Synaptic Transmission: From Molecular to Neural Network Levels 2.0

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Biology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2866

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
Interests: neurophysiology; cerebellum; synaptic plasticity; neurotransmission; optogenetics; brain modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
Interests: neurophysiology; cerebellum; synaptic plasticity; neurotransmission; optogenetics; NMDA receptors; autism mouse models
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The communication between neurons is at the foundation of every neurophysiological activity, such as sensory perception, learning, and memory. It is well known that in the central nervous system, the number of neurons is around 1012, and the number of synapses can reach a thousand billion. This anatomical complexity is heightened by the complexity of mechanisms underlying synaptic transmission. Every connection adds processing features to the network activity, originating an ensemble that shows emerging properties that are difficult to track back to the single synapse level. Here comes the need for both bottom-up and top-down approaches to understand brain activity: how do the different components of neural machinery interact to generate such complex systems? How can the understanding of new pathways be used for pathologies’ treatments? Investigations at these two levels are both needed to reach a comprehensive view of brain activity. While the microscale level has often been the leading actor of neuroscience research, the mesoscale-to-macroscale level has attracted more and more attention in the last decade.

This Special Issue aims to provide a broad picture of the latest discoveries on synaptic transmission and its impact on network activities. Both experimental and computational works are welcomed, unraveling new properties of specific synapses or how they affect neural networks activity, both in physiological and pathological conditions.

Dr. Simona Tritto
Dr. Lisa Mapelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • neurotransmission
  • synapses
  • synaptic plasticity
  • simulation
  • brain
  • brain pathologies
  • neurocomputation

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

13 pages, 1337 KiB  
Review
Dopaminergic Modulation of Prefrontal Cortex Inhibition
by Danila Di Domenico and Lisa Mapelli
Biomedicines 2023, 11(5), 1276; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11051276 - 25 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2514
Abstract
The prefrontal cortex is the highest stage of integration in the mammalian brain. Its functions vary greatly, from working memory to decision-making, and are primarily related to higher cognitive functions. This explains the considerable effort devoted to investigating this area, revealing the complex [...] Read more.
The prefrontal cortex is the highest stage of integration in the mammalian brain. Its functions vary greatly, from working memory to decision-making, and are primarily related to higher cognitive functions. This explains the considerable effort devoted to investigating this area, revealing the complex molecular, cellular, and network organization, and the essential role of various regulatory controls. In particular, the dopaminergic modulation and the impact of local interneurons activity are critical for prefrontal cortex functioning, controlling the excitatory/inhibitory balance and the overall network processing. Though often studied separately, the dopaminergic and GABAergic systems are deeply intertwined in influencing prefrontal network processing. This mini review will focus on the dopaminergic modulation of GABAergic inhibition, which plays a significant role in shaping prefrontal cortex activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synaptic Transmission: From Molecular to Neural Network Levels 2.0)
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