Special Issue "Gender, Macroeconomics and Macroeconomic Polices"

A special issue of Economies (ISSN 2227-7099).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nilufer Cagatay
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
Interests: Gender and macroeconomics, gender and trade, gender and poverty, gender and fiscal policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gender is being increasingly recognized as an analytical category in macroeconomics and macroeconomic policy analyses. Gender inequalities impact macroeconomic performance and macroeconomic policy outcomes. Earlier policies for this research focused on the structural adjustment and macroeconomic stabilization in developing economies. More recently, austerity policies put into place in a number of advanced capitalist economies has spurred interest and research in gender and macroeconomics in the context of such economies. 

Research on gender and macroeconomics (as well as international trade and finance) has spanned: (a) macroeconomic modelling with gender; (b) empirical studies devoted to gender inequalities and growth and development; (c) research on gender-bias in macroeconomic policies; (d) policy simulations for gender-equitable macroeconomic policy formulation. Many researchers working on gender and macroeconomics have expanded the study of macroeconomics to include the interlinkages between paid work and unpaid care and domestic work, and the macroeconomic implications of these interlinkages. 

This Special Issue will be devoted to furthering research in modelling, empirical and policy work, including policy simulations. Papers may include, but are not restricted to, studies on gender inequalities and growth and development; growth and gender wage gaps; gender and economic crises; gender-bias in fiscal policies, gender responsive budgeting (GRB), monetary policy and gender inequalities, the impact of gender wage gaps on international trade performance; the impact of trade performance on gender wage gaps and gendered employment patterns; unpaid–paid work connections in macroeconomic analysis; time poverty; gendered analyses of employment, unemployment and under-employment; social infrastructure of care and the care economy; gendered analyses of poverty and anti-poverty policies; technical change, gender inequalities and macroeconomic outcomes; gender-aware macroeconomic policy simulations; gender and social protection policies.

Prof. Dr. Nilufer Cagatay
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Economies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gender
  • gender and international trade
  • gender and trade agreements
  • Gender-responsive budgets
  • inequalities
  • wage gap
  • unpaid-paid work
  • anti-poverty policies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Distributional Differences and the Native American Gender Wage Gap
Economies 2019, 7(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/economies7020046 - 14 May 2019
Abstract
We use the Theil index and data from the 2012–2016, American Community Survey 5-Year Sample to document and analyze gender wage inequality for American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) women across single, multiracial and ethnic identity groups. Mean differences in hourly wages by [...] Read more.
We use the Theil index and data from the 2012–2016, American Community Survey 5-Year Sample to document and analyze gender wage inequality for American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) women across single, multiracial and ethnic identity groups. Mean differences in hourly wages by gender contribute little to measured wage inequality when individuals are separated based upon their proximity to tribal homeland areas. Instead, we find between-group wage inequality is a function of glass-ceiling effects that differ by AIAN identification and homeland area. Differences in glass-ceiling effects across AIAN identity groups suggest the need to disaggregate data by AIAN ethnic identity. Furthermore, under certain circumstances, it may be appropriate to combine some racial AIAN identity groups into a single population even if the focus is to study policy impacts on citizens of federally recognized AIAN nations for those using government survey data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender, Macroeconomics and Macroeconomic Polices)

Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Gender and Comparative Advantage: Feminist–Heterodox Theorizing about Globalization
Economies 2019, 7(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/economies7020035 - 06 May 2019
Abstract
Heterodox feminist scholars have argued that global trade patterns reflect patterns of competitive advantage—rather than comparative advantage—and that that competitive advantage is gendered. Further, they have suggested that we need more theoretical and empirical scholarship in this area. This paper assesses the state [...] Read more.
Heterodox feminist scholars have argued that global trade patterns reflect patterns of competitive advantage—rather than comparative advantage—and that that competitive advantage is gendered. Further, they have suggested that we need more theoretical and empirical scholarship in this area. This paper assesses the state of the literature against this call to action for more feminist–heterodox work on trade, with an emphasis on the manufacturing sector. New strands on the impact of gender on global production have been developed, including (a) integrating gender relations into global value chain analysis, (b) empirical work examining possible trends in the de-feminization of industrial sectors with technological upgrading, and (c) conceptual and empirical work on the interplay between gender, social provisioning, informal work, and the informalization of formal work. The first two strands, although well developed, would benefit from more research that is better integrated with the third strand. Further, this whole range of scholarly work needs to contend more broadly with the causes and effects of persistent gender-based occupational segregation, which underpins all three strands of work. A lot of excellent work has been done, and yet, more scholarship is needed to best understand the extent to which employment in industrial exports can function as a means to gender equity, empowerment, and mobility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender, Macroeconomics and Macroeconomic Polices)
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