Next Article in Journal
Indigenous Relationality: Women, Kinship and the Law
Next Article in Special Issue
Black Religion and Black Power: The Nation of Islam’s Internationalism
Previous Article in Journal
Interraciality in Early Twentieth Century Britain: Challenging Traditional Conceptualisations through Accounts of ‘Ordinariness’
Previous Article in Special Issue
Black Lives Matter! Nigerian Lives Matter!: Language and Why Black Performance Matters
Open AccessArticle

Modernity, Representation of Violence, and Women’s Rebellion in Dangaremba’s Nervous Conditions

Independent Scholar, 27002 Lugo, Spain
Genealogy 2019, 3(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3020022
Received: 27 January 2019 / Revised: 12 March 2019 / Accepted: 3 April 2019 / Published: 19 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Black Movements)
In 1980, after decades of violent war, the apartheid regime came to an end, Zimbabwe was declared an independent state, and Robert Mugabe’s party the Zimbabwean African Union–Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF) ascended to power. While black leaders concentrated on the struggle against the tyranny of racial segregation, independence did not challenge gender hierarchies or minimize patriarchal privilege. Women soldiers who participated in the guerrillas were excluded from the spheres of power and relegated to poverty and invisibility. Here, I analyze how Dangaremba’s novel Nervous Conditions unveils women’s response to multiple forms of violence that target their bodies and minds. Although Dangaremba does not refer explicitly to the Chimurenga, also known as the bush war, in the novel, the sadness, bitterness, and sentiment of betrayal subsume women’s feeling about their absence in the construction of a new nation. For women writers, the representation of violence, through a feminine and postcolonial perspective, opens up creative ways to pursue textual liberation, thus defying literary genre and literary forms often very connected to systems of power. In this sense, her narrative instills in the reader the sentiment which evolves from women’s condition in the novel. View Full-Text
Keywords: representation of violence; modernity in Zimbabwe; textual liberation; gender hierarchies representation of violence; modernity in Zimbabwe; textual liberation; gender hierarchies
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Da Silva, M.I. Modernity, Representation of Violence, and Women’s Rebellion in Dangaremba’s Nervous Conditions. Genealogy 2019, 3, 22.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop