Special Issue "Economic Development in Africa"

A special issue of Economies (ISSN 2227-7099).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Frank W. Agbola

Newcastle Business School, The Unviersity of Newcastle, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Applied Econometrics, Development Economics, Agricultural Economics, International Economics, Financial Economics, Tourism Economics and SMEs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In a changing and unpredictable global economy, Africa is at a crossroads. Despite efforts by governments in Africa to sustain economic growth and development, the recent trajectory appears mixed. Many countries in Africa continue to experience increasing poverty, environmental degradation and other serious problems. These issues have become increasingly important following the global financial crisis where African countries have experienced declines in capital flows and slowing of economies. The widespread global challenges have meant the need for African countries to develop effective policies for ensuring sustainable economic growth and development. This Special Issue is devoted to examining the major challenges facing African countries and exploring the opportunities for achieving sustainable economic growth and development in the changing and ever volatile global economy. We welcome original papers relating to all aspects of economic growth and development in Africa.

Frank W. Agbola
Associate Professor of Economics
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Economies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Democracy and Inter-Regional Trade Enhancement in Sub-Saharan Africa: Gravity Model
Received: 10 February 2018 / Revised: 25 July 2018 / Accepted: 25 July 2018 / Published: 6 August 2018
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Abstract
There has been considerable research on the effect of democracy on trade openness since the 1980s when development strategies toward free trade and democracy were rapidly adopted in developing countries. Most studies have focused on Asian, Latin American, and former soviet bloc countries
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There has been considerable research on the effect of democracy on trade openness since the 1980s when development strategies toward free trade and democracy were rapidly adopted in developing countries. Most studies have focused on Asian, Latin American, and former soviet bloc countries and few studies have focused on Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This study is an attempt to fill that gap and uses a gravity model approach to test the effects of democracy in SSA on trade. Our results show that democracy has substantial impact on openness to trade and SSA democratic countries will trade more with other countries irrespective of their level of democracy, when compared to non-democratic countries. The results do not vary much even when we use different sources of democracy variable. Also, democratic countries trade more among each other perhaps due to having a shared business environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Development in Africa)
Open AccessArticle Did the Plan Sénégal Emergent Affect Cropping Decisions in the Senegal River Basin?
Received: 30 March 2018 / Revised: 2 June 2018 / Accepted: 11 July 2018 / Published: 23 July 2018
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Abstract
One of the basic debates in African development is whether agriculture can be the instrument for the transformation of a rural economy. A common question is whether agricultural policies can provide the impetus to move agriculture in developing economies from subsistence to commercial
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One of the basic debates in African development is whether agriculture can be the instrument for the transformation of a rural economy. A common question is whether agricultural policies can provide the impetus to move agriculture in developing economies from subsistence to commercial agriculture. Senegal’s Plan Sénégal Emergent (PSE) provides a data point in this discussion. Senegal and international donors invested in agricultural supply chains starting in 2012 to facilitate the emergence of commercial agriculture for peanuts, rice, and vegetables. This study focuses on these investments in the Senegal River Valley of northern Senegal. The empirical results presented in this study provide evidence that farms in the Senegal River Valley impacted by PSE have moved away from subsistence agriculture by planting more hectares in commercial crops. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Development in Africa)
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Open AccessArticle Private Sector Credit and Inflation Volatility
Received: 8 December 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2018 / Accepted: 2 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
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Abstract
This paper investigates the effect of inflation volatility on private sector credit growth. The results indicate that private sector credit growth is positively linked to the one period lagged inflation volatility. Given that past monetary policy actions continue to affect the targeted variables
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This paper investigates the effect of inflation volatility on private sector credit growth. The results indicate that private sector credit growth is positively linked to the one period lagged inflation volatility. Given that past monetary policy actions continue to affect the targeted variables due to the substantial lags in the transmission mechanism, the positive response of private sector credit growth to past inflation volatility suggests a credible monetary policy regime in Uganda, which has led to a reduction in the level of macroeconomic uncertainty and the restoration of favorable economic conditions and prospects, thus increasing the demand for credit. Further, the study finds that the lagged private sector credit growth, nominal exchange rate, and inflation have a statistically significant effect on private sector credit growth while financial innovation, interest rates, and GDP growth appear not to be important determinants of private sector credit growth. The robustness of our findings is confirmed by sensitivity checks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Development in Africa)
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