Special Issue "Hospital Care and Outcomes for Obese Patients"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Perioperative Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 26 February 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tracy Comans
Website
Guest Editor
The University of Queensland, Centre for Health Services Research, Brisbane, Australia
Interests: health economics; quality of life; care of older people; rehabilitation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Adrienne Young
Website
Guest Editor
Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia
Interests: Obesity; Bariatrics; Hospital Care; Cost of care

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Obesity is a known risk factor for prolonged hospital stays and worse outcomes following medical intervention. Rising levels of obesity impact the way hospitals can deliver care for inpatients. This Special Issue is concerned with measuring the impact of obesity on resource use and models of care in hospitals. Key outcomes of interest include the use of specialized equipment such as bariatric beds, impact on nursing care, staff injury, length of stay, adverse events, and patient-related outcomes.

Dr. Tracy Comans
Dr. Adrienne Young
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hospitals
  • Obesity
  • Models of care

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Impact of Nutrition Care Process Documentation in Obese Children and Adolescents with Metabolic Syndrome and/or Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020188 - 09 Feb 2021
Abstract
This study evaluated the Nutrition Care Process documentation used by dietitians for obese pediatric patients diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and/or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its impact on the achievement of nutritional goals. This retrospective cohort study utilized data retrieved from [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the Nutrition Care Process documentation used by dietitians for obese pediatric patients diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and/or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its impact on the achievement of nutritional goals. This retrospective cohort study utilized data retrieved from three tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh. A total of 142 obese pediatric patients aged 8–18 years diagnosed with NAFLD and/or MetS were evaluated. Data on weight, height, blood pressure (BP), lipid profile, and liver enzymes were collected. A validated audit was used to assess the documentation quality. Twenty-seven (46.6%) dietitian notes received a high score, 21 (36.2%) received a medium score, and 10 (17.2%) received a low score. There was no significant effect of dietitian audit scores on nutritional outcomes, however, the change in body mass index from 6 to 12 months follow-up period was inversely correlated with the audit score (r = −0.761, p = 0.007), and alkaline phosphatase was inversely correlated with the audit score (r = −0.819, p = 0.013). In conclusion, there was a clear variation in the quality of dietitians’ documentation and the impact of documentation scores on nutritional outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hospital Care and Outcomes for Obese Patients)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Exploring the Impact of Obesity on Health Care Resources and Coding in the Acute Hospital Setting: A Feasibility Study
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 459; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040459 - 04 Nov 2020
Abstract
Obesity is costly, yet there have been few attempts to estimate the actual costs of providing hospital care to the obese inpatient. This study aimed to test the feasibility of measuring obesity-related health care costs and accuracy of coding data for acute inpatients. [...] Read more.
Obesity is costly, yet there have been few attempts to estimate the actual costs of providing hospital care to the obese inpatient. This study aimed to test the feasibility of measuring obesity-related health care costs and accuracy of coding data for acute inpatients. A prospective observational study was conducted over three weeks in June 2018 in a single orthopaedic ward of a metropolitan tertiary hospital in Queensland, Australia. Demographic data, anthropometric measurements, clinical characteristics, cost of hospital encounter and coding data were collected. Complete demographic, anthropometric and clinical data were collected for all 18 participants. Hospital costing reports and coding data were not available within the study timeframe. Participant recruitment and data collection were resource-intensive, with mobility assistance required to obtain anthropometric measurements in more than half of the participants. Greater staff time and costs were seen in participants with obesity compared to those without obesity (obesity: body mass index ≥ 30), though large standard deviations indicate wide variance. Data collected suggest that obesity-related cost and resource use amongst acute inpatients require further exploration. This study provides recommendations for protocol refinement to improve the accuracy of data collected for future studies measuring the actual cost of providing hospital care to obese inpatients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hospital Care and Outcomes for Obese Patients)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Underreporting of Obesity in Hospital Inpatients: A Comparison of Body Mass Index and Administrative Documentation in Australian Hospitals
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 334; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030334 - 11 Sep 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Despite its high prevalence, there is no systematic approach to documenting and coding obesity in hospitals. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of obesity among inpatients, the proportion of obese patients recognised as obese by hospital administration, and the cost associated with [...] Read more.
Despite its high prevalence, there is no systematic approach to documenting and coding obesity in hospitals. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of obesity among inpatients, the proportion of obese patients recognised as obese by hospital administration, and the cost associated with their admission. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in three hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Inpatients present on three audit days were included in this study. Data collected were age, sex, height, and weight. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated in accordance with the World Health Organization’s definition. Administrative data were sourced from hospital records departments to determine the number of patients officially documented as obese. Total actual costing data were sourced from hospital finance departments. From a combined cohort of n = 1327 inpatients (57% male, mean (SD) age: 61 (19) years, BMI: 28 (9) kg/m2), the prevalence of obesity was 32% (n = 421). Only half of obese patients were recognised as obese by hospital administration. A large variation in the cost of admission across BMI categories prohibited any statistical determination of difference. Obesity is highly prevalent among hospital inpatients in Queensland, Australia. Current methods of identifying obesity for administrative/funding purposes are not accurate and would benefit from reforms to measure the true impact of healthcare costs from obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hospital Care and Outcomes for Obese Patients)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop