Special Issue "Hip-Hop, Art, and Visual Culture: Connections, Influences, and Critical Discussions"

A special issue of Arts (ISSN 2076-0752). This special issue belongs to the section "Musical Arts and Theatre".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018).

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jeff Broome
Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor of Art Education, Director of Doctoral Program, Department of Art Education, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-1232, USA
Interests: narrative inquiry; cultural diversity; hip-hop and art education; caring approaches to art curricula; multi-age art education
Dr. Lisa Munson
Website
Guest Editor
Associate Teaching Faculty, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Sociology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-1232, USA
Interests: qualitative research methods; comparative and international education; sociology; hip-hop culture; social justice and urban education; intersectionality and social inequality; graffiti, street art, writing, and ephemerality; musicology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Visual art has been tied to hip-hop culture since its inception, and initially manifested itself most clearly in the form of graffiti and fashion trends. During the genre’s first decades, notable hip-hop practitioners whose work crossed the boundaries of music and visual art included Fab 5 Freddy, Rammellzee, and Jean-Michel Basquiat.  More current examples of cross-disciplinary connections between hip-hop and visual art include the efforts of Swizz Beatz, Ecletic Method, and the Hi-ARTS non-profit organization for advancing educational hip-hop projects in the arts.  Simultaneously, references to visual artists have appeared more frequently in the lyrics of hip-hop musicians such as Jay-Z, Nas, Kanye West, Rick Ross, and Lil Wayne.

In short, hip-hop has become a global phenomenon influencing many facets of society, including art, education, and visual culture.  The possibilities of this influence have not gone unnoticed, and a number of scholars have discussed the connections between hip-hop and visual art, fashion, and postmodernism, while others have critically examined hip-hop’s influence on visual culture.

We invite potential contributors to join these ongoing conversations by submitting manuscripts to be considered for inclusion in a Special Issue of Arts on the topic of "Hip-Hop, Art, and Visual Culture".

Some of the topics and questions that can be addressed in this issue, include, but are not limited to:

  • How have hip-hop practitioners’ relationships with visual art changed over time?
  • In what ways can hip-hop be used in classrooms as a tool to foster critical discussions related to visual culture, cultural appropriation, postmodernism, and/or aesthetics?
  • What has been the effect of name-dropping artists like Basquiat and Warhol on popular rap songs? How has this contributed to art as a symbol of luxury or a form of investment in contemporary hip-hop?

Dr. Jeff Broome
Dr. Lisa Munson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Arts is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hip-hop
  • visual culture art education
  • hip-hop and postmodernism
  • hip-hop and aesthetics
  • graffiti
  • culturally responsive pedagogy

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Introduction “Hip-Hop, Art, and Visual Culture: Connections, Influences, and Critical Discussions”
Arts 2019, 8(1), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010034 - 07 Mar 2019
Abstract
Visual art has been tied to hip-hop culture since its emergence in the 1970s [...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Roberto Lugo: Critical Discussions of Hip-Hop, Ceramics, and Visual Culture
Arts 2018, 7(4), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts7040102 - 10 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper looks at the creative work of “ghetto potter” Roberto Lugo. Through the examination of his various forms of art-making, various discussions regarding the intersections of ceramics, hip-hop, and visual culture are explored. Through these intersections, issues related to access and equity [...] Read more.
This paper looks at the creative work of “ghetto potter” Roberto Lugo. Through the examination of his various forms of art-making, various discussions regarding the intersections of ceramics, hip-hop, and visual culture are explored. Through these intersections, issues related to access and equity are explored. This paper explores topics and issues important to visual culture and art education. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Hip Hop Pedagogy as Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy
Arts 2018, 7(4), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts7040097 - 03 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper argues that Hip Hop Pedagogy is a version of Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and should be a part of art education. Further, we believe that when exploring Hip Hop Pedagogy, teachers need to reference the work of Black female and non-binary artists. [...] Read more.
This paper argues that Hip Hop Pedagogy is a version of Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and should be a part of art education. Further, we believe that when exploring Hip Hop Pedagogy, teachers need to reference the work of Black female and non-binary artists. After an overview of Hip Hop Pedagogy and Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy, we argue that these approaches should be a consistent part of art education. Through the work of contemporary visual artist and DJ, Rozeal, we offer suggestions for art educators about how they might transition their practice to embrace some aspects of Hip Hop Pedagogy. Specifically, through sampling and the distinction of cultural appreciation versus appropriation, we believe that art educators can change their practice to make their teaching more relevant to their students and to contemporary culture. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Homage or Biting Lines: Critically Discussing Authorship, Creativity, and Copyright in the 21st Century through Hip-Hop
Arts 2018, 7(4), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts7040086 - 22 Nov 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The inherent traits of digital media have challenged traditional understandings of artistic authorship and creativity. This division in understanding can clearly be observed in the popular culture context of hip-hop music. Hip-hop initially began with analog technologies such as vinyl record players, then [...] Read more.
The inherent traits of digital media have challenged traditional understandings of artistic authorship and creativity. This division in understanding can clearly be observed in the popular culture context of hip-hop music. Hip-hop initially began with analog technologies such as vinyl record players, then transitioned to predominately digital mediums. This changeover in artistic mediums has been well documented by opposing viewpoints from hip-hop artists, consumers, record companies, and lawyers. By focusing on hip-hop for critical discussion on artistic authorship and creativity, art students can engage in discussion reflecting on their own artistic and online practices, and how these behaviors are legally supported or suppressed by copyright law. Full article
Open AccessArticle
The Intertextuality and Translations of Fine Art and Class in Hip-Hop Culture
Arts 2018, 7(4), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts7040080 - 16 Nov 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Hip-hop culture is structured around key representational elements, each of which is underpinned by the holistic element of knowledge. Hip-hop emerged as a cultural counter position to the socio-politics of the urban condition in 1970s New York City, fuelled by destitution, contextual displacement, [...] Read more.
Hip-hop culture is structured around key representational elements, each of which is underpinned by the holistic element of knowledge. Hip-hop emerged as a cultural counter position to the socio-politics of the urban condition in 1970s New York City, fuelled by destitution, contextual displacement, and the cultural values of non-white diaspora. Graffiti—as the primary form of hip-hop expression—began as a political act before morphing into an artform which visually supported the music and dance elements of hip-hop. The emerging synergies graffiti shared with the practices of DJing, rap, and B-boying (breakdancing) forged a new form of art which challenged the cultural capital of music and visual and sonic arts. This article explores moments of intertextuality between visual and sonic metaphors in hip-hop culture and the canon of fine art. The tropes of Michelangelo, Warhol, Monet, and O’Keefe are interrogated through the lyrics of Melle Mel, LL Cool J, Rakim, Felt, Action Bronson, Homeboy Sandman and Aesop Rock to reveal hip-hop’s multifarious intertextuality. In conclusion, the article contests the fallacy of hip-hop as mainstream and lowbrow culture and affirms that the use of fine art tropes in hip-hop narratives builds a critical relationship between the previously disparate cultural values of hip-hop and fine art, and challenges conventions of the class system. Full article

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Open AccessBook Review
Hip Hop Family Tree Treasury Editions: A Book Review for Art and Visual Culture Educators
Arts 2019, 8(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010005 - 29 Dec 2018
Abstract
This book review examines Ed Piskor’s Hip Hop Family Tree as compiled and packaged by Fantagraphics into two gift box sets featuring a total of four treasury editions of collected works. The basic premise of Hip Hop Family Tree focuses on a loose [...] Read more.
This book review examines Ed Piskor’s Hip Hop Family Tree as compiled and packaged by Fantagraphics into two gift box sets featuring a total of four treasury editions of collected works. The basic premise of Hip Hop Family Tree focuses on a loose narrative detailing the historical development of hip-hop culture as depicted in a comic book format. The review begins with a brief summary of each treasury edition with a specific focus on selected vignettes detailing the role that visual art has played in hip-hop culture. The review closes with a discussion of the overall relevance of Piskor’s work to those working in art and visual culture education. Full article
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