamic and diversified field. Scholars have explored a wide range of topics beyond the classical fields of the histories of the natural sciences and mathematics, including the human and social sciences as well as the humanities. They have developed and applied various methods and theoretical approaches that have emerged from a great variety of institutional settings and disciplinary contexts across the globe. In what follows, we refer to this gamut of historical approaches as histories of science. Histories of science have become a global interest and are also largely characterized by inter- and multidisciplinary practices.

The goal of this Special Issue is not to provide an all-encompassing overview of the research areas of histories of science; it rather aims to present them by assembling contributions on a broad spectrum of current research topics and (new) approaches that highlight their ramifications and illustrate their ties to neighboring disciplines and (interdisciplinary) areas of research, both historical studies and approaches from other disciplines and research areas—e.g., philosophy of science, science and technology studies, history of knowledge, economic history, gender studies, or intellectual history. Moreover, the contributions shall exemplify how histories of science can be written in ways that not only move across but also challenge temporal and spatial categories and categorizations, including hegemonic understandings of “modernity”, Eurocentric views of the development of science and the humanities, or certain notions of center-periphery. They shall deal with histories of specific disciplines, specific research objects and phenomena, and with various disciplinary/academic/scientific practices, thereby also exploring the historicity of certain ideals of scientificity (in the sense of the German “Wissenschaftlichkeit”) and the demarcation of science from other forms of knowledge. Moreover, some papers will be dedicated to selected methods and perspectives of current approaches in the histories of science.

The audience that the Special Issue will address consists of general historians who are not necessarily already familiar with the field. The Special Issue seeks to provide an accessible, reliable but also substantive introduction to this field. In order to achieve these goals, the Special Issue features 25 short essays (max. 24,000 characters each) that, comparable to handbook entries, discuss in a concise and compelling as well as readable fashion the historical development and state of the art with respect to:

  1. The history of a specific discipline or interdisciplinary field, its institutionalization, characterization and transformation, such as:
    • ecology;
    • economics;
    • historiography of science;
    • humanities;  
    • life and human sciences;
    • mathematics;
    • social sciences;
  2. The history of the scientific study of certain phenomena, how they became research/epistemic objects, how they were studied and how the produced knowledge has been used, such as:
    • anthropocene;
    • disaster science;
    • natural phenomena (weather, fossils, water, volcanoes…)
    • natural ressources;
    • pandemics;
    • religion;
    • toxicity;
    • violence and war;
    • the scientific study of waste;
  3. The role of specific actors/actants, practices, media, forms of representation, and places/spaces of knowledge production in the history of different fields, such as:
    • circulation of scientific knowledge;
    • discourses;
    • domestic spaces;
    • nonhumans;
    • printing/history of the book;  
    • research technologies/scientific instruments;
    • scientific illustration/visualization; scientific languages;
  4. Specific perspectives and methods that are employed in the history of science, such as:
    • digital history of science;
    • gender studies and feminist history of science;
    • global history of science;
    • history of art and science;
    • post/decolonial history of science;
    • STS;
  5. Outlooks on:
    • the history of (scientific and nonscientific) knowledge;
    • the history of medicine;
    • the history of technology;

Please submit abstracts of possible contributions (3.000 characters) to one of the editors by April 30, 2021.

Prof. Dr. Volker Remmert
Jun.-Prof. Dr. Dania Achermann
Jun.-Prof. Dr. Cécile Stephanie Stehrenberger
PD Dr. Fabian Link
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Histories is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication within this special issue is waived. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • History of Science
  • History of Scientific Disciplines
  • History of Scientific Practices
  • History of Scientific Objects
  • Perspectives in the History of Science

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Towards a Negative History of Science: The Unknown, Errors, Ignorance, and the “Pseudosciences”
Histories 2022, 2(2), 146-156; https://doi.org/10.3390/histories2020011 - 20 May 2022
Abstract
This article outlines elements of a negative history of science. For historians wishing to get a fuller picture of scientific practice both internally and externally, there is a lot to be gained by considering the dialectical constitution of scientific knowledge. To fully comprehend [...] Read more.
This article outlines elements of a negative history of science. For historians wishing to get a fuller picture of scientific practice both internally and externally, there is a lot to be gained by considering the dialectical constitution of scientific knowledge. To fully comprehend this relationality, historians should, therefore, trace the negative relations science maintains. Through oppositions, such as known/unknown; success/error; consideration/ignorance; and inclusion/exclusion, scientific knowledge emerges and disappears, and the social position of scientific practice is both established and contested. To exemplify our argument, we present four areas: the unknown, errors, ignorance, and the “pseudosciences”. Taken together, this approach allows us to understand how science constitutes itself epistemically and socially across different locations and historical periods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue (New) Histories of Science, in and beyond Modern Europe)
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