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What Happens in Your Brain When You Walk Down the Street? Implications of Architectural Proportions, Biophilia, and Fractal Geometry for Urban Science

1
Department of Computational Neuroscience, Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
2
Classic Planning Institute, Washington, DC 20007, USA
3
Departments of Mathematics and Architecture, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA
4
Physics Department, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97405, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jesús Manuel González Pérez
Urban Sci. 2022, 6(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci6010003
Received: 5 November 2021 / Revised: 23 December 2021 / Accepted: 31 December 2021 / Published: 7 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human-Centered Design)
This article reviews current research in visual urban perception. The temporal sequence of the first few milliseconds of visual stimulus processing sheds light on the historically ambiguous topic of aesthetic experience. Automatic fractal processing triggers initial attraction/avoidance evaluations of an environment’s salubriousness, and its potentially positive or negative impacts upon an individual. As repeated cycles of visual perception occur, the attractiveness of urban form affects the user experience much more than had been previously suspected. These perceptual mechanisms promote walkability and intuitive navigation, and so they support the urban and civic interactions for which we establish communities and cities in the first place. Therefore, the use of multiple fractals needs to reintegrate with biophilic and traditional architecture in urban design for their proven positive effects on health and well-being. Such benefits include striking reductions in observers’ stress and mental fatigue. Due to their costs to individual well-being, urban performance, environmental quality, and climatic adaptation, this paper recommends that nontraditional styles should be hereafter applied judiciously to the built environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: biophilic design; design-attention; disengagement; engagement; eye-tracking; façades; fractals; interaction-design; neuroscience; public-space; traditional styles; urban design; Visual Attention Software biophilic design; design-attention; disengagement; engagement; eye-tracking; façades; fractals; interaction-design; neuroscience; public-space; traditional styles; urban design; Visual Attention Software
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MDPI and ACS Style

Brielmann, A.A.; Buras, N.H.; Salingaros, N.A.; Taylor, R.P. What Happens in Your Brain When You Walk Down the Street? Implications of Architectural Proportions, Biophilia, and Fractal Geometry for Urban Science. Urban Sci. 2022, 6, 3. https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci6010003

AMA Style

Brielmann AA, Buras NH, Salingaros NA, Taylor RP. What Happens in Your Brain When You Walk Down the Street? Implications of Architectural Proportions, Biophilia, and Fractal Geometry for Urban Science. Urban Science. 2022; 6(1):3. https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci6010003

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brielmann, Aenne A., Nir H. Buras, Nikos A. Salingaros, and Richard P. Taylor. 2022. "What Happens in Your Brain When You Walk Down the Street? Implications of Architectural Proportions, Biophilia, and Fractal Geometry for Urban Science" Urban Science 6, no. 1: 3. https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci6010003

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