Special Issue "Liver Cancers: From Bench to Bedside"

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Biology and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Matteo Maria Cimino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy
Interests: hepatobiliary surgery; traslational research; colorectal cancer; primitive liver tumours

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Liver cancers are a major issue in the oncosurgical community. The incidence of HCC and biliary tract cancers is steadily increasing due to the high prevalence of chronic hepatitis and the epidemic of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Colorectal liver metastases (CLM) are the third most common type of cancer and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide.

The so-called oncosurgical approach has been recognized as the gold standard in the treatment of CLM, pushing the limits of surgery especially in chemoresponse patients. The new discoveries in systemic therapy for primitive malignancies may also change the surgical indications for this disease.

This is the reason why the collaboration between surgeons and basic science researchers has been strengthened in recent decades.

Some of the new promising molecules in the treatment of HCC are the new two anti-PD-1 antibodies, namely nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Unfortunately, the low diffusion of their use in therapy is due to restrictions in their application by the European Union, which prevents confirmation of their validity. In the field of CLM, anti-PD-1 antibodies appear to be effective only in patients with microsatellite instability, which represent a small percentage of CLM patients.

This finding underlines the crucial relationship between the tumor and its immunological microenvironment.

The aim of this Special Issue is to share the latest insights into CLM derived from basic science findings, which can have an effective impact on surgical treatment of primitive and secondary liver lesions. Papers dealing with the development of new drugs or new information on the immunological interaction between the tumor and host are of particular interest.

Dr. Matteo Maria Cimino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • colorectal liver metastases
  • cholangiocarcinoma
  • hepatocellular carcinoma
  • immunological microenvironment
  • NK cells
  • macrophages

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Impact of M2BPGi on the Hepatocarcinogenesis after the Combination Therapy with Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir for Hepatitis C
Biomedicines 2021, 9(6), 660; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9060660 - 08 Jun 2021
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Abstract
The clinical significance of mac-2 binding protein glycosylation isomer (M2BPGi) levels based on virological responses due to antiviral therapy has not been fully evaluated. We compared the change before and 24 weeks after the therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir (DCV+ASV) of M2BPGi levels [...] Read more.
The clinical significance of mac-2 binding protein glycosylation isomer (M2BPGi) levels based on virological responses due to antiviral therapy has not been fully evaluated. We compared the change before and 24 weeks after the therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir (DCV+ASV) of M2BPGi levels with those of other fibrosis markers in 73 chronic hepatitis C cases. Moreover, we examined the association between M2BPGi levels and hepatocarcinogenesis in sustained virological response (SVR) and non-SVR cases. M2BPGi levels were significantly improved at post-treatment week 24 (PTW24) in SVR but not non-SVR cases, whereas the changes of other fibrosis markers showed the same tendency in both SVR and non-SVR cases. M2BPGi levels were well correlated with other fibrosis markers at baseline but not PTW24. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was significantly associated with M2BPGi levels at PTW24. The achievement of SVR significantly affected the improvement of M2BPGi levels that best reflected the effect of direct-acting antivirals among the fibrosis markers. Furthermore, M2BPGi levels at PTW24 were also associated with the incidence of HCC in only SVR cases. However, the rapid decrease of M2BPGi levels might reflect the amelioration of liver inflammation rather than the improvement of liver fibrosis, which should be further elucidated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liver Cancers: From Bench to Bedside)
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Review

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Review
Colorectal Cancer, Liver Metastases and Biotherapies
Biomedicines 2021, 9(8), 894; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9080894 - 26 Jul 2021
Abstract
(1) Background: colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the deadliest causes of death by cancer worldwide. Its first main metastatic diffusion spreads to the liver. Different mechanisms such as the epithelial–mesenchymal transition and angiogenesis are the characteristics of this invasion. At this stage, [...] Read more.
(1) Background: colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the deadliest causes of death by cancer worldwide. Its first main metastatic diffusion spreads to the liver. Different mechanisms such as the epithelial–mesenchymal transition and angiogenesis are the characteristics of this invasion. At this stage, different options are possible and still in debate, especially regarding the use of targeted therapeutics and biotherapies. (2) Methods: A review of the literature has been done focusing on the clinical management of liver metastasis of colorectal cancer and the contribution of biotherapies in this field. (3) Results: In a clinical setting, surgeons and oncologists consider liver metastasis in CRC into two groups to launch adapted therapeutics: resectable and non-resectable. Around these two entities, the combination of targeted therapies and biotherapies are of high interest and are currently tested to know in which molecular and clinical conditions they have to be applied to impact positively both on survival and quality of life of patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liver Cancers: From Bench to Bedside)
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Review
Proteomic Profiling and Artificial Intelligence for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Translational Medicine
Biomedicines 2021, 9(2), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9020159 - 06 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1533
Abstract
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary cancer of the liver with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Since 1963, when alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was discovered as a first HCC serum biomarker, several other protein biomarkers have been identified and introduced into clinical [...] Read more.
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary cancer of the liver with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Since 1963, when alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was discovered as a first HCC serum biomarker, several other protein biomarkers have been identified and introduced into clinical practice. However, insufficient specificity and sensitivity of these biomarkers dictate the necessity of novel biomarker discovery. Remarkable advancements in integrated multiomics technologies for the identification of gene expression and protein or metabolite distribution patterns can facilitate rising to this challenge. Current multiomics technologies lead to the accumulation of a huge amount of data, which requires clustering and finding correlations between various datasets and developing predictive models for data filtering, pre-processing, and reducing dimensionality. Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies have an enormous potential to overcome accelerated data growth, complexity, and heterogeneity within and across data sources. Our review focuses on the recent progress in integrative proteomic profiling strategies and their usage in combination with machine learning and deep learning technologies for the discovery of novel biomarker candidates for HCC early diagnosis and prognosis. We discuss conventional and promising proteomic biomarkers of HCC such as AFP, lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA)-reactive L3 glycoform of AFP (AFP-L3), des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin (DCP), osteopontin (OPN), glypican-3 (GPC3), dickkopf-1 (DKK1), midkine (MDK), and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) and highlight their functional significance including the involvement in cell signaling such as Wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/Akt, integrin αvβ3/NF-κB/HIF-1α, JAK/STAT3 and MAPK/ERK-mediated pathways dysregulated in HCC. We show that currently available computational platforms for big data analysis and AI technologies can both enhance proteomic profiling and improve imaging techniques to enhance the translational application of proteomics data into precision medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liver Cancers: From Bench to Bedside)
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