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Experimental Manipulation of Psychological Control Scenarios: Implications for Exercise and Memory Research

Exercise & Memory Laboratory, Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 386777, USA
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Psych 2019, 1(1), 279-289; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych1010019
Received: 6 April 2019 / Revised: 21 May 2019 / Accepted: 22 May 2019 / Published: 25 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognition and memory: from body to mind and back)
The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the extent to which variations in control activities influence memory function, as well as to investigate the participants’ memory expectations for the various conditions. A within-subject, counterbalanced experimental design was employed. Across four visits, participants engaged in four tasks, including an acute exercise session, and three cognitive-engagement control tasks of varying degrees of cognitive engagement and valence, namely reading neutral text, looking at a video, and puzzle completion. Participants’ perceived expectations for how each condition would improve their memory performance was also assessed. We observed no differences in objective cognitive performance or outcome expectations across the three evaluated control tasks, and thus, future studies may wish to employ either of these control tasks, which should not compromise making comparisons across studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognition; cognitive function; physical activity; placebo cognition; cognitive function; physical activity; placebo
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Blough, J.; Loprinzi, P.D. Experimental Manipulation of Psychological Control Scenarios: Implications for Exercise and Memory Research. Psych 2019, 1, 279-289.

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