Heavy Precipitation Events, Causes and Affections

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2023) | Viewed by 6571

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
Interests: hydrology; precipitation processes; climate change; cryosphere
College of Humanities and Development Studies, China Agricultural University
Interests: emergency management; integrated disaster reduction and sustainable development; climate change risk and governance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change can affect the intensity and frequency of precipitation. Over the past decades, the intensification of heavy precipitation has been claimed in the world’s dry and wet regions. More specifically, there are sporadic record rainfall events and corresponding deadly floods in Western Europe and Central China in the summer of 2021. It arouses us special attention on all aspects of heavy precipitation.

This special issue focuses on recent advances in heavy precipitation, including events, causes, and affections. Papers referred with their relationships to floods and to the termination of droughts are particularly welcome.

Sincerely,

Dr. Yingzhao Ma
Dr. Yinsheng Zhang
Dr. Feng Kong
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Precipitation
  • Heavy rainfall
  • Flood
  • Water vapor
  • Climate change

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 9871 KiB  
Article
Flash Flood Reconstruction and Analysis—A Case Study Using Social Data
by Lenise Farias Martins, Ticiana Marinho de Carvalho Studart, João Dehon Pontes Filho, Victor Costa Porto, Francisco de Assis de Souza Filho and Francisco Railson da Silva Costa
Climate 2023, 11(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli11010020 - 7 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3167
Abstract
This work proposes a methodology for post-flood analysis in ungauged basins with low data availability located in semi-arid regions. The methodology combines social perception with recorded data. Social perception can be a useful tool to enhance the modeling process in cases where official [...] Read more.
This work proposes a methodology for post-flood analysis in ungauged basins with low data availability located in semi-arid regions. The methodology combines social perception with recorded data. Social perception can be a useful tool to enhance the modeling process in cases where official records are nonexistent or unsatisfactory. For this aim, we structured a four-step methodology. First, we create a repository with the information that reconstructs the analyzed event. Photos and news of the flood event are collected from social media platforms. The next step is to consult official government agencies to obtain documented information about the disaster. Then, semi-structured interviews are carried out with residents to obtain the extension and depth of the flooded spot. This social information creates an overview of the flood event that can be used to evaluate the hydraulic/hydrological modeling of the flood event and the quality of the recorded data. We analyzed a flood event in a city in semi-arid Brazil. The event caused several damages such as the breaking of dams and about 40% of the population was somehow impacted although the official rain data pointed to non-extreme precipitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heavy Precipitation Events, Causes and Affections)
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22 pages, 5806 KiB  
Article
Atmospheric and Oceanic Patterns Associated with Extreme Drought Events over the Paraná Hydrographic Region, Brazil
by Aline Araújo de Freitas, Michelle Simões Reboita, Vanessa Silveira Barreto Carvalho, Anita Drumond, Simone Erotildes Teleginski Ferraz, Benedito Cláudio da Silva and Rosmeri Porfírio da Rocha
Climate 2023, 11(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli11010012 - 2 Jan 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2655
Abstract
The Paraná Hydrographic Region (PHR) is one of the main hydrographic basins in Brazil, standing out for its energy generation and consumption, among other ecosystem services. Thus, it is important to identify hydrological drought events and the driest periods inside of these droughts [...] Read more.
The Paraná Hydrographic Region (PHR) is one of the main hydrographic basins in Brazil, standing out for its energy generation and consumption, among other ecosystem services. Thus, it is important to identify hydrological drought events and the driest periods inside of these droughts to understand the anomalous atmospheric circulation patterns associated with them (a multiscale study). This study used the standardized precipitation index (SPI) for the 12-month scale to identify hydrological drought episodes in the PHR from 1979 to 2021. For these episodes, the severity, duration, intensity, and peak were obtained, and the SPI-6 was applied to the longest and most severe drought to identify periods with dry conditions during the wet season. Anomalous atmospheric and oceanic patterns associated with such episodes were also analyzed. The results reveal that the longest and most severe hydrological drought on the PHR started in 2016. The end of this episode was not identified by the end of the analyzed period. The SPI-6 revealed three rainy seasons during this drought event marked by anomalous dry conditions: 2016/2017, 2019/2020, and 2020/2021. In general, the circulation patterns identified differ in each period, for example, in 2016/2017, an El Niño event was dominant, in 2019/2020, the tropical Pacific Ocean showed neutral conditions, and in 2020/2021, a La Niña episode was registered. Despite that, in the three periods, the anomalous atmospheric patterns contributed to the weakening of the low-level jet east of the Andes and, consequently, to the decreasing of the moisture transport to the PHR, then leading to dry conditions over the basin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heavy Precipitation Events, Causes and Affections)
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