Special Issue "Shift-Work and the Individual II"

A special issue of Clocks & Sleep (ISSN 2624-5175). This special issue belongs to the section "Society".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 3964

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Thomas Kantermann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. University of Applied Sciences for Economics and Management (FOM), Neuss, Germany
2. SynOpus, Bochum, Germany
Interests: cardiovascular health; chronobiology; economics; mental health; psychology; shift-work; sleep; sociology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is no standard definition of shift-work universally, and validated reports of (complete) biological adjustment to shift-work at the level of the individual are missing. Because of the lack of studies and a rather narrow range of outcome measures, the evidence for shift-work tolerance is limited. Those factors that have been found associated with subjective or objective shift-work tolerance are young age, low scores of morningness or being a late chronotype, low scores of languidity and neuroticism, high scores on extraversion, internal locus of control and flexibility, and male sex. Future studies should identify more factors to widen this list, including the results of applied studies that have tested these factors. Such studies could range from identifying factors that are modifiable (e.g., lifestyle choices) as well as factors specific to the working time arrangement and the workplace setting. This Special Issue shall collect and discuss evidence to date regarding individual differences in shift-work tolerance, including prospects for future research and practical workplace recommendations.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Kantermann
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Clocks & Sleep is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • circadian
  • economics
  • family
  • gender
  • health
  • psychology
  • sleep
  • sex
  • sociology
  • tolerance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Working around the Clock: Is a Person’s Endogenous Circadian Timing for Optimal Neurobehavioral Functioning Inherently Task-Dependent?
Clocks & Sleep 2022, 4(1), 23-36; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep4010005 - 11 Feb 2022
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Abstract
Neurobehavioral task performance is modulated by the circadian and homeostatic processes of sleep/wake regulation. Biomathematical modeling of the temporal dynamics of these processes and their interaction allows for prospective prediction of performance impairment in shift-workers and provides a basis for fatigue risk management [...] Read more.
Neurobehavioral task performance is modulated by the circadian and homeostatic processes of sleep/wake regulation. Biomathematical modeling of the temporal dynamics of these processes and their interaction allows for prospective prediction of performance impairment in shift-workers and provides a basis for fatigue risk management in 24/7 operations. It has been reported, however, that the impact of the circadian rhythm—and in particular its timing—is inherently task-dependent, which would have profound implications for our understanding of the temporal dynamics of neurobehavioral functioning and the accuracy of biomathematical model predictions. We investigated this issue in a laboratory study designed to unambiguously dissociate the influences of the circadian and homeostatic processes on neurobehavioral performance, as measured during a constant routine protocol preceded by three days on either a simulated night shift or a simulated day shift schedule. Neurobehavioral functions were measured every 2 h using three functionally distinct assays: a digit symbol substitution test, a psychomotor vigilance test, and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale. After dissociating the circadian and homeostatic influences and accounting for inter-individual variability, peak circadian performance occurred in the late biological afternoon (in the “wake maintenance zone”) for all three neurobehavioral assays. Our results are incongruent with the idea of inherent task-dependent differences in the endogenous circadian impact on performance. Rather, our results suggest that neurobehavioral functions are under top-down circadian control, consistent with the way they are accounted for in extant biomathematical models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shift-Work and the Individual II)
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Article
Timing and Composition of Last Meal before Bedtime Affect Sleep Parameters of Night Workers
Clocks & Sleep 2021, 3(4), 536-546; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep3040038 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 1733
Abstract
Night workers tend to eat irregularly, both in terms of meal times and composition. The disruption in energy metabolism caused by inappropriate eating habits can negatively affect the sleep quality of these individuals. The objectives of this study were to determine the interval [...] Read more.
Night workers tend to eat irregularly, both in terms of meal times and composition. The disruption in energy metabolism caused by inappropriate eating habits can negatively affect the sleep quality of these individuals. The objectives of this study were to determine the interval between the last meal and bedtime and its relationship with both diurnal and nocturnal sleep parameters, as well as to evaluate the association of the adequacy of this meal with sleep parameters. The analyses were carried out for a usual sleep routine on a workday and a day off. This cross-sectional study was part of a controlled, randomized, double-blind, crossover clinical trial. The sample comprised 30 female nursing professionals who worked permanent night shifts of 12 × 36 h. Timing and composition of the last meal were obtained from food diaries, and sleep parameters were collected via actigraphy. On multiple linear regression analysis, every hour decrease in the interval between the last meal and sleep onset there was an increase of 0.39 h on diurnal sleep duration. Regarding food intake, every 1 g of fat and 1 g of carbohydrate consumed was associated with an increase in diurnal sleep onset latency of 0.13 h and 0.02 h, respectively. These findings suggest that both timing and composition of the last meal before bedtime may be potential key factors for good diurnal and nocturnal sleep among night-shift workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shift-Work and the Individual II)
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