Sleep–Wake Medicine

A special issue of Clinical and Translational Neuroscience (ISSN 2514-183X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2022) | Viewed by 6592

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Inselspital University Hospital of Bern, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
Interests: sleep medicine; sleep–wake cycle; REM sleep; NREM sleep; narcolepsy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Neurology, Inselspital University Hospital of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
Interests: general neurology; sleep-wake medicine; coma/disorders of consciousness; stroke medicine; Parkinson's movement disorders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite the fact that the states of sleep are universally described throughout the animal kingdom, our understanding of their contributions to brain function and dysfunction remains limited. Amassing evidence reveals close interactions between the brain and the body in the circadian organization of sleep and its homeostasis. It is therefore not surprising that disorders of the brain and the body are often associated with pre-symptomatic sleep perturbations. The understanding of both the fundamental and pathophysiological mechanisms of sleep control has benefitted from technological advances used in experimental and clinical contexts; however, the questions of “Why do we sleep?”; “What are the functions of sleep?” and “Why doesn’t our brain sleep when we are resting?” remain unanswered.

Recent progress triggered several paradigm shifts such as “global-to-local sleep control”, “single-to-multiple sleep circuits” or “Hebbian-to-non-Hebbian information consolidation” that have opened new hypotheses on the origin, functions and representations of sleep in neuroscience, medicine and in society. For this Special Issue, we aim to assemble empirical papers, targeted reviews and opinion pieces that will showcase our current understanding of the pathological association between sleep and neurological or psychiatric disorders and possible pathophysiological mechanisms in both animal and human models.

All types of papers are encouraged (research papers, targeted reviews, meta-analyses and commentaries, interviews). Manuscripts can cover studies in animals and/or humans, as well as theoretical concepts. Behavioral and/or pharmacological studies are welcome, but should be placed within the broader sleep medicine context.

Prof. Dr. Antoine Adamantidis
Dr. Markus Schmidt
Prof. Dr. Claudio Bassetti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Clinical and Translational Neuroscience is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sleep–wake medicine
  • circadian rhythm
  • REM sleep
  • NREM sleep
  • sleep disorders
  • narcolepsy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

38 pages, 12042 KiB  
Review
The Parasomnias and Sleep Related Movement Disorders—A Look Back at Six Decades of Scientific Studies
by Roger J. Broughton
Clin. Transl. Neurosci. 2022, 6(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/ctn6010003 - 31 Jan 2022
Viewed by 5845
Abstract
The objective of this article is to provide a comprehensive personal survey of all the major parasomnias with coverage of their clinical presentation, investigation, physiopathogenesis and treatment. These include the four major members of the slow-wave sleep arousal parasomnias which are enuresis nocturna [...] Read more.
The objective of this article is to provide a comprehensive personal survey of all the major parasomnias with coverage of their clinical presentation, investigation, physiopathogenesis and treatment. These include the four major members of the slow-wave sleep arousal parasomnias which are enuresis nocturna (bedwetting), somnambulism (sleepwalking), sleep terrors (pavor nocturnus in children, incubus attacks in adults) and confusional arousals (sleep drunkenness). Other parasomnias covered are sleep-related aggression, hypnagogic and hypnopompic terrifying hallucinations, REM sleep terrifying dreams, nocturnal anxiety attacks, sleep paralysis, sleep talking (somniloquy), sexsomnia, REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), nocturnal paroxysmal dystonia, sleep starts (hypnic jerks), jactatio capitis nocturna (head and total body rocking), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMs), hypnagogic foot tremor, restless leg syndrome (Ekbom syndrome), exploding head syndrome, excessive fragmentary myoclonus, nocturnal cramps, and sleep-related epileptic seizures. There is interest in the possibility of relationships between sleep/wake states and creativity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep–Wake Medicine)
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