Special Issue "Micromechanics of Reservoir and Cap Rocks"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Alexandre Dimanov

Laboratoire de Mecanique des Solides Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: rheology; polyphase/polycrystal micro mechanics; homogenization; crystal plasticity; grain boundary sliding; solution-precipitation; in situ mechanical testing; full mechancal field measurements; digital image correlation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Micromechanics of cap and reservoir rocks is a Special Issue of Geosciences intending to highlight recent fundamental and applied research on the micromechanical behaviour of major  reservoir rocks as carbonates and their usual cap rocks as shales and halite. The latter are the most important rocks for oil and green energy industries.

Besides for oil production, understanding the mechanical behaviour of carbonates, shales and halite rocks is of fundamental importance for geotechnical applications concerned with underground energy storage in depleted reservoir rocks, or in solution mined caverns. The latter includes both the classical storage of hydrocarbon, but also new perspectives for sustainable development, based on storage of hydrogen or compressed air energy. Aditionnaly, rock salt mines and shales are still envisaged for nuclear waste repositories. Depleted carbonate reservoirs and salt caverns are also potential candidates for CO2 sequestration.

In this Special Issue we put forward the micromechanical aspects of these materials because they are the key for understanding the macroscopic mechanical and petrophysical properties, which depend on the inherent microstructural heterogeneities.

In summary, I would like to invite you to submit your recent theoretical or experimental research, or natural case studies of carbonates, shales or halite, with respect to the micromechanical aspects and deformation mechanisms and related microstructural evolution. For instance, we encourage in situ characterization techniques and numerical modeling of multiphysic couplings and fluid-rock interactions.

Dr. Alexandre Dimanov

Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Defect microstructures
  • Crystal/polycrystal plasticity
  • Localization
  • Dynamic recrystallization
  • Grain boundary migration
  • Solution creep
  • Interfacial mass transfer
  • Grain boundary sliding
  • Interfacial cavitation
  • Microdamage
  • In situ micromechanical tests
  • Elasto visco plastic modelling
  • Full field measurements

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Finite Element Simulations of an Elasto-Viscoplastic Model for Clay
Geosciences 2019, 9(3), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9030145
Received: 19 February 2019 / Revised: 14 March 2019 / Accepted: 19 March 2019 / Published: 26 March 2019
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Abstract
In this paper, we develop an elasto-viscoplastic (EVP) model for clay using the non-associated flow rule. This is accomplished by using a modified form of the Perzyna’s overstressed EVP theory, the critical state soil mechanics, and the multi-surface theory. The new model includes [...] Read more.
In this paper, we develop an elasto-viscoplastic (EVP) model for clay using the non-associated flow rule. This is accomplished by using a modified form of the Perzyna’s overstressed EVP theory, the critical state soil mechanics, and the multi-surface theory. The new model includes six parameters, five of which are identical to those in the critical state soil mechanics model. The other parameter is the generalized nonlinear secondary compression index. The EVP model was implemented in a nonlinear coupled consolidated code using a finite-element numerical algorithm (AFENA). We then tested the model for different clays, such as the Osaka clay, the San Francisco Bay Mud clay, the Kaolin clay, and the Hong Kong Marine Deposit clay. The numerical results show good agreement with the experimental data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micromechanics of Reservoir and Cap Rocks)
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Open AccessArticle
Nanoindentation Studies of Plasticity and Dislocation Creep in Halite
Geosciences 2019, 9(2), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9020079
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 1 February 2019 / Accepted: 3 February 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
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Abstract
Previous deformation experiments on halite have collectively explored different creep mechanisms, including dislocation creep and pressure solution. Here, we use an alternative to conventional uniaxial or triaxial deformation experiments—nanoindentation tests—to measure the hardness and creep behavior of single crystals of halite at room [...] Read more.
Previous deformation experiments on halite have collectively explored different creep mechanisms, including dislocation creep and pressure solution. Here, we use an alternative to conventional uniaxial or triaxial deformation experiments—nanoindentation tests—to measure the hardness and creep behavior of single crystals of halite at room temperature. The hardness tests reveal two key phenomena: (1) strain rate-dependent hardness characterized by a value of the stress exponent of ~25, and (2) an indentation size effect, whereby hardness decreases with increasing size of the indents. Indentation creep tests were performed for hold times ranging from 3600 to 106 s, with a constant load of 100 mN. For hold times longer than 3 × 104 s, a transition from plasticity to power-law creep is observed as the stress decreases during the hold, with the latter characterized by a value of the stress exponent of 4.87 ± 0.91. An existing theoretical analysis allows us to directly compare our indentation creep data with dislocation creep flow laws for halite derived from triaxial experiments on polycrystalline samples. Using this analysis, we show an excellent agreement between our data and the flow laws, with the strain rate at a given stress varying by less than 5% for a commonly used flow law. Our results underscore the utility of using nanoindentation as an alternative to more conventional methods to measure the creep behavior of geological materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micromechanics of Reservoir and Cap Rocks)
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