Special Issue "Shift-Work and the Individual"

A special issue of Clocks & Sleep (ISSN 2624-5175). This special issue belongs to the section "Society".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 April 2021) | Viewed by 5587

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Thomas Kantermann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. University of Applied Sciences for Economics and Management (FOM), Neuss, Germany
2. SynOpus, Bochum, Germany
Interests: cardiovascular health; chronobiology; economics; mental health; psychology; shift-work; sleep; sociology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is no standard definition of shift-work universally, and validated reports of (complete) biological adjustment to shift-work at the level of the individual are missing. Because of the lack of studies and a rather narrow range of outcome measures, the evidence for shift-work tolerance is limited. Those factors that have been found associated with subjective or objective shift-work tolerance are young age, low scores of morningness or being a late chronotype, low scores of languidity and neuroticism, high scores on extraversion, internal locus of control and flexibility, and male sex. Future studies should identify more factors to widen this list, including the results of applied studies that have tested these factors. Such studies could range from identifying factors that are modifiable (e.g., lifestyle choices) as well as factors specific to the working time arrangement and the workplace setting. This Special Issue shall collect and discuss evidence to date regarding individual differences in shift-work tolerance, including prospects for future research and practical workplace recommendations.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Kantermann
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • circadian
  • economics
  • family
  • gender
  • health
  • psychology
  • sleep
  • sex
  • sociology
  • tolerance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
No Effect of Chronotype on Sleepiness, Alertness, and Sustained Attention during a Single Night Shift
Clocks & Sleep 2021, 3(3), 377-386; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep3030024 - 01 Jul 2021
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Abstract
The study’s aim was to examine the effect of chronotype on cognitive performance during a single night shift. Data were collected from 72 (36f) young, healthy adults in a laboratory study. Participants had a 9 h sleep period (03:00–12:00) followed by an 8 [...] Read more.
The study’s aim was to examine the effect of chronotype on cognitive performance during a single night shift. Data were collected from 72 (36f) young, healthy adults in a laboratory study. Participants had a 9 h sleep period (03:00–12:00) followed by an 8 h night shift (23:00–07:00). During the night shift, participants completed five test sessions, which included measures of subjective sleepiness, subjective alertness, and sustained attention (i.e., psychomotor vigilance task; PVT). Dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was derived from saliva samples taken during the evening preceding the night shift. A tertile split of DLMO was used to determine three chronotype categories: earlier (DLMO = 20:22 ± 0:42), intermediate (DLMO = 21:31 ± 0:13), and later (DLMO = 22:54 ± 0:54). There were (a) significant main effects of test session (all p < 0.001); (b) no main effects of chronotype; and (c) no interaction effects between chronotype and test session on sleepiness, alertness, PVT response time, and PVT lapses. The results indicate that under controlled sleeping conditions, chronotype based on dim light melatonin onset did not affect nighttime performance. Differences in performance during night shift between chronotypes reported by field studies may be related to differences in the amount and/or timing of sleep before or between night shifts, rather than circadian timing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shift-Work and the Individual)
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Article
Concordance of Chronotype Categorisations Based on Dim Light Melatonin Onset, the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire, and the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire
Clocks & Sleep 2021, 3(2), 342-350; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep3020021 - 17 Jun 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1619
Abstract
Chronotype reflects circadian timing and can be determined from biological markers (e.g., dim light melatonin onset; DLMO), or questionnaires (e.g., Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire; MEQ, or Munich Chronotype Questionnaire; MCTQ). The study’s aim was to quantify concordance between chronotype categorisations based on these measures. A [...] Read more.
Chronotype reflects circadian timing and can be determined from biological markers (e.g., dim light melatonin onset; DLMO), or questionnaires (e.g., Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire; MEQ, or Munich Chronotype Questionnaire; MCTQ). The study’s aim was to quantify concordance between chronotype categorisations based on these measures. A total of 72 (36f) young, healthy adults completed the MEQ and MCTQ and provided saliva samples hourly in dim light during the evening in a laboratory. The corrected midpoint of sleep on free days (MSFsc) was derived from MCTQ, and tertile splits were used to define early, intermediate and late DLMO-CT, MEQ-CT and MSFsc-CT chronotype categories. DLMO correlated with MEQ score (r = −0.25, p = 0.035) and MSFsc (r = 0.32, p = 0.015). For early, intermediate and late DLMO-CT categories, mean(SD) DLMO were 20:25(0:46), 21:33(0:10) and 23:03(0:53). For early, intermediate and late MEQ-CT categories, mean(SD) MEQ scores were 60.5(5.3), 51.4(2.9) and 40.8 (5.0). For early, intermediate and late MSFsc-CT categories, mean(SD) MSFsc were 03:23(0:34), 04:37(0:12) and 05:55(0:48). Low concordance of categorisations between DLMO-CT and MEQ-CT (37%), and between DLMO-CT and MSFsc-CT (37%), suggests chronotype categorisations depend on the measure used. To enable valid comparisons with previous results and reduce the likelihood of misleading conclusions, researchers should select measures and statistical techniques appropriate to the construct of interest and research question. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shift-Work and the Individual)
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Article
Trait Interindividual Differences in the Magnitude of Subjective Sleepiness from Sleep Inertia
Clocks & Sleep 2021, 3(2), 298-311; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep3020019 - 03 Jun 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1731
Abstract
In shift work settings and on-call operations, workers may be at risk of sleep inertia when called to action immediately after awakening from sleep. However, individuals may differ substantially in their susceptibility to sleep inertia. We investigated this using data from a laboratory [...] Read more.
In shift work settings and on-call operations, workers may be at risk of sleep inertia when called to action immediately after awakening from sleep. However, individuals may differ substantially in their susceptibility to sleep inertia. We investigated this using data from a laboratory study in which 20 healthy young adults were each exposed to 36 h of total sleep deprivation, preceded by a baseline sleep period and followed by a recovery sleep period, on three separate occasions. In the week prior to each laboratory session and on the corresponding baseline night in the laboratory, participants either extended their sleep period to 12 h/day or restricted it to 6 h/day. During periods of wakefulness in the laboratory, starting right after scheduled awakening, participants completed neurobehavioral tests every 2 h. Testing included the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale to measure subjective sleepiness, for which the data were analyzed with nonlinear mixed-effects regression to quantify sleep inertia. This revealed considerable interindividual differences in the magnitude of sleep inertia, which were highly stable within individuals after both baseline and recovery sleep periods, regardless of study condition. Our results demonstrate that interindividual differences in subjective sleepiness due to sleep inertia are substantial and constitute a trait. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shift-Work and the Individual)
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