Special Issue "Mindfulness in Healthcare"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Nursing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Helen Noble
Website
Guest Editor
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
Interests: chronic kidney disease; palliative care; qualitative research methods; mixed methods; end of life care
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ian Walsh
Website
Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
Interests: mindfulness; medicine and humanities; cognition and metacognition; human factors; healthcare education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Healthcare will focus on mindfulness in healthcare and mindful self-compassion. Mindfulness is known to positively impact numerous measures of personal health, including stress, anxiety, and depression, and improve mental and physical health. Mindfulness-based interventions have been effective in relieving pain and other symptoms, supporting and enhancing resilience, and improving academic success. In addition, both interpersonal relationships and behavioral clinical skills are improved by fostering and developing empathy and compassion. Mindfulness training is therefore promoted among healthcare providers and patients alike. Its huge potential to promote health and enrich the lives of those who participate is encouraged in healthcare. In addition, mindful self-compassion which is the combination of mindfulness skills and practice with the emotional practice of self-compassion offers participants the motivation to encourage and self-soothe when we suffer or feel inadequate.

We welcome papers exploring the cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms underlying the benefits of mindfulness and mindfulness self-compassion training; and mindfulness-based interventions to improve stress, resilience, and general well-being for both patients and healthcare staff and the impact of innovative mindfulness training programs in healthcare. We will feature original research and include interesting clinical studies, reviews, short reports, narratives, and opinion pieces from researchers interested in this research topic.

Dr. Helen Noble
Dr. Ian Walsh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mindfulness
  • Mindfulness-based stress reduction
  • Compassion
  • Healthcare
  • Well-being

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Living the Full Catastrophe: A Mindfulness-Based Program to Support Recovery from Stroke
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 498; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040498 - 19 Nov 2020
Abstract
Decades of research suggest that Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) training supports a greater capacity to live with chronic medical conditions and contributes to lowering stress levels. This paper introduces a model for a Mindfulness-Based Recovery from Stroke (MBRfS) for promoting stroke recovery, informed [...] Read more.
Decades of research suggest that Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) training supports a greater capacity to live with chronic medical conditions and contributes to lowering stress levels. This paper introduces a model for a Mindfulness-Based Recovery from Stroke (MBRfS) for promoting stroke recovery, informed by the lived experience of the author (a stroke survivor and certified MBSR instructor), the research literature regarding MBSR training, and the specific challenges of stroke recovery. Four themes emerged from the autoethnographic analysis that informed the proposed model: Readiness to accept the stroke event and the acquired brain injury, navigating uncertainties of stroke recovery with awareness and self-responsibility for outcomes, trusting the inherent wisdom of the body as a stroke recovery “teacher”, and increased capacity to integrate complex emotions with self-compassion, and a sense of wholeness. A four-component MBRfS model is offered, which consists of an integration amongst a modified MBSR framework, emergent attitudinal themes, and insights from the autoethnographic vignettes. The MBRfS model offers a path for providing participants with a supportive experience within stroke recovery. Recommendations and suggestions for future studies are offered to support the development of MBRfS for stroke survivors and their caregivers, as well as contributing to healthcare providers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mindfulness in Healthcare)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Loving-Kindness Meditation on Flight Attendants’ Spirituality, Mindfulness and Subjective Well-Being
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020174 - 16 Jun 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Background: This study investigated: (1) the effects of the loving-kindness meditation (LKM) on mindfulness, subjective well-being (SWB), and spirituality and (2) the relationships between mindfulness, spirituality, and SWB. Methods: 98 flight attendants from Xiamen Airlines in China were recruited and randomly [...] Read more.
Background: This study investigated: (1) the effects of the loving-kindness meditation (LKM) on mindfulness, subjective well-being (SWB), and spirituality and (2) the relationships between mindfulness, spirituality, and SWB. Methods: 98 flight attendants from Xiamen Airlines in China were recruited and randomly assigned to the LKM training group (n = 49) or the waiting control group (n = 49). The LKM training group underwent an 8-week LKM training intervention, and the control group did not undergo intervention. The three main variables (SWB, mindfulness, and spirituality) were measured both before (pre-test) and after (post-test) the LKM training intervention. Results: In the experimental group, SWB and spirituality increased significantly. In the control group, no significant differences were observed for the three variables between the pre-test and post-test. Conclusions: Our results indicated that LKM may help to improve SWB and spirituality. However, the mechanisms which underlie the effects of the LKM on mindfulness, spirituality, SWB, and other psychological constructs require further elucidation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mindfulness in Healthcare)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Mindfulness in Family Caregivers of Persons with Dementia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030193 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Social and healthcare problems associated with dementia not only affect those who suffer from this disease, but their caregivers as well. The purpose of this study was to analyze the efficacy of mindfulness intervention on psychological variables of caregivers of persons with dementia. [...] Read more.
Social and healthcare problems associated with dementia not only affect those who suffer from this disease, but their caregivers as well. The purpose of this study was to analyze the efficacy of mindfulness intervention on psychological variables of caregivers of persons with dementia. A search for scientific articles published from 2000 to 2019 in the PubMed, Web of Science and PsycINFO databases found a total of 282 articles. After screening with preestablished inclusion criteria, ten studies with participation of 161 caregivers remained for the meta-analysis. The results were significant in favor of mindfulness intervention for the variables studied with a standardized difference of mean of 0.71 at a 95% CI, 0.71 (0.52, 0.89); p ≤ 0.00001. Heterogeneity of the studies included was moderate (I2 = 40%). The main conclusion suggested by empirical evidence was that mindfulness intervention seems to be effective for the variables analyzed. However, continued in-depth study of this subject is recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mindfulness in Healthcare)
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