Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Hydrothermal Synthesis, Characterization, and Sintering Behavior of Core-Shell Particles: A Principle Study on Lanthanum Strontium Cobaltite Coated with Nanosized Gadolinium Doped Ceria
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Elastic and Dielectric Evaluation of the Piezoelectric Response of Ferroelectrics Using Unpoled Ceramics
Open AccessArticle

Exploring the Processing of Tubular Chromite- and Zirconia-Based Oxygen Transport Membranes

Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, 12760 Pegasus Blvd, P.O. Box 162450, Orlando, FL 32816-2450, USA.
Current address: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Melbourne School of Engineering, The University of Melbourne, 173 Wilson Ave, Parkville VIC 3052, Australia.
Ceramics 2018, 1(2), 229-245; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics1020019
Received: 31 August 2018 / Revised: 22 September 2018 / Accepted: 27 September 2018 / Published: 29 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Ceramics for Energy Applications)
Tubular oxygen transport membranes (OTMs) that can be directly integrated in high temperature processes have a large potential to reduce CO2 emissions. However, the challenging processing of these multilayered tubes, combined with strict material stability requirements, has so far hindered such a direct integration. We have investigated if a porous support based on (Y2O3)0.03(ZrO2)0.97 (3YSZ) with a dense composite oxygen membrane consisting of (Y2O3)0.01(Sc2O3)0.10(ZrO2)0.89 (10Sc1YSZ) as an ionic conductor and LaCr0.85Cu0.10Ni0.05O3−δ (LCCN) as an electronic conductor could be fabricated as a tubular component, since these materials would provide outstanding chemical and mechanical stability. Tubular components were made by extrusion, dip coating, and co-sintering, and their chemical and mechanical integrity was evaluated. Sufficient gas permeability (≥10−14 m2) and mechanical strength (≥50 MPa) were achieved with extruded 3YSZ porous support tubes. The high co-sintering temperature required to densify the 10ScYSZ/LCCN membrane on the porous support, however, causes challenges related to the evaporation of chromium from the membrane. This chemical degradation caused loss of the LCCN electronic conducting phase and the formation of secondary lanthanum zirconate compounds and fractures. LCCN is therefore not suitable as the electronic conductor in a tubular OTM, unless means to lower the sintering temperature and reduce the chromium evaporation are found that are applicable to the large-scale fabrication of tubular components. View Full-Text
Keywords: oxygen transport membranes; yttria-stabilized zirconia; extrusion; thermoplastic; LaCrO3; dip coating; co-sintering; tubular membranes; porosity oxygen transport membranes; yttria-stabilized zirconia; extrusion; thermoplastic; LaCrO3; dip coating; co-sintering; tubular membranes; porosity
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Haugen, A.B.; Aguilera, L.M.; Kwok, K.; Molla, T.; Andersen, K.B.; Pirou, S.; Kaiser, A.; Hendriksen, P.V.; Kiebach, R. Exploring the Processing of Tubular Chromite- and Zirconia-Based Oxygen Transport Membranes. Ceramics 2018, 1, 229-245.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop