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Open AccessArticle

Looking at the Origin: Some Insights into the General and Fermentative Microbiota of Vineyard Soils

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Department of Genetics, Physiology and Microbiology, Unit of Microbiology, Biology Faculty, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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Pago de Carraovejas, S.L.U., Camino de Carraovejas, s/n, 47300 Peñafiel, Valladolid, Spain
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Science Department, Biome Makers Spain, 47011 Valladolid, Spain
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Department of Biology, Geology, Physics & Inorganic Chemistry, Unit of Biodiversity and Conservation, Rey Juan Carlos University, 28933 Móstoles, Spain
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Departament of Earth Physics & Astrophysics, Physics Faculty, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Fermentation 2019, 5(3), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation5030078
Received: 8 July 2019 / Revised: 21 August 2019 / Accepted: 27 August 2019 / Published: 29 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Technologies and Their Influence in Fermentation Quality)
In winemaking processes, there is a current tendency to develop spontaneous fermentations taking advantage of the metabolic diversity of derived from the great microbial diversity present in grape musts. This enological practice enhances wine complexity, but undesirable consequences or deviations could appear on wine quality. Soil is a reservoir of important microorganisms for different beneficial processes, especially for plant nutrition, but it is also the origin of many of the phytopathogenic microorganisms that affect vines. In this study, a meta-taxonomic analysis of the microbial communities inhabiting vineyard soils was realized. A significant impact of the soil type and climate aspects (seasonal patterns) was observed in terms of alpha and beta bacterial diversity, but fungal populations appeared as more stable communities in vineyard soils, especially in terms of alpha diversity. Focusing on the presence and abundance of wine-related microorganisms present in the studied soils, some seasonal and soil-dependent patterns were observed. The Lactobacillaceae family, containing species responsible for the malolactic fermentation, was only present in non-calcareous soils samples and during the summer season. The study of wine-related fungi indicated that the Debaryomycetaceae family dominates the winter yeast population, whereas the Saccharomycetaceae family, containing the most important fermentative yeast species for winemaking, was detected as dominant in summer. View Full-Text
Keywords: meta-taxonomic analysis; vineyard soil; wine-related bacteria; wine-related fungi meta-taxonomic analysis; vineyard soil; wine-related bacteria; wine-related fungi
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Alonso, A.; de Celis, M.; Ruiz, J.; Vicente, J.; Navascués, E.; Acedo, A.; Ortiz-Álvarez, R.; Belda, I.; Santos, A.; Gómez-Flechoso, M.Á.; Marquina, D. Looking at the Origin: Some Insights into the General and Fermentative Microbiota of Vineyard Soils. Fermentation 2019, 5, 78.

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