Special Issue "Current Health Challenges for Child and Adolescent"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "School Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 14 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Cristina Lidón-Moyano
Website
Guest Editor
International University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: My research focuses on drugs such as opioids or tobacco ( and its exposure i.e. secand- ahdn thrid-hand smoke), screen exposure, and addiction. And I have little experience working on mental health, self-harm, and its association with other physical diseases.
Dr. Adrián González-Marrón
Website
Guest Editor
International University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: My main area of expertise is the epidemiology of tobacco use and lung cancer prevention activities, with a focus on women. Also interested in many other areas of public health, such as emerging zoonoses and food-related illnesses and nutrition disorders.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is to update researchers on health challenges currently facing children and adolescents. The main health issues of interest include relatively new concepts such as the challenges and burden of the coronavirus pandemic, exposure to third-hand smoke, use of electronic cigarettes, consumption of new drugs, screen exposure (including social-media use), or diets high in ultra-processed foods. Moreover, areas where health outcomes are falling short will also be considered, which according to the World Health Organization include injuries, mental health, violence, HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases, early pregnancy and childbirth, alcohol and drugs, obesity, nutrition and micronutrient deficiencies, undernutrition and obesity, physical activity (inactivity), tobacco use, and rights of adolescents.

Dr. Cristina Lidón-Moyano
Dr. Adrián González-Marrón
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Child and adolescent health
  • Coronavirus
  • Tobacco use and exposure
  • Alcohol and drugs
  • Screen exposure
  • Nutrition
  • Injuries
  • Mental Health
  • Violence
  • Sexual and reproductive health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Association between Leisure Screen Time and Junk Food Intake in a Nationwide Representative Sample of Spanish Children (1–14 Years): A Cross-Sectional Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 228; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020228 - 18 Feb 2021
Viewed by 323
Abstract
Evidence on the association between new patterns of leisure screen time and junk food consumption in Spanish children at the national level is scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the relation between daily leisure screen time and the frequency of [...] Read more.
Evidence on the association between new patterns of leisure screen time and junk food consumption in Spanish children at the national level is scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the relation between daily leisure screen time and the frequency of sweet, soft drink, fast food, and snack intake in a representative sample of Spanish children and adolescents aged from 1 to 14 years. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a representative sample of the Spanish population under 15 years recruited for the 2017 Spanish National Health Survey (n = 5480). We dichotomized sweet, soft drink, fast food, and snack intake (high/low) and categorized daily leisure screen time (0–59, 60–119, 120–179, and ≥180 min). We calculated crude prevalence ratios and adjusted prevalence ratios, and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), of high frequency of sweet, soft drink, fast food, and snack intake. Children spending at least one hour of daily leisure screen time had higher prevalence of high frequency of sweet and snack intake than children being exposed less than one hour. For soft drinks and fast food, prevalence of high frequency intake was significantly higher from two and three hours of exposure, respectively. Longer periods of screen exposure in Spanish children during their leisure time may be associated with poorer dietary behaviors. The negative effects of excessive screen time in pediatrics population should be further studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Health Challenges for Child and Adolescent)
Open AccessArticle
Smartphone and Tablet Usage during COVID-19 Pandemic Confinement in Children under 48 Months in Barcelona (Spain)
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010096 - 19 Jan 2021
Viewed by 467
Abstract
Background: Total lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic might have potentially increased screen time in children. This study aims to describe the smartphone and tablets usage in children under 48 months living in Barcelona during the COVID-19 confinement. Methods: Cross-sectional study using a non-probabilistic [...] Read more.
Background: Total lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic might have potentially increased screen time in children. This study aims to describe the smartphone and tablets usage in children under 48 months living in Barcelona during the COVID-19 confinement. Methods: Cross-sectional study using a non-probabilistic sample of parents with children under 48 months living in Barcelona (Spain) during COVID-19 confinement (n = 313). We calculated percentages of exposure to smartphones and tablets. Moreover, for those children were exposed, we calculated unadjusted and adjusted Geometric Mean Ratios (GMR) of daily smartphones and tablets usage and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) trough Generalized Linear Models with Gamma family and link log. Associations were adjusted for potential confounders. Results: During COVID-19 confinement, 67.5% of children under 48 months were daily exposed to smartphones and tablets. Further, those children who were exposed during meals, as well as before going to bed, spend longer durations using them, aGMR = 2.38 (95% CI 1.73, 3.34) and aGMR = 1.95 (95% CI 1.34, 2.91) respectively. Conclusion: Two out of three children under 48 months living in Barcelona were daily exposed to smartphones and tablets during total lockdown due to COVID-19. Taking this findings into account cohort studies are needed to assess any change in the screen time patterns due to total confinement in order to allow the Government help families, particularly those more vulnerable, in a possible pandemic resurgence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Health Challenges for Child and Adolescent)
Open AccessArticle
Adolescent Lifestyle Behaviors, Coping Strategies and Subjective Wellbeing during the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Online Student Survey
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 472; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040472 - 09 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2046
Abstract
Background and objectives: Adolescence represents a critical period for rapid psychophysical and socio-cognitive changes, with implications for health and wellbeing in later life. From this perspective, the manifestation of unhealthy lifestyles and dysfunctional behaviors may reflect a change in wellbeing requiring alertness and [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Adolescence represents a critical period for rapid psychophysical and socio-cognitive changes, with implications for health and wellbeing in later life. From this perspective, the manifestation of unhealthy lifestyles and dysfunctional behaviors may reflect a change in wellbeing requiring alertness and prompt intervention. This study investigated lifestyle behaviors and coping strategies among Italian adolescents, also in relation to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and whether they would predict a change in subjective wellbeing. Materials and Methods: In the period between 1 April and 10 April 2020, adolescents aged 15–21 filled out an online survey consisting of 33 questions investigating socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, coping strategies, and subjective wellbeing. Results: Data was available on 306 participants. Most adolescents planned their daily routine (57.8%), engaging in structured activities (17.6–67.3%) and developing new interests (54.6%), and gave a positive reading of the ongoing period (57.8%), thus revealing adaptive coping strategies. Family wise, even though it was hard to stay at home (66%) and difficulties emerged, including self-isolation (50.7%) and quarrels (31.7%), a relevant proportion of adolescents shared their feelings (40.5%) and revaluated their family relationships (29.4–39.7%). In terms of social and school engagement, almost all adolescents kept contacts with their partner, friends, and teachers (90.2–93.5%). School commitments at home were sufficiently preserved (63.1%), however adolescents expressed preoccupations about their educational path (56.2%). A change in subjective wellbeing (49.3%) and symptoms of anxiety (39.9%) were frequently reported. A number of factors predicted a change in subjective wellbeing, including adaptive coping strategies (physical activity, OR = 2.609, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.297–5.247; engaging in different activities than before, OR = 2.212, 95% CI 1.157–4.230), family issues (finding hard to stay at home, OR = 3.852, 95% CI 1.953–7.599; having quarrels, OR = 2.158, 95% CI 1.122–4.150), school-related behaviors (fearing a negative educational outcome, OR = 1.971, 95% 1.063–3.655), and female gender (OR = 3.647, 95% CI 1.694–7.851). Conclusions: Both personal and environmental coping resources are relevant to subjective wellbeing in adolescence and should be taken into account for prevention and early intervention in youth mental health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Health Challenges for Child and Adolescent)
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