Pregnancy, Childbirth, Puerperium, Breastfeeding and Sexuality in the World of Rare Diseases

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 3195

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Research Group CTS1068, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: rare diseases and pregnant women
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, 18016 Granada, Spain
Interests: rare diseases and pregnant women
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Group CTS1068, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: rare diseases and pregnant women
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Between 6 and 8% of the world's population will suffer from a rare disease in their lifetime. It is estimated that there are between 6000 and 7000 rare diseases, affecting more than 300 million people worldwide.

More than 80% of rare diseases have a genetic component, generate some kind of disability in the affected person and have a high economic cost. The adoption of next-generation sequencing has improved the diagnosis rates of rare diseases over the last decade. However, most people suffering from a rare disease do not have an accurate diagnosis.

Rare diseases can lead to a loss of physical function, cognitive impairment, communication disorders, emotional problems and even social isolation. Therefore, any of the spheres that make up the holistic view of human beings can be altered, as well as the quality of life of sufferers and their families. However, there is currently a paucity of designed and validated outcome measurement tools for people living with rare diseases. Therefore, this must be addressed, as well as the adaptation and validation of the existing generic questionnaires for each disease, so that they can be used in clinical trials.

There is no scientific evidence on a large number of aspects related to rare diseases, and protocols for action are lacking. Therefore, nurses cannot provide the most appropriate care, including those suffering from the disease and their caregivers. This means that the vast majority of health personnel do not have the appropriate training to provide quality care adapted to the altered needs of each patient.

This Special Issue aims to address the relevant aspects of pregnancy, childbirth, puerperium, breastfeeding and sexuality in the world of rare diseases, and thus to provide updated information on this field that will have a significant impact on the quality of life of patients and the training of professionals.

Systematic reviews, case studies, meta-analyses and qualitative studies are welcome in this Special Issue.

Dr. Juan Carlos Sánchez-García
Dr. Raquel Rodríguez-Blanque
Dr. Jonathan Cortés Martín
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • pregnancy
  • childbirth
  • puerperium
  • breastfeeding
  • sexuality
  • rare diseases

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 213 KiB  
Editorial
Pregnancy, Childbirth, Puerperium, Breastfeeding, and Sexuality in the World of Rare Diseases
by Raquel Rodríguez-Blanque, Juan Carlos Sánchez-García and Jonathan Cortés-Martín
Healthcare 2023, 11(9), 1351; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11091351 - 8 May 2023
Viewed by 900
Abstract
Rare diseases, also known as orphan diseases, are medical conditions that affect a small percentage of the population [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

11 pages, 236 KiB  
Article
Prenatal Breastfeeding Counseling Intervention in Women with Pre-Gestational Diabetes Mellitus—A Randomized Controlled Trial
by Tal Schiller, Tali Gassner, Yael Winter Shafran, Hilla Knobler, Ofer Schiller and Alena Kirzhner
Healthcare 2024, 12(3), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12030406 - 4 Feb 2024
Viewed by 986
Abstract
Background: Data on breastfeeding rates and targeted interventions in women with pre-gestational diabetes mellitus are inconclusive. The aim of the study was to evaluate breastfeeding rates up to one year postpartum and whether targeted counseling towards the end of pregnancy can impact breastfeeding [...] Read more.
Background: Data on breastfeeding rates and targeted interventions in women with pre-gestational diabetes mellitus are inconclusive. The aim of the study was to evaluate breastfeeding rates up to one year postpartum and whether targeted counseling towards the end of pregnancy can impact breastfeeding rates and duration. An additional goal was to evaluate whether counseling affected women’s perceptions regarding breastfeeding. Methods: Women with pre-gestational diabetes mellitus were cluster-randomized between 32 and 36 weeks of gestation, either to face-to-face instruction with a certified lactation consultant or to receive written information on breastfeeding. Thirty-eight women without diabetes served as controls and were given written information on breastfeeding. All women filled out a questionnaire regarding intended breastfeeding duration, exclusivity, and perceptions, before intervention and at three, six, and twelve months post-partum. Results: Fifty-two women with pre-gestational diabetes mellitus consented to participate. All completed the questionnaires, 26 in each group. At three, six, and twelve months postpartum, rates of any breastfeeding were around 60%, 50%, and 30%, respectively. Approximately one-third breastfed exclusively in each group at three and six months. No significant difference in breastfeeding rates was noted between face-to-face instruction, written information, and controls. End-of-pregnancy counseling improved confidence in breastfeeding knowledge and confidence in being able to manage blood glucose. Conclusions: Breastfeeding rates in pre-gestational diabetes mellitus were comparable to those of women without diabetes and were unchanged by mode of instruction at the end of pregnancy. However, targeted diabetes-oriented breastfeeding instruction at the end of pregnancy improved knowledge and confidence among women with pre-gestational diabetes mellitus. Full article
13 pages, 810 KiB  
Article
Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding and Maternal Sexuality among Polish Women: A Preliminary Report
by Anna Weronika Szablewska, Anna Michalik, Agnieszka Czerwińska-Osipiak, Sebastian Artur Zdończyk, Marcin Śniadecki, Katarzyna Bukato and Wanda Kwiatkowska
Healthcare 2024, 12(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12010038 - 23 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Although postpartum sexual problems are common, there is a poor understanding of the underlying influencing factors and the impact of the infant feeding method on the mother’s sexual life. A cross-sectional control study was conducted with a group of 253 women during their [...] Read more.
Although postpartum sexual problems are common, there is a poor understanding of the underlying influencing factors and the impact of the infant feeding method on the mother’s sexual life. A cross-sectional control study was conducted with a group of 253 women during their postpartum period. This study aimed to investigate the effects of different infant feeding methods on female sexual life after childbirth. The study followed the STROBE guidelines for cross-sectional control analysis. The study design included a questionnaire characterizing sociodemographic, obstetric and breastfeeding variables and the PL-FSFI (Female Sexual Function Index). The authors collected the data in compliance with the CAWI (Computer-Assisted Web Interview) research methodology—an interview conducted via an Internet channel. Each respondent received and completed the survey provided to them via the same online link. This study included women in the postpartum period: 170 breastfeeding women (study group) and 83 formula-feeding women (control group). There were statistically significant difference between the groups that practiced different types of breastfeeding. Out of all the PL-FSFI-assessing domains, the highest average score for the whole group correlated with satisfaction and the lowest score correlated with lubrication use. Our findings indicate that women practicing only breastfeeding are more likely to develop sexual problems. In order to maintain sexual health and promote long-term breastfeeding, extensive and professional counseling is needed for couples about postpartum sexuality and the factors that affect it, such as breastfeeding. Full article
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