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Dermato, Volume 1, Issue 2 (December 2021) – 4 articles

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12 pages, 6963 KiB  
Case Report
The Case of a Patient with Limited Systemic Sclerosis and Interstitial Lung Disease Overlapping with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
by Karolina Krawczyk, Ewelina Mazur, Jaromir Kargol, Robert Kijowski and Adam Reich
Dermato 2021, 1(2), 59-70; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato1020009 - 20 Dec 2021
Viewed by 3901
Abstract
About 20% of patients with systemic sclerosis have symptoms of another connective tissue disease (CTD). Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is one of the most common organ manifestations in systemic sclerosis (SSc) as well as viral illnesses, such as COVID-19, and can lead not [...] Read more.
About 20% of patients with systemic sclerosis have symptoms of another connective tissue disease (CTD). Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is one of the most common organ manifestations in systemic sclerosis (SSc) as well as viral illnesses, such as COVID-19, and can lead not only to diffuse alveolar damage, but also trigger an exacerbation of fibrosis among patients with preexisting ILD. It is also associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. According to the World Scleroderma Foundation, SSc-ILD can mask or mimic early COVID-19 lesions and there are no available computed tomography guidelines on how to discern those two conditions. We present a case of systemic sclerosis exacerbation after COVID-19 in a patient with SSc-Lupus Overlap Syndrome. Full article
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12 pages, 1179 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Early Events after Skin-Barrier Disruption Using Microdialysis—A Human Ex Vivo Skin Model
by Katrine Baumann, Niels Peter Hell Knudsen, Anne-Sofie Østergaard Gadsbøll, Anders Woetmann and Per Stahl Skov
Dermato 2021, 1(2), 47-58; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato1020008 - 30 Nov 2021
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Abstract
Skin-barrier restoration following abrasive trauma is facilitated by mediator release from skin-resident cells, a process that has been investigated primarily in mice or simplified human systems with previous studies focusing on a limited number of biomarkers. Here, we demonstrate how early events caused [...] Read more.
Skin-barrier restoration following abrasive trauma is facilitated by mediator release from skin-resident cells, a process that has been investigated primarily in mice or simplified human systems with previous studies focusing on a limited number of biomarkers. Here, we demonstrate how early events caused by skin-barrier disruption can be studied in a human ex vivo skin model. Ten relevant biomarkers were recovered from the interstitial fluid by skin microdialysis with subsequent sample analysis using a multiplex platform. As a control, the biomarker profiles obtained from microdialysis sampling were compared to profiles of skin biopsy homogenates. We found that nine (GM-CSF, CXCL1/GROα, CXCL8/IL-8 CXCL10/IP-10, IL-1α, IL-6, MIF, TNF-α, and VEGF) of the 10 biomarkers were significantly upregulated in response to abrasive trauma. Only dialysate levels of CCL27/CTACK were unaffected by skin abrasion. Biomarker levels in the homogenates corresponded to dialysate levels for CCL27/CTACK, CXCL1/GROα, CXCL8/IL-8, and IL-6. However, IL-1α showed an inverse trend in response to trauma, and biopsy levels of MIF were unchanged. GM-CSF, CXCL10/IP-10, TNF-α, and VEGF were not detected in the biopsy homogenates. Our results suggest that the human ex vivo skin model is a reliable approach to study early events after disruption of the skin barrier. Full article
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4 pages, 970 KiB  
Case Report
A Case of Atypical Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome
by Yujin Han, Se-Hoon Lee, Minah Cho, Sang-Hyun Cho, Jeong-Deuk Lee, Yu-Ri Woo and Hei-Sung Kim
Dermato 2021, 1(2), 43-46; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato1020007 - 4 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 5049
Abstract
Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare complex vascular syndrome with limb hypertrophy. KTS is diagnosed if at least two of the three features of capillary malformation, venous malformation, and soft tissue and/or bone overgrowth are present. Of these, capillary malformation (i.e., port-wine stain) [...] Read more.
Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare complex vascular syndrome with limb hypertrophy. KTS is diagnosed if at least two of the three features of capillary malformation, venous malformation, and soft tissue and/or bone overgrowth are present. Of these, capillary malformation (i.e., port-wine stain) is the most commonly observed feature but may be absent in atypical KTS. We herein report a case of atypical KTS with venous malformation and unilateral soft tissue hypertrophy. Full article
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8 pages, 2013 KiB  
Case Report
Dermal Melanocytic Disorders
by Yujin Han, Se-Hoon Lee, Minah Cho, Sang-Hyun Cho, Jeong-Deuk Lee, Yu-Ri Woo and Hei-Sung Kim
Dermato 2021, 1(2), 35-42; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato1020006 - 1 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 7009
Abstract
Dermal melanocytic disorders present as bluish pigmentation on the skin. Several entities including Mongolian spot, aberrant Mongolian spot, nevus of Ota, and nevus of Ito have been reported. It is often difficult to distinguish between the different entities from their overlapping features. Although [...] Read more.
Dermal melanocytic disorders present as bluish pigmentation on the skin. Several entities including Mongolian spot, aberrant Mongolian spot, nevus of Ota, and nevus of Ito have been reported. It is often difficult to distinguish between the different entities from their overlapping features. Although they share similar etiologies and histologic findings, their co-morbidities and prognosis differ. In this paper, we report four cases of dermal melanocytic disorders of which we were not able to make a clear-cut diagnosis. Also, we briefly review the dermal melanocytic disorders. Full article
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