Special Issue "Geo-Hydrological Risks Management"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Hazards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Danilo Godone
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geohazard Monitoring Group, Research Institute for Hydrogeological Prevention and Protection, National Research Council, 10135 Turin, Italy
Interests: natural hazard monitoring; landslides; glaciers; natural disasters; geomatics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Changdong Li
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China
Interests: evolution of geohazards; susceptibility of landslide; slope stability; test and monitoring technolgy; retaining structure
Dr. Louise Vick
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geosciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 9019 Tromsø, Norway
Interests: landslide; geohazards; engineering geology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Geosciences aims to gather, high-quality, original research articles and technical notes on the use of geosciences, applied to geo-hydrological risk management. The Special Issue will highlight case studies, best practices, and applied research.
The use of geoscience tools is an, undeniable, added value when coping with natural disasters and their risk management. Survey devices, both close range (e.g., GNSS) and remote (e.g., UAVs, remote sensing) and mapping tools, such as G.I.S., contribute to improve the knowledge of investigated phenomena and, consequently, their risk management. Thanks to the accuracy and richness of geometric and thematic data, risk management is facilitated by and contributes to, among others, risk mitigation and the development of sustainable adaptation strategies.
Therefore, I would like to invite you to submit recent work, in the form of an article, concerning the above-mentioned topics. The use of open source approaches is highly appreciated. The preliminary submission of a short abstract outlining the aims of the research and its main results is encouraged in order to check, at an early stage, if the contribution fits the scope of the Special Issue.

Dr. Danilo Godone
Dr. Louise Vick
Prof. Changdong Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • geomatics
  • survey and mapping tools
  • knowledge improvement
  • risk mitigation
  • sustainable adaptation strategies

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Physics and Modeling of Various Hazardous Landslides
Geosciences 2021, 11(3), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11030108 - 01 Mar 2021
Viewed by 611
Abstract
In 2014, the Varnes classification system for landslides was updated. Complex landslides can still be a problem to classify as the classification does not include the flow type in the hydrodynamical sense. Three examples of Icelandic landslides are presented and later used as [...] Read more.
In 2014, the Varnes classification system for landslides was updated. Complex landslides can still be a problem to classify as the classification does not include the flow type in the hydrodynamical sense. Three examples of Icelandic landslides are presented and later used as case studies in order to demonstrate the methods suggested to analyze the flow. The methods are based on the different physical properties of the flow types of the slides. Three different flow types are presented, named type (i), (ii), and (iii). Types (i) and (ii) do not include turbulent flows and their flow paths are sometimes independent of the velocity. Type (iii) include high velocity flows; they are treated with the translator wave theory, where a new type of a slope factor is used. It allows the slide to stop when the slope has flattened out to the value that corresponds to the stable slope property of the flowing material. The type studies are for a fast slide of this type, also a large slip circle slide that turns into a fast-flowing slide farther down the path and finally a large slide running so fast that it can run for a kilometer on flat land where it stops with a steep front. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Hydrological Risks Management)
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Article
A Framework for Risk-Based Cost–Benefit Analysis for Decision Support on Hydrogeological Risks in Underground Construction
Geosciences 2021, 11(2), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11020082 - 12 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1087
Abstract
Construction below the ground surface and underneath the groundwater table is often associated with groundwater leakage and drawdowns in the surroundings which subsequently can result in a wide variety of risks. To avoid groundwater drawdown-associated damages, risk-reducing measures must often be implemented. Due [...] Read more.
Construction below the ground surface and underneath the groundwater table is often associated with groundwater leakage and drawdowns in the surroundings which subsequently can result in a wide variety of risks. To avoid groundwater drawdown-associated damages, risk-reducing measures must often be implemented. Due to the hydrogeological system’s inherent variability and our incomplete knowledge of its conditions, the effects of risk-reducing measures cannot be fully known in advance and decisions must inevitably be made under uncertainty. When implementing risk-reducing measures there is always a trade-off between the measures’ benefits (reduced risk) and investment costs which needs to be balanced. In this paper, we present a framework for decision support on measures to mitigate hydrogeological risks in underground construction. The framework is developed in accordance with the guidelines from the International Standardization Organization (ISO) and comprises a full risk-management framework with focus on risk analysis and risk evaluation. Cost–benefit analysis (CBA) facilitates monetization of consequences and economic evaluation of risk mitigation. The framework includes probabilistic risk estimation of the entire cause–effect chain from groundwater leakage to the consequences of damage where expert elicitation is combined with data-driven and process-based methods, allowing for continuous updating when new knowledge is obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Hydrological Risks Management)
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Article
Rainfall Flooding in Urban Areas in the Context of Geomorphological Aspects
Geosciences 2020, 10(11), 457; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10110457 - 12 Nov 2020
Viewed by 763
Abstract
Flooding risk in urban areas is particularly high, due to the high population density and property values, including those of transport, residential, service and industrial infrastructure, among others. There are many reasons for flooding in urban areas; among them, direct heavy rainfall can [...] Read more.
Flooding risk in urban areas is particularly high, due to the high population density and property values, including those of transport, residential, service and industrial infrastructure, among others. There are many reasons for flooding in urban areas; among them, direct heavy rainfall can cause special problems in risk management. In the case of random heavy rainfall, flood risk management can be supported by information about the morphology of the terrain and the degree of its sealing. In this study, we analyse methods for determining the risk of flooding in urban areas using digital terrain model (DTM) and geographic information system (GIS) tools. Predictors of precipitation floods in urban areas are defined, including the determination of flat areas, areas without outflow (non-drainage) and with large terrain height differences. The main source of information about historical rainfall floods relates to interventions by fire brigades, which constitute the basis for verifying the areas of occurrence of rainfall floods, as determined on the basis of morphological analysis of the area. Identifying the locations of rainfall flooding areas and developing accurate maps based on them are crucial for spatial planning and flood management at the local scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Hydrological Risks Management)
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Article
Intensity Assessment of Erosion-Accumulative Processes in the Selenga Middle Mountains (Case Study of the Gully Network of the Nizhnyaya Bulanka Depression, Western Transbaikalia)
Geosciences 2020, 10(10), 387; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10100387 - 28 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 710
Abstract
The advantages of a quantitative assessment of the spatial and temporal variability of the boundaries and volumes of ravines using modern means and methods of aerial photography from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) are substantiated, in contrast to traditional survey methods (linear method [...] Read more.
The advantages of a quantitative assessment of the spatial and temporal variability of the boundaries and volumes of ravines using modern means and methods of aerial photography from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) are substantiated, in contrast to traditional survey methods (linear method of benchmarks, tacheometric, aerial and space photography, laser scanning). The erosion zoning and mapping of linear and gully formations on the territory of the Kuitunka, Tarbagataika, and Kunaleika river basins (Selenga middle mountains) are carried out. The reanalysis data were used to assess extreme meteorological events leading to the acceleration of erosion processes. Paleontological material confirms the long duration of erosive-accumulative processes in the Nizhnyaya Bulanka depression. High-accuracy multi-temporal orthophotomaps and digital elevation models of Bulanka gully using unmanned aerial vehicles were produced. The method of quantitative estimation of gully formation rates is offered, which allows estimating with high accuracy the change of area and volume characteristics of erosive forms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Hydrological Risks Management)
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Article
Mapping of GIS-Flood Hazard Using the Geomorphometric-Hazard Model: Case Study of the Al-Shamal Train Pathway in the City of Qurayyat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Geosciences 2020, 10(9), 333; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10090333 - 22 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1199
Abstract
Drainage basins in dry and semiarid environments are exposed to sudden, irregular flooding that poses a threat to urban areas and infrastructure. The associated risk is exacerbated by land use changes. Geomorphometric analyses of drainage basins based on geographic information systems (GIS) are [...] Read more.
Drainage basins in dry and semiarid environments are exposed to sudden, irregular flooding that poses a threat to urban areas and infrastructure. The associated risk is exacerbated by land use changes. Geomorphometric analyses of drainage basins based on geographic information systems (GIS) are essential tools for assessing conceptual flood hazards. Geomorphological data extracted from high-precision digital elevation models (DEMs) provide valuable information for modeling the geomorphic, surface classifications of the earth, and for flood hazard mapping. This study aimed to develop an integrative approach to the mapping of flood hazards along the Al-Shamal train pathway in the city of Qurayyat in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) using GIS and hazard modeling for geomorphological ranking. Furthermore, we propose strategic solutions to provide mitigation and protection from negative impacts with the aim of improving the level of awareness of flood geomorphology. The hazard model of geomorphological ranking was used in mapping and calculating the degree of hazards using 24 geomorphometric criteria. These criteria were divided into formal criteria, terrain criteria, and criteria related to the drainage network. The results of the study revealed that the drainage sub-basins are exposed to flood hazards along the Al-Shamal train pathway in the city of Qurayyat. The very high flood hazard constituted 4228.3 km2, accounting for 70.3% and 65.7%, respectively, of the drainage basins of the wadis of Makhrouq and Bayer. The high flood hazard represented 61% (4712.4 km2) of the basin of the wadis of Sarmadaa. The medium flood hazard was concentrated in the drainage basin of the wadi of Hasidah, accounting for nearly 57.7% (1271.3 km2). The very low flood hazard was present in 46.5% of the drainage basin of the wadis of Hasidah Umm Nakhla, accounting for an area of 799.4 km2. The methodology applied in this study can be used in the estimation of flood hazards in different drainage basins throughout Saudi Arabia and in similar arid regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Hydrological Risks Management)
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