Special Issue "Propulsion/Airframe Integration"

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. K. Todd Lowe
Website
Guest Editor
Kevin T. Crofton Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
Interests: flow diagnostics; supersonic jet noise reduction; engine/airframe integration; turbulent shear flow research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced aircraft concepts are increasingly reliant on closer coupling of propulsion systems with airframe aerodynamics, or propulsion/airframe integration (PAI), for optimal performance. For instance, several advanced concepts employ fuselage boundary layer ingestion by turbofan engines to achieve a reduction in mission fuel burn. These benefits occur at the system level, and oftentimes traditional measures of sub-system efficiency, such as thrust-to-weight ratio, lift-to-drag ratio, and propulsion efficiency, are obscured by the integration since sub-system and system characteristics are inseparable. While advanced multidisciplinary analyses have led to exciting new possibilities thought to leverage the benefits of PAI, several research challenges face the community before these benefits may be fully realized.

Advances in PAI include creative placement and distribution of propulsion, but rely on tolerance of propulsion devices to the highly non-uniform inlet flows that often result. The aerodynamics and design of inlets and exhausts for embedded turbomachinery requires additional care to understand and minimize losses and distortions. Even with advanced inlet designs, it is likely that modification of the turbomachinery is needed for optimal performance and stability of the fan rotor in the presence of distortions. Finally, while integration can be used to shield propulsion noise sources, the precise role of shielding and the aeroacoustic response of fans and exhausts to distorted flows remain topics of research interest.

In this Special Issue, manuscripts are sought that report new research on:

  • optimized airframe concepts with highly integrated propulsion systems.
  • systems performance analyses for integrated propulsion systems.
  • turbomachinery design, aerodynamic response, and aeromechanics for non-uniform inlet flow.
  • aerodynamics of integrated inlets and exhausts.
  • aeroacoustics of integrated propulsion systems.

Associate Professor K. Todd Lowe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • propulsion/airframe integration (PAI)
  • inlet distortion
  • multi-disciplinary design optimization
  • boundary layer ingestion
  • wake ingestion
  • vortex ingestion
  • ultra-high bypass (UHB) engines
  • configuration design
  • conceptual design
  • ground testing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Thrust Augmentation by Airframe-Integrated Linear-Spike Nozzle Concept for High-Speed Aircraft
Aerospace 2018, 5(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace5010019 - 09 Feb 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The airframe-integrated linear-spike nozzle concept applied to an external nozzle for high-speed aircraft was evaluated with regard to the thrust augmentation capability and the trim balance. The main focus was on the vehicle aftbody. The baseline airframe geometry was first premised to be [...] Read more.
The airframe-integrated linear-spike nozzle concept applied to an external nozzle for high-speed aircraft was evaluated with regard to the thrust augmentation capability and the trim balance. The main focus was on the vehicle aftbody. The baseline airframe geometry was first premised to be a hypersonic waverider design. The baseline aftbody case had an external nozzle comprised of a simple divergent nozzle and was hypothetically replaced with linear-spike external nozzle configurations. Performance evaluation was mainly conducted by considering the nozzle thrust generated by the pressure distribution on the external nozzle surface at the aftbody portion calculated by computer simulation at a given cruise condition with zero angle of attack. The thrust performance showed that the proposed linear-spike external nozzle concept was beneficial in thrust enhancement compared to the baseline geometry because the design of the proposed concept had a compression wall for the exhaust flow, which resulted in increasing the wall pressure. The configuration with the boattail and the angled inner nozzle exhibited further improvement in thrust performance. The trim balance evaluation showed that the aerodynamic center location appeared as acceptable. Thus, benefits were obtained by employing the airframe-integrated linear-spike external nozzle concept. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Propulsion/Airframe Integration)
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Open AccessArticle
Aerodynamic Testing of Helicopter Side Intake Retrofit Modifications
Aerospace 2017, 4(3), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace4030033 - 23 Jun 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
Aerodynamic characteristics of helicopter engine side air intakes are investigated. The experimental data set is obtained by wind tunnel testing of a full-scale helicopter fuselage section model. For the simulation of realistic engine operation, engine mass flow rates are reproduced. Five-hole pressure probe [...] Read more.
Aerodynamic characteristics of helicopter engine side air intakes are investigated. The experimental data set is obtained by wind tunnel testing of a full-scale helicopter fuselage section model. For the simulation of realistic engine operation, engine mass flow rates are reproduced. Five-hole pressure probe data of the aerodynamic interface plane as well as local surface pressure distributions are compared for different geometries and operation conditions. Previous investigations indicate that unshielded, sideways-facing air intakes yield lowest distortion and highest total pressure levels in low speed conditions. In fast forward flight condition, however, forward-facing intake shapes are more beneficial. On this basis, the current research assesses the optimization potential of retrofit modifications such as a rear spoiler (small scoop) and an intake guide vane. Two optimal configurations of retrofit modifications are identified, combining benefits of the various basic intake and plenum chamber shapes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Propulsion/Airframe Integration)
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