Special Issue "Climate Change, Hydrology and Freshwater Resources"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ondrej Ledvinka
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Guest Editor
Hydrology Database and Water Budget Department, Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Na Sabatce 2050/17, CZ-143 06 Prague 4, Czechia
Interests: statistical hydrology and climatology; physical geography and geographical information science; climate change; geophysics; time series analysis; stochastic processes; spatial statistics and geostatistics; remote sensing
Dr. Josef Křeček
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Hydraulics and Hydrology, Czech Technical University in Prague, Thákurova 7, CZ-166 28 Prague 6, Czech Republic
Interests: applied hydrology; small catchment studies; water resources control; forest and water relationships; acid rain consequences
Dr. Anna Lamacova
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Guest Editor
Ground water Department, Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Na Sabatce 2050/17, CZ-143 06 Prague 4, Czechia
Interests: headwater catchment hydrology; hydrological modelling; impact of climate change; forest hydrology; groundwater flow patterns; time series analysis
Dr. Adam Kertesz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geographical Institute, Research Center for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1112 Budapest, Budaörsi út 45, Hungary
Interests: land degradation and desertification; landscape ecology; soil erosion; climate change impacts; soil and water conservation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to contribute to our Special Issue of Climate, which is intended to collect manuscripts devoted to studying climate change impacts on freshwater resources, either in various regions of the world from a global viewpoint, possibly focused on regionalization. Both contributions related to the evaluation of the past based on observed instrumental data or to the projections of future states based on climate models are welcome. Climatologists have already studied climate change manifestation for several decades, and have performed so-called detection and attribution analyses. However, hydrology, a fundamental scientific area supporting water resource management, reacted considerably later, which was caused by different historical factors that may be highlighted in manuscripts as well. Over the years, various statistical/stochastic techniques have been inherited from other fields or directly developed in hydrology. Furthermore, a wide range of hydrological models have been used for climate change impact studies, and geographical information systems with sound tools have also evolved. A wise combination of the tools currently at hand may lead to interesting results, provided that these results and the methodology used are critically assessed using the knowledge that experts already have nowadays. Therefore, besides scientific papers, the Special Issue should also include reviews and technical notes on the methods being employed in hydrology. The models can, moreover, be sensibly designed to analyze different components of water balance when studying expected climate change impacts for the purposes of supporting smart water resource management and decision processes. All these applications are welcome and are sought by our Special Issue, whose effect should move hydrologists and their cooperation with climatologists forward.

On the occasion of organizing two upcoming conferences in Czechia, specifically the Czech and Slovak Hydrological Days 2021 and, more importantly, the XXIX Conference of the Danubian Countries, high-quality contributions to these events will be preferred, and studies related to the Danube, Elbe and Oder river basins will be of the utmost interest. Both large-scale studies as well as small-scale studies will be selected for publication after peer review, possibly focused on whole basins or their headwaters, respectively. However, contributions representing other regions are welcome as well. Potential contributors who do not know if their topic fits the scope of the Special Issue are encouraged to contact the main Guest Editor, Dr. Ondrej Ledvinka, before the submission of their manuscripts to the editorial system.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Ondrej Ledvinka
Dr. Josef Křeček
Dr. Anna Lamacova
Dr. Adam Kertesz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • detection and attribution
  • time series analysis
  • statistical hydrology
  • GIS applications in hydrology
  • hydrological modelling
  • rainfall-runoff changes
  • snow and forest influence
  • air and water temperature
  • water quantity and quality
  • projections based on climate models
  • changes in hydrological cycle and water balance
  • hydrological drought and low flows

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Impact of Climate Change on the Reliability of Water Resources
Climate 2021, 9(11), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9110153 - 21 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 401
Abstract
Climate change impact assessment is crucial for strategic planning in many areas, including water management, agriculture and forestry. Water planning has a long tradition in the Czech Republic, who has implemented the requirements of the Water Framework Directive since 2000. Following the expected [...] Read more.
Climate change impact assessment is crucial for strategic planning in many areas, including water management, agriculture and forestry. Water planning has a long tradition in the Czech Republic, who has implemented the requirements of the Water Framework Directive since 2000. Following the expected impacts of climate change on the hydrological regime, adaptation measures in the water sector are being prepared as part of strategic plans. This contribution studies the uncertainty propagation of climate scenarios in hydrological data, which are then used to assess the reliability of water resources and to design appropriate adaptation measures. The results are being discussed for a case study in the deficit area of Rakovnický stream and Blšanska river basins, which are among the driest areas in the Czech Republic. Research of the impact of climate change on the reliability of water resources has been prepared using ensembles of selected regional climate models. This approach has allowed a probabilistic assessment of the impact on the hydrology regime and the reliability of water supply from reservoirs for various time horizons of climate change. In view of the relatively large variance of potential impacts on water resources, options for further strategic planning in the water management area are being discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Hydrology and Freshwater Resources)
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Article
Trends of Hydroclimatic Intensity in Colombia
Climate 2021, 9(7), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9070120 - 19 Jul 2021
Viewed by 681
Abstract
Prediction of precipitation changes caused by global climate change is a practical and scientific problem of high complexity. To advance, we look at the record of all available rain gauges in Colombia and at the CHIRPS database to estimate trends in essential variables [...] Read more.
Prediction of precipitation changes caused by global climate change is a practical and scientific problem of high complexity. To advance, we look at the record of all available rain gauges in Colombia and at the CHIRPS database to estimate trends in essential variables describing precipitation, including HY-INT, an index of the hydrologic cycle’s intensity. Most of the gauges and cells do not show significant trends. Moreover, the signs of the statistically significant trends are opposite between the two datasets. Satisfactory explanation for the discrepancy remains open. Among the CHIRPS database’s statistically significant trends, the western regions (Pacific and Andes) tend to a more intense hydrologic cycle, increasing both intensity and mean dry spell length, whereas for the northern and eastern regions (Caribbean, Orinoco, and Amazon), the tendencies are opposite. This dipole in trends suggests different mechanisms: ENSO affects western Colombia more directly, whereas rainfall in the eastern regions depends more on the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Amazon basin dynamics. Nevertheless, there is countrywide accord among gauges and cells with significant increasing trends for annual precipitation. Overall, these observations constitute essential evidence of the need for developing a more satisfactory theory of climate change effects on tropical precipitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Hydrology and Freshwater Resources)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Changes in groundwater spring yield patterns in Czechia
Authors: Ondrej Ledvinka, Anna Lamacova and Radek Vlnas
Affiliation: Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Hydrology Division, Na Sabatce 2050/17, 143 06 Prague 4, Czechia
Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate monthly, seasonal and annual trends in groundwater spring yield observed in Czechia. Time series of 101 springs were selected and evaluated over the period 1971–2019. More specifically, monotonic deterministic trends were detected by the so-called trend-free pre-whitening modification of the Mann–Kendall test, based on the time series of monthly median values. The aim was to reduce the influence of the first-order autocorrelation. Most of the series do not exhibit any long-term trend (72%) in annual data. However, considering statistically significant changes, the decrease prevailed over the increase. A reduction in yield was observed in 27% of springs, while an increase only in 2% of them. In the seasonal cycle, the yield decreased mostly in summer (33% of springs), in other seasons the yield decreased in 21–24% of the springs. Most often, the spring yield decreased in May (52%) and July (50%), least often in March (21%), when also a remarkably large proportion of springs showed a significant increase (10%). The increase in the spring yield in March is probably related to the change in the annual hydrological pattern, when, very likely due to rising air temperature and earlier snowmelt, the spring maximum of the groundwater spring yield shifted from April to March.

Title: Changes in Selected Low-Flow Characteristics in the Period 2001–2015 Compared with the Reference Period 1961–2000 in Slovakia
Authors: Lotta Blaškovičová 1, Katarína Jeneiová 1, Katarína Melová 1, Jana Poórová 1, Soňa Liová 2, Katarína Slivková 3 and Beáta Síčová 4
Affiliation: 1 Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute, Bratislava, Slovakia
2 Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute, Regional Office Žilina, Slovakia
3 Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute, Regional Office Banská Bystrica, Slovakia
4 Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute, Regional Office Košice
Abstract: The paper is focused on the assessment of drought on surface watercourses in Slovakia. Low-flow characteristics and their changes in the period 2001–2015 in comparison with the reference period 1961–2000 were evaluated at selected representative water-gauging stations. Two different methods were used to calculate the flow duration curves (FDC): the standard method, based on mean daily discharge data series for the whole evaluated period in descending order, and the alternative method, based on calculating the values of FDCs for each year of the assessed period first and then averaging the corresponding percentile values. The changes were evaluated for selected percentiles of the FDCs (330-, 355- and 364-day discharge). The number of days with the mean daily flow below the set limits and the seasonality of their occurrence were assessed. The results show significant changes in cases of both methods, in the compared time periods, while also differences in individual regions of Slovakia were found. The weakness of the standard method is in allowing the values of the smallest quantiles to be influenced by a small number of long-lasting drought episodes. The alternative method eliminates the mentioned shortcoming and could be used to determine the ecological flows in Slovakia.
Keywords: low flow; drought; flow duration curve

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