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Volume 1, December
 
 

Dermato, Volume 1, Issue 1 (September 2021) – 5 articles

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4 pages, 1773 KiB  
Case Report
Friction-Induced Biphasic Cutaneous Amyloidosis
by Thilo Gambichler, Laura Susok and Marc H. Segert
Dermato 2021, 1(1), 31-34; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato1010005 - 19 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 6013
Abstract
Primary cutaneous amyloidoses (PCA) are a group of conditions characterized by deposition of amyloid in previously normal skin, without association with other skin or systemic diseases. We describe a Kazakhstani female with a 30-year history of increasingly spreading hyperpigmented macular as well papular [...] Read more.
Primary cutaneous amyloidoses (PCA) are a group of conditions characterized by deposition of amyloid in previously normal skin, without association with other skin or systemic diseases. We describe a Kazakhstani female with a 30-year history of increasingly spreading hyperpigmented macular as well papular skin lesions on her upper trunk accompanied by pruritus. Moreover, her medical history included intensely rubbing her skin with a cotton towel following bathing and showering. On the basis of the clinical and histopathological findings, the diagnosis of biphasic cutaneous amyloidosis was made. The present unusual case of biphasic cutaneous amyloidosis can be subsumed under mechanically-induced forms of cutaneous amyloidosis. In conclusion, the present case underscores the necessity to explore carefully the patient’s history in order to discover the cause of PCA. Full article
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5 pages, 1322 KiB  
Case Report
A Case of Unilateral Hyperpigmentation
by Yujin Han, Se-Hoon Lee, Minah Cho, Sang-Hyun Cho, Jeong-Deuk Lee, Yu-Ri Woo and Hei-Sung Kim
Dermato 2021, 1(1), 26-30; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato1010004 - 1 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Phytophotodermatitis is a cutaneous phototoxic reaction resulting from contact with plant compounds such as furocoumarin in citrus fruits, followed by exposure to ultraviolet light. Erythema and vesicles appear on the contact area, followed by hyperpigmented lesions. Hyperpigmentation may exist for weeks to months [...] Read more.
Phytophotodermatitis is a cutaneous phototoxic reaction resulting from contact with plant compounds such as furocoumarin in citrus fruits, followed by exposure to ultraviolet light. Erythema and vesicles appear on the contact area, followed by hyperpigmented lesions. Hyperpigmentation may exist for weeks to months before fading but can remain up to several years. Diagnosis is often challenging due to the variety of clinical presentations, and it is not always easy to identify trigger exposures. A detailed history is key to diagnosis. We herein report a case of lime-induced phytophotodermatitis which was initially mistaken for unilateral lentiginosis. The patient underwent Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment with immediate improvement. Full article
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8 pages, 2976 KiB  
Article
Rare TERT Promoter Mutations Present in Benign and Malignant Cutaneous Vascular Tumors
by Philipp Jansen, Georg Christian Lodde, Anne Zaremba, Carl Maximilian Thielmann, Johanna Matull, Hansgeorg Müller, Inga Möller, Antje Sucker, Stefan Esser, Jörg Schaller, Dirk Schadendorf, Thomas Mentzel, Eva Hadaschik and Klaus Georg Griewank
Dermato 2021, 1(1), 18-25; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato1010003 - 25 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Mutations in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene have been described as the most common hot-spot mutations in different solid tumors. High frequencies of TERT promoter mutations have been reported to occur in tumors arising in tissues with [...] Read more.
Mutations in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene have been described as the most common hot-spot mutations in different solid tumors. High frequencies of TERT promoter mutations have been reported to occur in tumors arising in tissues with low rates of self-renewal. For cutaneous vascular tumors, the prevalence of TERT promoter mutations has not yet been investigated in larger mixed cohorts. With targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS), we screened for different known recurrent TERT promoter mutations in various cutaneous vascular proliferations. In our cohort of 104 representative cutaneous vascular proliferations, we identified 7 TERT promoter mutations. We could show that 4 of 64 (6.3%) hemangiomas and vascular malformations harbored TERT promoter mutations (1 Chr.5:1295228 C > T mutations, 1 Chr.5:1295228_9 CC > TT mutation, and 2 Chr.5:1295250 C > T mutations), 1 of 19 (5.3%) angiosarcomas harbored a Chr.5:1295250 C > T TERT promoter mutation, and 2 of 21 (9.5%) Kaposi’s sarcomas harbored TERT promoter mutations (2 Chr.5:1295250 C > T mutations). To our knowledge, this is the first general description of the distribution of TERT promoter mutations in a mixed cohort of cutaneous vascular tumors, revealing that TERT promoter mutations seem to occur with low prevalence in both benign and malignant cutaneous vascular proliferations. Full article
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16 pages, 1661 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Titanium Dioxide Type Combined with Coffee Oil Obtained from Coffee Industry Waste on Sunscreen Product Performance
by Bruna G. Chiari-Andréo, Joana Marto, Andreia Ascenso, Carlos Carneiro, Laura Rodríguez, Antonio José Guillot, Teresa M. Garrigues, Helena M. Ribeiro, Ana Melero and Vera Isaac
Dermato 2021, 1(1), 2-17; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato1010002 - 21 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3910
Abstract
(1) Background: Titanium dioxide (TiO2) consists of three polymorphs, including anatase, rutile and brookite. This work aimed to elucidate the influence of rutile and anatase forms in the performance of sunscreens formulated with green coffee oil (GCO) from coffee beans discarded [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Titanium dioxide (TiO2) consists of three polymorphs, including anatase, rutile and brookite. This work aimed to elucidate the influence of rutile and anatase forms in the performance of sunscreens formulated with green coffee oil (GCO) from coffee beans discarded in the agri-food industry. (2) Methods: TiO2 particles were characterized in terms of size and wettability. The sunscreens formulated with GCO were characterized regarding the droplet size, rheology, texture profile analysis (TPA), in vitro Sun Protection Factor and Water Resistance Retention. Topical delivery and permeation studies were performed to confirm caffeine release and skin penetration. (3) Results: Particle size distributions of rutile and anatase TiO2 particles were similar, however, smaller droplets as well as decreased viscosity and increased thixotropy were obtained for anatase TiO2 and GCO formulation compared to rutile form formulations. Notwithstanding, all formulations exhibited linear viscoelastic behavior. Regarding the TPA, a wide range of mechanical properties improved mainly by GCO rather than TiO2 form has been demonstrated. The influence of TiO2 form on UV protection was better evidenced in absence of GCO. The sunscreen formulations containing GCO presented a favorable topical delivery as confirmed by caffeine release and permeation. (4) Conclusions: Both TiO2 forms combined with GCO provided suitable properties including an effective ultraviolet (UV)-light protection. Full article
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1 pages, 149 KiB  
Editorial
Publisher’s Note: Dermato—A New Open Access Journal
by Peter Roth
Dermato 2021, 1(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato1010001 - 15 Jun 2021
Viewed by 2538
Abstract
In spring 2020, the open access journal Dermatopahtology [...] Full article
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